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take Idioms & Phrases


double take

  • noun a delayed reaction indicating surprise
WordNet

give and take

  • verb make mutual concessions
    • In life you have to give and take
WordNet

give or take

  • adverb plus or minus a small amount
    • it is a mile away, give or take a few hundred yards
WordNet

give-and-take

  • noun an exchange of views on some topic
    word; discussion.
    • we had a good discussion
    • we had a word or two about it
  • noun light teasing repartee
    banter; raillery; backchat.
  • noun mutual interaction; the activity of reciprocating or exchanging (especially information)
    interchange; reciprocation.
WordNet

go for a spin take a spin

  • take a trip in a wheeled vehicle, usu. an automobile.
Webster 1913

leave-taking

  • noun the act of departing politely
    leave; farewell; parting.
    • he disliked long farewells
    • he took his leave
    • parting is such sweet sorrow
WordNet
Leave"-tak`ing noun
Definitions
  1. Taking of leave; parting compliments. Shak.
Webster 1913

nap-taking

Nap"-tak`ing noun
Definitions
  1. A taking by surprise; an unexpected onset or attack. Carew.
Webster 1913

picture taking

  • noun the act of taking and printing photographs
    photography.
WordNet

side-taking

Side"-tak`ing noun
Definitions
  1. A taking sides, as with a party, sect, or faction. Bp. Hall.
Webster 1913

Stock taking

  • an examination and inventory made of goods or stock in a shop or warehouse; usually made periodically.
Webster 1913

stock-take

  • noun an instance of stocktaking
    stocktake.
    • the auditor did not attend the stocktake or check the valuations
  • verb make or include in an itemized record or report
    stock-take; inventory.
    • Inventory all books before the end of the year
WordNet

stock-taking

  • noun reappraisal of a situation or position or outlook
    stocktaking.
  • noun making an itemized list of merchandise or supplies on hand
    inventorying; stocktaking; inventory.
    • an inventory may be necessary to see if anything is missing
    • they held an inventory every month
  • verb make or include in an itemized record or report
    stock-take; inventory.
    • Inventory all books before the end of the year
WordNet

take a bow

  • verb acknowledge praise or accept credit
    • They finally took a bow for what they did
  • verb acknowledge applause by inclining the head, as of an artist after a performance
WordNet

take a breath

  • verb draw air into, and expel out of, the lungs
    breathe; respire; suspire.
    • I can breathe better when the air is clean
    • The patient is respiring
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take a breather

  • verb take a short break from one's activities in order to relax
    breathe; catch one's breath; rest.
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take a chance

  • verb take a risk in the hope of a favorable outcome
    risk; take a chance; hazard; chance; adventure; gamble; run a risk.
    • When you buy these stocks you are gambling
WordNet

take a crap

  • verb have a bowel movement
    crap; defecate; make; stool; ca-ca; take a crap; shit.
    • The dog had made in the flower beds
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take a dare

  • verb be dared to do something and not attempt it
  • verb be dared to do something and attempt it
    pick up the gauntlet.
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take a dive

  • verb pretend to be knocked out, as of a boxer
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take a firm stand

  • verb be emphatic or resolute and refuse to budge
    insist.
    • I must insist!
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take a hit

  • verb inhale through the nose
    snort.
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take a hop

  • verb spring back; spring away from an impact
    spring; rebound; bound; bounce; reverberate; recoil; resile; ricochet.
    • The rubber ball bounced
    • These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide
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take a joke

  • verb listen to a joke at one's own expense
    • Can't you take a joke?
WordNet

take a leak

  • verb eliminate urine
    wee-wee; spend a penny; wee; piddle; micturate; pee-pee; make; pass water; make water; relieve oneself; pee; urinate; puddle; piss.
    • Again, the cat had made on the expensive rug
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take a look

  • verb look at with attention
    get a load; have a look.
    • Have a look at this!
    • Get a load of this pretty woman!
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take a powder

  • verb disappear without notifying anyone (idiom)
    skip town.
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take a shit

  • verb have a bowel movement
    crap; defecate; make; stool; ca-ca; take a crap; shit.
    • The dog had made in the flower beds
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take aback

  • verb surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off
    shock; ball over; blow out of the water; floor.
    • I was floored when I heard that I was promoted
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take account

