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break through

  • verb pass through (a barrier)
    crack.
    • Registrations cracked through the 30,000 mark in the county
  • verb penetrate
    break through.
    • The sun broke through the clouds
    • The rescue team broke through the wall in the mine shaft
  • verb break out
    erupt; come out; break through.
    • The tooth erupted and had to be extracted
WordNet

breeze through

  • verb succeed at easily
    ace; nail; sail through; pass with flying colors; breeze through.
    • She sailed through her exams
    • You will pass with flying colors
    • She nailed her astrophysics course
WordNet

bring through

  • verb bring into safety
    bring through; save; carry through.
    • We pulled through most of the victims of the bomb attack
WordNet

bull through

  • verb push or force
    bull.
    • He bulled through his demands
WordNet

carry through

  • verb put in effect
    fulfil; execute; accomplish; carry out; action; fulfill.
    • carry out a task
    • execute the decision of the people
    • He actioned the operation
  • verb bring into safety
    bring through; save; carry through.
    • We pulled through most of the victims of the bomb attack
WordNet

come through

  • verb penetrate
    break through.
    • The sun broke through the clouds
    • The rescue team broke through the wall in the mine shaft
  • verb succeed in reaching a real or abstract destination after overcoming problems
    come through.
    • We finally got through the bureaucracy and could talk to the Minister
  • verb continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    survive; pull round; make it; come through.
    • He survived the cancer against all odds
  • verb attain success or reach a desired goal
    win; succeed; bring home the bacon; deliver the goods.
    • The enterprise succeeded
    • We succeeded in getting tickets to the show
    • she struggled to overcome her handicap and won
WordNet

cut through

  • verb travel across or pass over
    traverse; track; pass over; get across; cover; cross; get over; cut across.
    • The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day
WordNet

drag through the mud

  • verb speak unfavorably about
    malign; traduce; badmouth.
    • She badmouths her husband everywhere
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fall through

  • verb fail utterly; collapse
    founder; flop; fall flat.
    • The project foundered
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follow through

  • verb carry a stroke to natural completion after hitting or releasing a ball
  • verb pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue
    follow up; follow through; go through; carry out; follow out; implement.
    • Did he go through with the treatment?
    • He implemented a new economic plan
    • She followed up his recommendations with a written proposal
WordNet

follow-through

  • noun carrying some project or intention to full completion
    • I appreciated his follow-through on his promise
  • noun the act of carrying a stroke to its natural completion
    • his follow-through was straight down the line toward the target
    • squash can be dangerous if your opponent has a long follow-through
WordNet

get through

  • verb finish a task completely
    finish up; wrap up; clear up; mop up; polish off; finish off.
    • I finally got through this homework assignment
  • verb spend or pass, as with boredom or in a pleasant manner; of time
    while away.
  • verb succeed in reaching a real or abstract destination after overcoming problems
    come through.
    • We finally got through the bureaucracy and could talk to the Minister
  • verb be in or establish communication with
    contact; reach; get hold of.
    • Our advertisements reach millions
    • He never contacted his children after he emigrated to Australia
  • verb become clear or enter one's consciousness or emotions
    get across; sink in; come home; fall into place; penetrate; dawn; click.
    • It dawned on him that she had betrayed him
    • she was penetrated with sorrow
WordNet

go through

  • verb go or live through
    see; experience.
    • We had many trials to go through
    • he saw action in Viet Nam
  • verb apply thoroughly; think through
    go through; run through.
    • We worked through an example
  • verb go across or through
    go across; pass.
    • We passed the point where the police car had parked
    • A terrible thought went through his mind
  • verb eat immoderately
    down; devour; consume.
    • Some people can down a pound of meat in the course of one meal
  • verb pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue
    follow up; follow through; go through; carry out; follow out; implement.
    • Did he go through with the treatment?
    • He implemented a new economic plan
    • She followed up his recommendations with a written proposal
WordNet

go through the motions

  • verb pretend to do something by acting as if one was really doing it
    • She isn't really working--she's just going through the motions
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luck through

