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throw Idioms & Phrases


charity throw

  • noun an unhindered basketball shot from the foul line; given to penalize the other team for committing a foul
    foul shot; charity toss; charity shot; free throw; charity throw.
WordNet

free throw

  • noun an unhindered basketball shot from the foul line; given to penalize the other team for committing a foul
    foul shot; charity toss; charity shot; free throw; charity throw.
WordNet

free throw lane

  • noun a lane on a basketball court extending from the end line to 15 feet in front of the backboard; players may not enter this lane during a free throw
WordNet

hammer throw

  • noun an athletic competition in which a heavy metal ball that is attached to a flexible wire is hurled as far as possible
WordNet

penalty free throw

  • noun an unhindered basketball shot from the foul line; given to penalize the other team for committing a foul
    foul shot; charity toss; charity shot; free throw; charity throw.
WordNet

Stone's cast, ∨ Stone's throw

  • the distance to which a stone may be thrown by the hand.
Webster 1913

stone's throw

  • noun a short distance
    step.
    • it's only a step to the drugstore
WordNet

throw a fit

  • verb get very angry and fly into a rage
    hit the roof; flip one's lid; have kittens; fly off the handle; go ballistic; flip one's wig; hit the ceiling; blow one's stack; lose one's temper; combust; blow up; blow a fuse; have a fit.
    • The professor combusted when the student didn't know the answer to a very elementary question
    • Spam makes me go ballistic
WordNet

throw away

  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; cast out; put away; discard; toss out; toss away.
    • Put away your worries
  • verb get rid of
    shake off; shed; throw away; drop; cast off; cast; throw.
    • he shed his image as a pushy boss
    • shed your clothes
WordNet

throw back

  • verb throw back with a quick, light motion
    toss back.
    • She tossed back her head
WordNet

throw cold water on

  • verb be discouraging or negative about
    pour cold water on.
WordNet

throw in

  • verb add as an extra or as a gratuity
  • verb give up in the face of defeat of lacking hope; admit defeat
    quit; throw in; drop out; chuck up the sponge; fall by the wayside; give up; drop by the wayside.
    • In the second round, the challenger gave up
  • verb to insert between other elements
    put in; interject; interpose; come in; inject.
    • She interjected clever remarks
WordNet

throw in the towel

  • verb give up in the face of defeat of lacking hope; admit defeat
    quit; throw in; drop out; chuck up the sponge; fall by the wayside; give up; drop by the wayside.
    • In the second round, the challenger gave up
WordNet

throw off

  • verb get rid of
    shake off; shed; throw away; drop; cast off; cast; throw.
    • he shed his image as a pushy boss
    • shed your clothes
  • verb get rid of
    shake off; escape from; shake.
    • I couldn't shake the car that was following me
WordNet

throw out

  • verb force to leave or move out
    kick out; expel.
    • He was expelled from his native country
  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; cast out; put away; discard; toss out; toss away.
    • Put away your worries
  • verb remove from a position or office
    oust; expel; boot out; drum out; kick out.
    • The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds
  • verb bring forward for consideration or acceptance
    advance.
    • advance an argument
  • verb cease to consider; put out of judicial consideration
    dismiss.
    • This case is dismissed!
WordNet

throw out of kilter

  • verb throw into great confusion or disorder
    derange; perturb.
    • Fundamental Islamicists threaten to perturb the social order in Algeria and Egypt
WordNet

throw overboard

  • verb lose (s.th.) or lose the right to (s.th.) by some error, offense, or crime
    forego; forfeit; waive; forgo; give up.
    • you've forfeited your right to name your successor
    • forfeited property
  • verb throw from a boat
    deep-six.
WordNet

throw pillow

  • noun a small cushion that is used for decorative purposes
WordNet

throw rug

  • noun a small rug; several can be used in a room
    scatter rug.
WordNet

throw stick

  • noun a curved piece of wood; when properly thrown will return to thrower
    boomerang; throw stick.
WordNet

throw together

  • verb produce shoddily, without much attention to detail
    fudge together.
  • verb bring into random order
    jumble; scramble.
WordNet

throw up

  • verb eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth
    retch; regorge; be sick; disgorge; spew; vomit up; puke; honk; cat; purge; cast; spue; upchuck; vomit; sick; barf; regurgitate; chuck.
    • After drinking too much, the students vomited
    • He purged continuously
    • The patient regurgitated the food we gave him last night
WordNet

throw-crook

Throw"-crook` noun
Definitions
  1. (Agric.) An instrument used for twisting ropes out of straw.
Webster 1913

throw-in

  • noun (rugby) an act or instance of throwing a ball in to put it into play
WordNet

throw-off

Throw"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. A start in a hunt or a race. Eng.
Webster 1913