  • verb be fully aware of; realize fully
    appreciate.
    • Do you appreciate the full meaning of this letter?
WordNet

take advantage

  • verb draw advantages from
    capitalize; capitalise.
    • he is capitalizing on her mistake
    • she took advantage of his absence to meet her lover
  • verb make excessive use of
    trespass.
    • You are taking advantage of my good will!
    • She is trespassing upon my privacy
WordNet

take after

  • verb be similar to a relative
    • She takes after her father!
  • verb imitate in behavior; take as a model
    follow.
    • Teenagers follow their friends in everything
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take aim

  • verb point or cause to go (blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment) towards
    aim; direct; train; take.
    • Please don't aim at your little brother!
    • He trained his gun on the burglar
    • Don't train your camera on the women
    • Take a swipe at one's opponent
WordNet

take apart

  • verb take apart into its constituent pieces
    break up; dismantle; break apart; disassemble.
  • verb divide into pieces
    discerp; dismember.
    • our department was dismembered when our funding dried up
    • The Empire was discerped after the war
  • verb make a mathematical, chemical, or grammatical analysis of; break down into components or essential features
    dissect; analyze; analyse; break down.
    • analyze a specimen
    • analyze a sentence
    • analyze a chemical compound
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take arms

  • verb commence hostilities
    take arms; go to war.
WordNet

take away

  • verb remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional state; transport into a new location or state
    bear off; carry away; carry off; bear away.
    • Their dreams carried the Romantics away into distant lands
    • The car carried us off to the meeting
    • I'll take you away on a holiday
    • I got carried away when I saw the dead man and I started to cry
  • verb remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract
    withdraw; take; remove.
    • remove a threat
    • remove a wrapper
    • Remove the dirty dishes from the table
    • take the gun from your pocket
    • This machine withdraws heat from the environment
  • verb take out or remove
    take away.
    • take out the chicken after adding the vegetables
  • verb take from a person or place
    • We took the abused child away from its parents
  • verb buy and consume food from a restaurant or establishment that sells prepared food
    take away.
    • We'll take out pizza, since I am too tired to cook
  • verb get rid of something abstract
    remove.
    • The death of her mother removed the last obstacle to their marriage
    • God takes away your sins
  • verb take away a part from; diminish
    detract.
    • His bad manners detract from his good character
WordNet

take back

  • verb bring back to the point of departure
    bring back; return.
  • verb regain possession of something
    repossess.
  • verb resume a relationship with someone after an interruption, as in a wife taking back her husband
  • verb move text to the previous line; in printing
  • verb take back what one has said
    swallow; withdraw; unsay.
    • He swallowed his words
  • verb cause someone to remember the past
    • This photo takes me back to the good old days
WordNet

take care

  • verb be careful, prudent, or watchful
    • Take care when you cross the street!
  • verb be in charge of or deal with
    mind.
    • She takes care of all the necessary arrangements
  • verb take charge of or deal with
    see; attend; look.
    • Could you see about lunch?
    • I must attend to this matter
    • She took care of this business
WordNet

take chances

  • verb take a risk in the hope of a favorable outcome
    risk; take a chance; hazard; chance; adventure; gamble; run a risk.
    • When you buy these stocks you are gambling
WordNet

take charge

  • verb assume control
    take charge; take control.
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take control

  • verb assume control
    take charge; take control.
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take down

  • verb move something or somebody to a lower position
    lower; get down; let down; bring down.
    • take down the vase from the shelf
  • verb reduce in worth or character, usually verbally
    demean; disgrace; degrade; put down.
    • She tends to put down younger women colleagues
    • His critics took him down after the lecture
  • verb tear down so as to make flat with the ground
    rase; level; dismantle; pull down; tear down; raze.
    • The building was levelled
  • verb make a written note of
    note.
    • she noted everything the teacher said that morning
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take effect

  • verb go into effect or become effective or operative
    • The new law will take effect next month
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take exception

  • verb raise a formal objection in a court of law
    challenge.
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take fire

  • verb start to burn or burst into flames
    ignite; catch fire; combust; erupt; conflagrate.
    • Marsh gases ignited suddenly
    • The oily rags combusted spontaneously
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take five

  • verb take a break for five minutes
    • The musicians took five during the rehearsal
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take flight

  • verb run away quickly
    fly; flee.
    • He threw down his gun and fled
WordNet

take for

  • verb keep in mind or convey as a conviction or view
    hold; deem; view as.
    • take for granted
    • view as important
    • hold these truths to be self-evident
    • I hold him personally responsible
WordNet

take for granted

  • verb take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof
    assume; presume.
    • I assume his train was late
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take form