  • verb act by relying on one's luck
    luck it.
WordNet

move through

  • verb make a passage or journey from one place to another
    move through; transit; pass across; pass over.
    • The tourists moved through the town and bought up all the souvenirs
    • "Some travelers pass through the desert
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ooze through

  • verb run slowly and gradually
    • Blood oozed through the bandage
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pass through

  • verb make a passage or journey from one place to another
    move through; transit; pass across; pass over.
    • The tourists moved through the town and bought up all the souvenirs
    • "Some travelers pass through the desert
  • verb cause to move through
    • Pass a chemical through a solution
  • verb pass through an enemy line; in a military conflict
    infiltrate.
WordNet

pass-through

  • noun an opening that resembles a window between two rooms (especially a shelved opening between a kitchen and dining room that is used to pass dishes)
WordNet

plow through

  • to execute a difficult or laborious task steadily, esp. one containing many parts; as, he plowed through the stack of correspondence until all had been answered.
Webster 1913

pull through

  • verb continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    survive; pull round; make it; come through.
    • He survived the cancer against all odds
  • verb bring into safety
    bring through; save; carry through.
    • We pulled through most of the victims of the bomb attack
WordNet

pull-through

  • noun cleaning implement consisting of an oily rag attached by a cord to a weight; is pulled through the barrel of a rifle or handgun to clean it
WordNet

push through

  • verb break out
    erupt; come out; break through.
    • The tooth erupted and had to be extracted
WordNet

put through

  • verb pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue
    follow up; follow through; go through; carry out; follow out; implement.
    • Did he go through with the treatment?
    • He implemented a new economic plan
    • She followed up his recommendations with a written proposal
  • verb connect by telephone
    • the operator put a call through to Rio
WordNet

run through

  • verb apply thoroughly; think through
    go through; run through.
    • We worked through an example
  • verb use up (resources or materials)
    exhaust; consume; wipe out; deplete; use up; eat up; eat.
    • this car consumes a lot of gas
    • We exhausted our savings
    • They run through 20 bottles of wine a week
WordNet

run-through

  • noun an uninterrupted rehearsal
WordNet

sail through

  • verb succeed at easily
    ace; nail; sail through; pass with flying colors; breeze through.
    • She sailed through her exams
    • You will pass with flying colors
    • She nailed her astrophysics course
WordNet

see through

  • verb support financially through a period of time
    • The scholarship saw me through college
    • This money will see me through next month
  • verb perceive the true nature of
    • We could see through her apparent calm
  • verb remain with until completion
    • I must see the job through
WordNet

see-through

  • adjective satellite so thin as to transmit light
    gauze-like; sheer; vaporous; gossamer; cobwebby; vapourous; filmy; diaphanous; transparent; gauzy.
    • a hat with a diaphanous veil
    • filmy wings of a moth
    • gauzy clouds of dandelion down
    • gossamer cobwebs
    • sheer silk stockings
    • transparent chiffon
    • vaporous silks
WordNet

slice through

  • verb move through a body or an object with a slicing motion
    slice into.
    • His hand sliced through the air
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soak through

  • verb be or become thoroughly soaked or saturated with a liquid
    sop.
WordNet

squeak through

  • verb escape
    squeak by.
    • She squeaked by me
WordNet

sweep through

  • verb succeed at easily
    ace; nail; sail through; pass with flying colors; breeze through.
    • She sailed through her exams
    • You will pass with flying colors
    • She nailed her astrophysics course
WordNet

talk through one's hat

  • verb speak insincerely or without regard for facts or truths
    fake; bull; bullshit.
    • The politician was not well prepared for the debate and faked it
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through an experiment

  • adverb in an experimental fashion
    experimentally; by experimentation.
    • this can be experimentally determined
WordNet

through and through

  • adverb throughout the entire extent
    through.
    • got soaked through in the rain
    • I'm frozen through
    • a letter shot through with the writer's personality
    • knew him through and through
    • boards rotten through and through
WordNet

Through bolt

  • a bolt which passes through all the thickness or layers of that which it fastens, or in which it is fixed.
Webster 1913

