under Idioms & Phrases


bob under

  • verb disappear suddenly, as if under the surface of a body of water
WordNet

buckle under

  • verb consent reluctantly
    give in; succumb; yield; buckle under.
WordNet

contract under seal

  • noun a contract that is signed and has the (wax) seal of the signer attached
    sealed instrument; special contract.
WordNet

fall under

  • verb be included in or classified as
    fall into.
    • This falls under the rubric 'various'
WordNet

get under one's skin

  • verb irritate
    get.
    • Her childish behavior really get to me
    • His lying really gets me
WordNet

go under

  • verb go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
    go down; settle; sink.
  • verb disappear beyond the horizon
    go down; set.
    • the sun sets early these days
  • verb be called; go by a certain name
    go by.
    • She goes by her maiden name again
WordNet

going under

  • noun (of a ship) sinking
    foundering.
WordNet

hot under the collar

  • adjective satellite very angry
WordNet

knuckle under

  • verb consent reluctantly
    give in; succumb; yield; buckle under.
WordNet

lying under oath

  • noun criminal offense of making false statements under oath
    perjury; bearing false witness.
WordNet

pheasant under glass

  • noun a dish of roast pheasant served in a manner characteristic of expensive restaurants
WordNet

put under

  • verb administer an anesthetic drug to
    anesthetise; anaesthetise; anaesthetize; anesthetize; put out.
    • The patient must be anesthetized before the operation
    • anesthetize the gum before extracting the teeth
WordNet

Putting the hand under the thigh

  • an ancient Jewish ceremony used in swearing.
Webster 1913

sweep under the rug

  • verb to conceal something in the hopes it won't be discovered by others
    • The president tried to sweep the embarrassing incident under the rug
WordNet

To be under a cloud

  • to be under suspicion or in disgrace; to be in disfavor.
Webster 1913

To be under hatches

  • to be confined below in a vessel; to be under arrest, or in slavery, distress, etc.
Webster 1913

To be under the mahogany

  • to be so drunk as to have fallen under the table. Eng.
Webster 1913

To be under way, ∨ To have way

  • (Naut.), to be in motion, as when a ship begins to move.
Webster 1913

To bring under

  • to subdue; to restrain; to reduce to obedience.
Webster 1913

To come under

  • to belong to, as an individual to a class.
Webster 1913

To cut under

  • to undersell; as, to cut under a competitor in trade.
Webster 1913

To fall under

  • . (a) To come under, or within the limits of; to be subjected to; as, they fell under the jurisdiction of the emperor. (b) To come under; to become the subject of; as, this point did not fall under the cognizance or deliberations of the court; these things do not fall under human sight or observation. (c) To come within; to be ranged or reckoned with; to be subordinate to in the way of classification; as, these substances fall under a different class or order.
Webster 1913

To go under

  • . (a) To set; said of the sun. (b) To be known or recognized by (a name, title, etc. ). (c) To be overwhelmed, submerged, or defeated; to perish; to succumb.
Webster 1913

To have under the girdle

  • to have bound to one, that is, in subjection.
Webster 1913

To keep under

  • to hold in subjection; hence, to oppress.
Webster 1913

To knock under

  • to yield; to submit; to acknowledge one's self conquered; an expression probably borrowed from the practice of knocking under the table with the knuckles, when conquered. "Colonel Esmond knocked under to his fate." Thackeray.
Webster 1913

To lay under

  • to subject to; as, to lay under obligation or restraint.
Webster 1913

To lie under

  • to be subject to; to suffer; to be oppressed by.
Webster 1913

To put one's legs under some one's mahogany

  • to dine with him. Slang
Webster 1913

To put under the screwscrews

  • to subject to presure; to force.
Webster 1913

To sit under

  • to be under the instruction or ministrations of; as, to sit under a preacher; to sit under good preaching.
Webster 1913