  • verb develop into a distinctive entity
    spring; form; take form.
    • our plans began to take shape
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take heart

  • verb gain courage
    buck up.
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take heed

  • verb listen and pay attention
    hear; listen.
    • Listen to your father
    • We must hear the expert before we make a decision
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take hold

  • verb assume control
    take charge; take control.
  • verb have or hold in one's hands or grip
    hold.
    • Hold this bowl for a moment, please
    • A crazy idea took hold of him
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take hold of

  • verb take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of
    catch; grab.
    • Catch the ball!
    • Grab the elevator door!
WordNet

take home

  • verb earn as a salary or wage
    bring home.
    • How much does your wife take home after taxes and other deductions?
WordNet

take in

  • verb provide with shelter
  • verb fool or hoax
    fool; put on; gull; dupe; befool; put one over; cod; put one across; slang.
    • The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone
    • You can't fool me!
  • verb suck or take up or in
    absorb.
    • A black star absorbs all matter
  • verb visit for entertainment
    • take in the sights
  • verb call for and obtain payment of
    collect.
    • we collected over a million dollars in outstanding debts
    • he collected the rent
  • verb see or watch
    catch; see; watch; view.
    • view a show on television
    • This program will be seen all over the world
    • view an exhibition
    • Catch a show on Broadway
    • see a movie
  • verb express willingness to have in one's home or environs
    receive; invite.
    • The community warmly received the refugees
  • verb fold up
    gather in.
    • take in the sails
  • verb take up mentally
    assimilate; absorb; ingest.
    • he absorbed the knowledge or beliefs of his tribe
  • verb earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages
    earn; bring in; clear; pull in; gain; realise; realize; make.
    • How much do you make a month in your new job?
    • She earns a lot in her new job
    • this merger brought in lots of money
    • He clears $5,000 each month
  • verb hear, usually without the knowledge of the speakers
    catch; overhear.
    • We overheard the conversation at the next table
  • verb accept
    take in.
    • The cloth takes up the liquid
  • verb take in, also metaphorically
    draw; imbibe; absorb; soak up; take in; suck up; suck; sop up.
    • The sponge absorbs water well
    • She drew strength from the minister's words
  • verb take up as if with a sponge
    suck in; sop up; take in.
  • verb serve oneself to, or consume regularly
    have; consume; ingest; take.
    • Have another bowl of chicken soup!
    • I don't take sugar in my coffee
  • verb take into one's family
    adopt.
    • They adopted two children from Nicaragua
  • verb make (clothes) smaller
    • Please take in this skirt--I've lost weight
WordNet

take in charge

  • verb accept as a charge
    undertake.
WordNet

take in vain

  • verb use a name, such as God, without proper respect
WordNet

take in water

  • verb take in water at the bilge
    bilge.
    • the tanker bilged
WordNet

take into account

  • verb allow or plan for a certain possibility; concede the truth or validity of something
    allow.
    • I allow for this possibility
    • The seamstress planned for 5% shrinkage after the first wash
WordNet

take issue

  • verb be of different opinions
    dissent; differ; disagree.
    • I beg to differ!
    • She disagrees with her husband on many questions
WordNet

take it easy

  • verb settle into a comfortable sitting position
    sit back.
WordNet

take it on the chin

  • verb undergo failure or defeat
WordNet

take kindly to

  • verb be willing or inclined to accept
    • He did not take kindly to my critical remarks
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take leave

  • verb go away or leave
    quit; depart.
WordNet

take lying down

  • verb suffer without protest; suffer or endure passively
    • I won't take this insult lying down
WordNet

take note

  • verb observe with care or pay close attention to
    note; observe.
    • Take note of this chemical reaction
WordNet

take notice

  • verb observe with special attention
    • Take notice of the great architecture
WordNet

take off

  • verb leave
    depart; set forth; set off; start out; start; part; set out.
    • The family took off for Florida
  • verb take away or remove
    • Take that weight off me!
  • verb depart from the ground
    lift off.
    • The plane took off two hours late
  • verb take time off from work; stop working temporarily
    take off.
  • verb mimic or imitate in an amusing or satirical manner
    • This song takes off from a famous aria
  • verb remove clothes
    • take off your shirt--it's very hot in here
  • verb get started or set in motion, used figuratively
    get off the ground.
    • the project took a long time to get off the ground
  • verb prove fatal
    • The disease took off
  • verb make a subtraction
    deduct; subtract.
    • subtract this amount from my paycheck
WordNet