throw-weight

  • noun the weight of the payload of a missile (not including the weight of the rocket)
WordNet

throwing away

  • noun getting rid something that is regarded as useless or undesirable
    discard.
WordNet

throwing board

  • noun a device resembling a sling that is used in various primitive societies to propel a dart or spear
    spear thrower; dart thrower; throwing board.
WordNet

throwing stick

  • noun a device resembling a sling that is used in various primitive societies to propel a dart or spear
    spear thrower; dart thrower; throwing board.
  • noun a curved piece of wood; when properly thrown will return to thrower
    boomerang; throw stick.
WordNet

thrown and twisted

  • adjective satellite twisted together; as of filaments spun into a thread
    thrown.
    • thrown silk is raw silk that has been twisted and doubled into yarn
WordNet

thrown-away

  • adjective satellite thrown away
    discarded; cast-off; throwaway.
    • wearing someone's cast-off clothes
    • throwaway children living on the streets
    • salvaged some thrown-away furniture
WordNet

To give, ∨ throw, to the dogs

  • to throw away as useless. "Throw physic to the dogs; I'll none of it." Shak.
Webster 1913

To throw in, ∨ out of, gear

  • (Mach.), to connect or disconnect (wheelwork or couplings, etc.); to put in, or out of, working relation.
Webster 1913

To throw about

  • to cast about; to try expedients. R.
Webster 1913

To throw away

  • . (a) To lose by neglect or folly; to spend in vain; to bestow without a compensation; as, to throw away time; to throw away money. (b) To reject; as, to throw away a good book, or a good offer.
Webster 1913

To throw back

  • . (a) To retort; to cast back, as a reply. (b) To reject; to refuse. (c) To reflect, as light.
Webster 1913

To throw by

  • to lay aside; to discard; to neglect as useless; as, to throw by a garment.
Webster 1913

To throw down

  • to subvert; to overthrow; to destroy; as, to throw down a fence or wall.
Webster 1913

To throw down the gauntlet

  • to offer or send a challenge. The gauntlet or glove was thrown down by the knight challenging, and was taken up by the one who accepted the challenge; hence the phrases.
Webster 1913

To throw down the glove

  • to challenge to combat.
Webster 1913

To throw dust in one's eyes

  • to mislead; to deceive. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To throw in

  • . (a) To inject, as a fluid. (b) To put in; to deposit with others; to contribute; as, to throw in a few dollars to help make up a fund; to throw in an occasional comment. (c) To add without enumeration or valuation, as something extra to clinch a bargain.
Webster 1913

To throw off

  • . (a) To expel; to free one's self from; as, to throw off a disease. (b) To reject; to discard; to abandon; as, to throw off all sense of shame; to throw off a dependent. (c) To make a start in a hunt or race. Eng. (d) To emit. Same as throw out (e). (e) To disconcert or confuse. Same as to throw out (f).
Webster 1913

To throw on

  • to cast on; to load.
Webster 1913

To throw one's self down

  • to lie down neglectively or suddenly.
Webster 1913

To throw one's self onupon

  • . (a) To fall upon. (b) To resign one's self to the favor, clemency, or sustain power of (another); to repose upon.
Webster 1913

To throw out

  • . (a) To cast out; to reject or discard; to expel. "The other two, whom they had thrown out, they were content should enjoy their exile." Swift. "The bill was thrown out." Swift. (b) To utter; to give utterance to; to speak; as, to throw out insinuation or observation. "She throws out thrilling shrieks." Spenser. (c) To distance; to leave behind. Addison. (d) To cause to project; as, to throw out a pier or an abutment. (e) To give forth; to emit; as, an electric lamp throws out a brilliant light. (f) To put out; to confuse; as, a sudden question often throws out an orator.
Webster 1913

To throw over

  • to abandon; to betray. Cf. To throw overboard, under Overboard.
  • to abandon the cause of; to desert; to discard; as, to throw over a friend in difficulties.
Webster 1913

To throw overboard

  • to discard; to abandon, as a dependent or friend.
Webster 1913

To throw up

  • . (a) To resign; to give up; to demit; as, to throw up a commission. "Experienced gamesters throw up their cards when they know that the game is in the enemy's hand." Addison. (b) To reject from the stomach; to vomit. (c) To construct hastily; as, to throw up a breastwork of earth.
Webster 1913

To throw up another's heels

  • to trip him. Bunyan.
Webster 1913

To throw up the sponge

  • to give up a contest; to acknowledge defeat; from a custom of the prize ring, the person employed to sponge a pugilist between rounds throwing his sponge in the air in token of defeat. Cant or Slang "He was too brave a man to throw up the sponge to fate." Lowell. now, through in the towel is more common, and has the same origin and meaning.
Webster 1913

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

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