Through bridge

  • a bridge in which the floor is supported by the lower chords of the tissues instead of the upper, so that travel is between the trusses and not over them. Cf. Deck bridge, under Deck.
Webster 1913

Through cold

  • a deep-seated cold. Obs. Holland.
Webster 1913

through empirical observation

  • adverb in an empirical manner
    by trial and error; empirically.
    • this can be empirically tested
WordNet

Through stone

  • a flat gravestone. Scot. Written also through stane. Sir W. Scott.
Webster 1913

Through ticket

  • a ticket for the whole journey.
Webster 1913

Through train

  • a train which goes the whole length of a railway, or of a long route.
Webster 1913

through with

  • adjective satellite having finished or arrived at completion
    through; done.
    • certain to make history before he's done
    • it's a done deed
    • after the treatment, the patient is through except for follow-up
    • almost through with his studies
  • adjective satellite having no further concern with
    done with.
    • he was through with school and he was through with family"- John Dos Passos
    • done with gambling
    • done with drinking
WordNet

To break through

  • . (a) To make an opening through, as, as by violence or the force of gravity; to pass violently through; as, to break through the enemy's lines; to break through the ice. (b) To disregard; as, to break through the ceremony.
Webster 1913

To carry through

  • . (a) To convey through the midst of. (b) To support to the end; to sustain, or keep from falling, or being subdued. "Grace will carry us . . . through all difficulties." Hammond. (c) To complete; to bring to a succesful issue; to succeed.
Webster 1913

To dream away, out, through

  • etc., to pass in revery or inaction; to spend in idle vagaries; as, to dream away an hour; to dream through life. " Why does Antony dream out his hours?"
Webster 1913

To drop through

  • to fall through; to come to naught; to fail.
Webster 1913

To fall through

  • to come to nothing; to fail; as, the engageent has fallen through.
Webster 1913

To get through

  • . (a) To pass through something. (b) To finish what one was doing.
Webster 1913

To go through

  • . (a) To accomplish; as, to go through a work. (b) To suffer; to endure to the end; as, to go through a surgical operation or a tedious illness. (c) To spend completely; to exhaust, as a fortune. (d) To strip or despoil (one) of his property. Slang (e) To botch or bungle a business. Scot.
Webster 1913

To go through the mill

  • to experience the suffering or discipline necessary to bring one to a certain degree of knowledge or skill, or to a certain mental state.
Webster 1913

To go through with

  • to perform, as a calculation, to the end; to complete.
Webster 1913

To look through

  • . (a) To see through. (b) To search; to examine with the eyes .
Webster 1913

To pull through

  • to come successfully to the end of a difficult undertaking, a dangerous sickness, or the like.
Webster 1913

To put through

  • to cause to go through all conditions or stages of a progress; hence, to push to completion; to accomplish; as, he put through a measure of legislation; he put through a railroad enterprise. U.S.
Webster 1913

To run through

  • . (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate.
  • to transfix; to pierce, as with a sword. "[He] was run through the body by the man who had asked his advice." Addison.
Webster 1913

To see (one) through

  • to help, watch, or guard (one) to the end of a course or an undertaking.
Webster 1913

To thrust through

  • to pierce; to stab. "I am eight times thrust through the doublet." Shak.
Webster 1913

To walk through the fire

  • (Script.), to be exercised with severe afflictions. Isa. xliii. 2.
Webster 1913

walk through

  • verb perform in a perfunctory way, as for a first rehearsal
WordNet

walk-through

  • noun a thorough explanation (usually accompanied by a demonstration) of each step in a procedure or process
    • she gave me a walk-through of my new duties
  • noun a pedestrian passageway through the ground floor of a building
  • noun a first perfunctory rehearsal of a theatrical production in which actors read their lines from the script and move as directed
  • noun the act of walking in order to view something
    • the realtor took her on a walk-through of the apartment
WordNet

whip through

  • verb go through very fast
    • We whipped through the last papers that we had to read before the weekend
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work through

  • verb apply thoroughly; think through
    go through; run through.
    • We worked through an example
WordNet