take office

  • verb assume an office, duty, or title
    • When will the new President take office?
WordNet

take on

  • verb take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect
    assume; acquire; take; adopt.
    • His voice took on a sad tone
    • The story took a new turn
    • he adopted an air of superiority
    • She assumed strange manners
    • The gods assume human or animal form in these fables
  • verb take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities
    assume; take on; adopt.
    • When will the new President assume office?
  • verb accept as a challenge
    tackle; undertake.
    • I'll tackle this difficult task
  • verb admit into a group or community
    admit; take; accept.
    • accept students for graduate study
    • We'll have to vote on whether or not to admit a new member
  • verb contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle
    meet; play; encounter.
    • Princeton plays Yale this weekend
    • Charlie likes to play Mary
WordNet

take one's lumps

  • verb suffer the results or consequences of one's behavior or actions
    get one's lumps.
WordNet

take orders

  • verb receive and be expected to follow directions or commands
    • I don't take orders from you!
  • verb be ordained; enter the Christian ministry
    • She took orders last month
WordNet

take out

  • verb cause to leave
    remove; move out.
    • The teacher took the children out of the classroom
  • verb remove from its packing
    unpack.
    • unpack the presents
  • verb take out or remove
    take away.
    • take out the chicken after adding the vegetables
  • verb obtain by legal or official process
    • take out a license
    • take out a patent
  • verb make a date
    invite out; ask out.
    • Has he asked you out yet?
  • verb remove something from a container or an enclosed space
  • verb purchase prepared food to be eaten at home
    buy food.
  • verb remove (a commodity) from (a supply source)
    draw; draw off; withdraw.
    • She drew $2,000 from the account
    • The doctors drew medical supplies from the hospital's emergency bank
  • verb bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover
    pull; draw; pull out; get out.
    • draw a weapon
    • pull out a gun
    • The mugger pulled a knife on his victim
  • verb take liquid out of a container or well
    draw.
    • She drew water from the barrel
  • verb remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense
    pull; pull out; pull up; draw out; extract.
    • pull weeds
    • extract a bad tooth
    • take out a splinter
    • extract information from the telegram
  • verb buy and consume food from a restaurant or establishment that sells prepared food
    take away.
    • We'll take out pizza, since I am too tired to cook
  • verb take out of a literary work in order to cite or copy
    extract; excerpt.
  • verb prevent from being included or considered or accepted
    omit; except; leave off; leave out; exclude.
    • The bad results were excluded from the report
    • Leave off the top piece
WordNet

take over

  • verb seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession
    assume; arrogate; usurp; seize.
    • He assumed to himself the right to fill all positions in the town
    • he usurped my rights
    • She seized control of the throne after her husband died
  • verb take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities
    assume; take on; adopt.
    • When will the new President assume office?
  • verb free someone temporarily from his or her obligations
    relieve.
  • verb take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person
    assume; accept; bear.
    • I'll accept the charges
    • She agreed to bear the responsibility
  • verb take over ownership of; of corporations and companies
    buy out; buy up.
  • verb do over
    repeat.
    • They would like to take it over again
  • verb take up and practice as one's own
    take over; adopt; borrow.
  • verb take up, as of debts or payments
    absorb.
    • absorb the costs for something
WordNet

take pains

  • verb try very hard to do something
    be at pains.
WordNet

take part

  • verb share in something
    participate.
WordNet

take place

  • verb come to pass
    fall out; pass off; come about; pass; hap; happen; occur; go on.
    • What is happening?
    • The meeting took place off without an incidence
    • Nothing occurred that seemed important
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take pride

  • verb feel proud of
    pride oneself.
    • She took great pride in her sons
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take root

  • verb become settled or established and stable in one's residence or life style
    settle; root; steady down; settle down.
    • He finally settled down
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take shape

  • verb develop into a distinctive entity
    spring; form; take form.
    • our plans began to take shape
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take stage