To stand under

  • to undergo; to withstand. Shak.
Webster 1913

To turn under

  • to bend, or be folded, downward or under.
Webster 1913

Under arms

  • adverb armed and prepared for fighting
WordNet
  • . (Mil.) (a) Drawn up fully armed and equipped. (b) Enrolled for military service; as, the state has a million men under arms.
Webster 1913

under attack

  • adjective satellite subjected to enemy attack or censure
    under attack.
    • an official under fire for mismanagement
WordNet

Under canvas

  • . (a) (Naut.) Moved or propelled by sails; said of any vessel with her sail set, but especially of a steamer using her sails only, as distinguished from one under steam. Under steam and canvas signifies that a vessel is using both means of propulsion. (b) (Mil.) Provided with, or sheltered in, tents.
Webster 1913

Under covert

  • (Zoöl.), one of the feathers situated beneath the bases of the quills in the wings and tail of a bird. See Illust. under Bird.
Webster 1913

Under fire

  • adjective satellite subjected to enemy attack or censure
    under attack.
    • an official under fire for mismanagement
WordNet
  • exposed to an enemy's fire; taking part in a battle or general engagement.
Webster 1913

Under foot

  • . See under Foot, n.
Webster 1913

Under ground

  • below the surface of the ground.
Webster 1913

under it

  • adverb under that
    under it; thereunder.
    • the headings and the items listed thereunder
WordNet

Under one's signature

  • with one's signature or name subscribed; attested or confirmed by one's signature. Cf. the second Note under Over, prep.
Webster 1913

Under sail

  • . (Naut.) (a) With anchor up, and under the influence of sails; moved by sails; in motion. (b) With sails set, though the anchor is down. (c) Same as Under canvas (a), above. Totten.
Webster 1913

Under sentence

  • having had one's sentence pronounced.
Webster 1913

under that

  • adverb under that
    under it; thereunder.
    • the headings and the items listed thereunder
WordNet

Under the breath

  • with low voice; very softly.
Webster 1913

under the circumstances

  • adverb because of prevailing conditions
    • under the circumstances I cannot buy the house
WordNet

Under the lee

  • (Naut.), to the leeward; as, under the lee of the land.
Webster 1913

Under the rose

  • . See under Rose, n.
Webster 1913

under the weather

  • adjective satellite somewhat ill or prone to illness
    peaked; indisposed; unwell; sickly; ailing; seedy; poorly.
    • my poor ailing grandmother
    • feeling a bit indisposed today
    • you look a little peaked
    • feeling poorly
    • a sickly child
    • is unwell and can't come to work
WordNet

Under water

  • below the surface of the water.
Webster 1913

under way

  • adverb in motion; set in motion
    • the ship got under way
WordNet

Under way, ∨ Under weigh

  • (Naut.), in a condition to make progress; having started.
Webster 1913

under wraps

  • adjective satellite kept secret
    • the plan was kept carefully under wraps
WordNet

under-age

Un"der-age` adjective

Definitions
  1. Not having arrived at adult age, or at years of discretion; hence, raw; green; immature; boyish; childish. Obs.
    I myself have loved a lady, and pursued her with a great deal of under-age protestation. J. Webster.
Webster 1913

under-arm

Un"der-arm adjective

Definitions
  1. (Cricket) Done (as bowling) with the arm not raised above the elbow, that is, not swung far out from the body; underhand. Cf. Over-arm and Round-Arm.
Webster 1913

under-garment

Un"der-gar`ment noun

Definitions
  1. A garment worn below another.
Webster 1913

under-the-counter

  • adjective satellite done or sold illicitly and secretly;
WordNet

under-the-table

  • adjective satellite designed and carried out secretly or confidentially
    behind-the-scenes; sub-rosa.
    • a sub-rosa report
    • has their under-the-table backing
WordNet

water under the bridge

  • noun past events to be put aside
    bygone.
    • let bygones be bygones
WordNet