  • verb attract attention onto oneself
    take stage.
WordNet

take stock

  • verb to look at critically or searchingly, or in minute detail
    size up; scrutinize; scrutinise.
    • he scrutinized his likeness in the mirror
  • verb make or include in an itemized record or report
    stock-take; inventory.
    • Inventory all books before the end of the year
WordNet

take ten

  • verb take a ten minute break
    • The players took ten during the long rehearsal
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take the air

  • verb take a walk; go for a walk; walk for pleasure
    walk.
    • The lovers held hands while walking
    • We like to walk every Sunday
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take the bull by the horns

  • verb face a difficulty and grapple with it without avoiding it
WordNet

take the cake

  • verb rank first; used often in a negative context
    • He takes the cake for chutzpah!
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take the count

  • verb be counted out; remain down while the referee counts to ten
    remain down.
WordNet

take the field

  • verb go on a campaign; go off to war
    campaign.
  • verb go on the playing field, of a football team
WordNet

take the fifth

  • verb refuse to testify by invoking the Fifth Amendment, which states that nobody may be forced to testify as a witness against himself or herself
    take the Fifth.
WordNet

take the fifth amendment

  • verb refuse to testify by invoking the Fifth Amendment, which states that nobody may be forced to testify as a witness against himself or herself
    take the Fifth.
WordNet

take the floor

  • verb stand up to dance
  • verb rise in order to make a speech or motion
WordNet

take the road

  • verb give theatrical performances while traveling from town to town
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take the stage

  • verb attract attention onto oneself
    take stage.
WordNet

take the stand

  • verb give testimony in a court of law
    bear witness; attest; testify.
WordNet

take the veil

  • verb become a nun
    • The young woman took the veil after her fiance died
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take time by the forelock

  • verb act quickly and decisively; not let slip an opportunity
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take time off

  • verb take time off from work; stop working temporarily
    take off.
WordNet

take to

  • verb have a fancy or particular liking or desire for
    go for; fancy.
    • She fancied a necklace that she had seen in the jeweler's window
  • verb develop a habit; apply oneself to a practice or occupation
    • She took to drink
    • Men take to the military trades
WordNet

take to be

  • verb look on as or consider
    regard as; look upon; think of; esteem; look on; repute.
    • she looked on this affair as a joke
    • He thinks of himself as a brilliant musician
    • He is reputed to be intelligent
WordNet

take to heart

  • verb get down to; pay attention to; take seriously
    attend to.
    • Attend to your duties, please
WordNet

take to task

  • verb censure severely or angrily
    call on the carpet; rag; dress down; remonstrate; chew out; call down; jaw; lambast; trounce; scold; chide; berate; chew up; have words; rebuke; reprimand; reproof; lecture; bawl out; lambaste.
    • The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car
    • The deputy ragged the Prime Minister
    • The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup
WordNet

take to the woods

  • verb flee; take to one's heels; cut and run
    lam; run; head for the hills; hightail it; bunk; run away; scarper; escape; fly the coop; break away; scat; turn tail.
    • If you see this man, run!
    • The burglars escaped before the police showed up
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take turns

  • verb do something in turns
    alternate.
    • We take turns on the night shift
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take up

  • verb pursue or resume
    • take up a matter for consideration
  • verb adopt
    fasten on; hook on; seize on; latch on.
    • take up new ideas
  • verb turn one's interest to
    • He took up herpetology at the age of fifty
  • verb take up time or space
    • take up the slack
  • verb begin work or acting in a certain capacity, office or job
    start.
    • Take up a position
    • start a new job
  • verb take up and practice as one's own
    take over; adopt; borrow.
  • verb occupy or take on
    assume; strike; take.
    • He assumes the lotus position
    • She took her seat on the stage
    • We took our seats in the orchestra
    • She took up her position behind the tree
    • strike a pose
  • verb take up a liquid or a gas either by adsorption or by absorption
    sorb.
  • verb take out or up with or as if with a scoop
    scoop out; scoop; scoop up; lift out.
    • scoop the sugar out of the container
  • verb accept
    take in.
    • The cloth takes up the liquid
  • verb take in, also metaphorically
    draw; imbibe; absorb; soak up; take in; suck up; suck; sop up.
    • The sponge absorbs water well
    • She drew strength from the minister's words
  • verb take up as if with a sponge
    suck in; sop up; take in.
  • verb return to a previous location or condition
    resume.
    • The painting resumed its old condition when we restored it
WordNet

take up arms

  • verb commence hostilities
    take arms; go to war.
WordNet

take water

  • verb enter the water
    • the wild ducks took water
WordNet

take-away

  • adjective satellite of or involving food to be taken and eaten off the premises
    takeout.
    • takeout pizza
    • the takeout counter
    • `take-away' is chiefly British
WordNet

take-home

  • adjective satellite (of salary or wages) remaining after all deductions including taxes
WordNet

take-home pay

  • noun what is left of your pay after deductions for taxes and dues and insurance etc
WordNet

take-in

  • noun the act of taking in as by fooling or cheating or swindling someone
WordNet
Take"-in` noun
Definitions
  1. Imposition; fraud. Colloq.
Webster 1913

take-off

Take"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. An imitation, especially in the way of caricature.
Webster 1913

take-up

  • noun any of various devices for reducing slack (as in a sewing machine) or taking up motion (as in a loom)
    • a take-up that winds photographic film on a spool
  • noun the action of taking up as by tightening or absorption or reeling in
WordNet
Take"-up` noun
Definitions
  1. (Mach.) That which takes up or tightens; specifically, a device in a sewing machine for drawing up the slack thread as the needle rises, in completing a stitch.
Webster 1913

taken for granted

  • adjective satellite evident without proof or argument
    self-evident; axiomatic.
    • an axiomatic truth
    • we hold these truths to be self-evident
WordNet

taken up

  • adjective satellite having or showing excessive or compulsive concern with something
    preoccupied; haunted; obsessed.
    • became more and more haunted by the stupid riddle
    • was absolutely obsessed with the girl
    • got no help from his wife who was preoccupied with the children
    • he was taken up in worry for the old woman
WordNet

taken with

  • adjective satellite marked by foolish or unreasoning fondness
    infatuated; smitten; enamored; potty; in love; soft on.
    • gaga over the rock group's new album
    • he was infatuated with her
WordNet

taking apart

  • noun the removal of limbs; being cut to pieces
    dismemberment.
WordNet

taking hold

  • noun the act of gripping something firmly with the hands (or the tentacles)
    grasping; seizing; prehension.
WordNet

taking into custody

  • noun the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal)
    apprehension; pinch; arrest; catch; collar.
    • the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar
WordNet

taking over

  • noun acquisition of property by descent or by will
    succession.
WordNet

taking-off

Tak"ing-off` noun
Definitions
  1. Removal; murder. See To take off (c), under Take, v. t.
    The deep damnation of his taking-off. Shak.
Webster 1913

To be taken in, ∨ with the manner

  • . A corruption of to be taken in the mainor. See Mainor. To be taken in the very act. Obs. See Mainor.
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To be taken aback

  • . (a) To be driven backward against the mast; said of the sails, also of the ship when the sails are thus driven. (b) To be suddenly checked, baffled, or discomfited.
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To be taken aback, To take advantage of, To take air, etc.

  • See under Aback, Advantage, etc.
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To give and take

  • . (a) To average gains and losses. (b) To exchange freely, as blows, sarcasms, etc.
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To give to wife, To take to wife

  • to give or take (a woman) in marriage.
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To go on the stump, ∨ To take the stump

  • to engage in making public addresses for electioneering purposes; a phrase derived from the practice of using a stump for a speaker's platform in newly-settled districts. Hence also the phrases stump orator, stump speaker, stump speech, stump oratory, etc. Colloq. U.S.
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To join, ∨ take, issue

  • to take opposing sides in a matter in controversy.
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To strike root, To take root

  • to send forth roots; to become fixed in the earth, etc., by a root; hence, in general, to become planted, fixed, or established; to increase and spread; as, an opinion takes root. "The bended twigs take root." Milton.
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To take time, ∨ occasion, by the forelock

  • to make prompt use of anything; not to let slip an opportunity.
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To take (an act, thing) amiss

  • to impute a wrong motive to (an act or thing); to take offense at' to take unkindly; as, you must not take these questions amiss.
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To take, ∨ have, the law of

  • to bring the law to bear upon; as, to take the law of one's neighbor. Addison.
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To take, ∨ have, the wind

  • to gain or have the advantage. Bacon.
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To take a departure

  • (Nav. & Surv.), to ascertain, usually by taking bearings from a landmark, the position of a vessel at the beginning of a voyage as a point from which to begin her dead reckoning; as, the ship took her departure from Sandy Hook.
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To take a horn

  • to take a drink of intoxicating liquor. Low
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To take a name in vain

  • to use a name lightly or profanely; to use a name in making flippant or dishonest oaths. Ex. xx. 7.
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To take a newspaper, magazine, or the like

  • to receive it regularly, as on paying the price of subscription.
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To take a reef in

  • to reduce the size of (a sail) by folding or rolling up a reef, and lashing it to the spar.
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To take a shoot

  • to pass through a shoot instead of the main channel; to take the most direct course. U.S.
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To take account of, or to take into account

  • to take into consideration; to notice.
    "Of their doings, God takes no account." Milton
    .
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To take acquaintance of or with

  • to make the acquaintance of. Obs.
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To take advantage of

  • to profit by; (often used in a bad sense) to overreach, to outwit.
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To take advice

  • . (a) To accept advice. (b) To consult with another or others.
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To take after

  • . (a) To learn to follow; to copy; to imitate; as, he takes after a good pattern. (b) To resemble; as, the son takes after his father.
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To take aim

  • to direct the eye or weapon; to aim.
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To take air

  • to be divulged; to be made public.
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To take along

  • to carry, lead, or convey.
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To take an observation

  • (Naut.), to ascertain the altitude of a heavenly body, with a view to fixing a vessel's position at sea.
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To take arms

  • to commence war or hostilities.
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To take away

  • to carry off; to remove; to cause deprivation of; to do away with; as, a bill for taking away the votes of bishops. "By your own law, I take your life away." Dryden.
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To take bearings

  • to ascertain by the compass the position of an object; to ascertain the relation of one object or place to another; to ascertain one's position by reference to landmarks or to the compass; hence  to ascertain the condition of things when one is in trouble or perplexity.
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To take breath

  • to stop, as from labor, in order to breathe or rest; to recruit or refresh one's self.
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To take care

  • to exercise care or vigilance; to be solicitous. "Doth God take care for oxen?" 1 Cor. ix. 9.
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To take care of

  • to have the charge or care of; to care for; to superintend or oversee.
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To take check

  • to take offense. Obs. Dryden.
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To take down

  • . (a) To reduce; to bring down, as from a high, or higher, place; as, to take down a book; hence, to bring lower; to depress; to abase or humble; as, to take down pride, or the proud . "I never attempted to be impudent yet, that I was not taken down." Goldsmith. (b) To swallow; as, to take down a potion. (c) To pull down; to pull to pieces; as, to take down a house or a scaffold . (d) To record; to write down; as, to take down a man's words at the time he utters them.
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To take effect

  • to become operative, to accomplish aims. Shak.
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To take effect, To take fire

  • . See under Effect, and Fire.
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To take fire

  • to begin to burn; to fly into a passion.
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To take ground to the rightto the left

  • (Mil.), to extend the line to the right or left; to move, as troops, to the right or left.
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To take heart

  • to gain confidence or courage; to be encouraged.
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To take heart of grace

  • to take courage.
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To take heed

  • to be careful or cautious. "Take heed what doom against yourself you give." Dryden.
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To take heed to

  • to attend with care, as, take heed to thy ways.
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To take hold of

  • to seize; to fix on.
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To take horse

  • . (a) To set out on horseback. Macaulay. (b) To be covered, as a mare. (c) See definition 7 (above).
  • to mount and ride a horse.
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To take huff

  • to take offence.
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To take in

  • . (a) To inclose; to fence . (b) To encompass or embrace; to comprise; to comprehend . (c) To draw into a smaller compass; to contract; to brail or furl; as, to take in sail . (d) To cheat; to circumvent; to gull; to deceive . Colloq. (e) To admit; to receive; as, a leaky vessel will take in water. (f) To win by conquest . Obs.
    For now Troy's broad-wayed town He shall take in. Chapman.
    (g) To receive into the mind or understanding. "Some bright genius can take in a long train of propositions." I. Watts. (h) To receive regularly, as a periodical work or newspaper; to take. Eng.
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To take in hand

  • . (a) To attempt or undertake . (b) To seize and deal with; as, he took him in hand.
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To take in vain

  • to employ or utter as in an oath. "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain." Ex. xx. 7.
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To take in with

  • to resort to. Obs. Bacon.
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To take into one's confidence

  • to admit to a knowledge of one's feelings, purposes, or affairs.
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To take issue

  • . See under Issue.
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To take it in snuff

  • to be angry or offended. Shak.
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To take keep

  • to take care; to heed. Obs. Chaucer.
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To take leave

  • . See Leave, n., 2.
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To take measures

  • to make preparations; to provide means.
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To take notice

  • to observe, or to observe with particular attention.
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To take notice of

  • to perceive especially; to observe or treat with particular attention.
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To take oath

  • to swear with solemnity, or in a judicial manner.
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To take off

  • . (a) To remove, as from the surface or outside; to remove from the top of anything; as, to take off a load; to take off one's hat. (b) To cut off; as, to take off the head, or a limb . (c) To destroy; as, to take off life . (d) To remove; to invalidate; as, to take off the force of an argument . (e) To withdraw; to call or draw away . Locke. (f) To swallow; as, to take off a glass of wine. (g) To purchase; to take in trade . "The Spaniards having no commodities that we will take off." Locke. (h) To copy; to reproduce. "Take off all their models in wood." Addison. (i) To imitate; to mimic; to personate. (k) To find place for; to dispose of; as, more scholars than preferments can take off. R. Bacon. to begin to fly; said of an airplane, or of a person operating an airplane or other flying device.
  • to mimic or personate. also, to take off on, to do a take-off on
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To take offense

  • to feel, or assume to be, injured or affronted; to become angry or hostile.
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To take on

  • to assume; to take upon one's self; as, to take on a character or responsibility.
  • to be violently affected; to express grief or pain in a violent manner.
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To take one's measure

  • to measure one, as for a garment; hence, to form an opinion of one's disposition, character, ability, etc.
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To take one's own course

  • to act one's pleasure; to pursue the measures of one's own choice.
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To take order for

  • to take charge of; to make arrangements concerning.
    Whiles I take order for mine own affairs. Shak.
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To take order with

  • to check; to hinder; to repress. Obs. Bacon.
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To take orders

  • . (a) To receive directions or commands. (b) (Eccl.) To enter some grade of the ministry. See Order, n., 10.
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To take out

  • . (a) To remove from within a place; to separate; to deduct. (b) To draw out; to remove; to clear or cleanse from; as, to take out a stain or spot from cloth . (c) To produce for one's self; as, to take out a patent . (d) To put an end to; as, to take the conceit out of a man . (e) To escort; as, to take out to dinner. usu. paying the expenses
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To take over

  • to undertake; to take the management of. Eng. Cross (Life of G. Eliot).
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To take part

  • to share; as, they take part in our rejoicing.
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To take part with

  • to unite with; to join with. take part in = participate in
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To take place

  • . (a) To come to pass; to occur; as, the ceremony will not take place. (b) To take precedence or priority. Addison. (c) To take effect; to prevail. "If your doctrine takes place." Berkeley. "But none of these excuses would take place." Spenser.
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To take place, root, sides, stock, etc.

  • See under Place, Root, Side, etc.
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To take pleasure in

  • to have enjoyment in. Ps. cxlvii. 11.
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To take possession

  • to enter upon, or to bring within one's power or occupancy.
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To take potluck

  • to take what food may chance to be provided.
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To take rank of

  • to have precedence over, or to have the right of taking a higher place than.
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To take shape

  • to assume a definite form.
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To take shipping

  • to embark; to take ship. Obs. John vi.24. Shak.
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To take sides

  • to attach one's self to, or give assistance to, one of two opposing sides or parties.
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To take sight

  • to take aim; to look for the purpose of directing a piece of artillery, or the like.
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To take soil

  • to run into the mire or water; hence, to take refuge or shelter.
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To take steps

  • to take action; to move in a matter.
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To take stock

  • to take account of stock; to make an inventory of stock or goods on hand. Dickens.
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To take stock in

  • . (a) To subscribe for, or purchase, shares in a stock company. (b) To put faith in; to accept as trustworthy; as, to take stock in a person's fidelity . Slang
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To take stock of

  • to take account of the stock of; to take an inventory of; hence, to ascertain the facts in regard to (something). Eng.
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To take the air

  • to go abroad; to walk or ride out.
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To take the back track

  • to retrace one's steps; to retreat. Colloq.
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To take the bull by the horns

  • to grapple with a difficulty instead of avoiding it.
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To take the chair

  • to assume the position of president, or of chairman of a meeting.
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To take the field

  • (Mil.), to enter upon a campaign.
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To take the ground

  • to touch bottom or become stranded; said of a ship.
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To take the name of God in vain

  • to use the name of God with levity or profaneness.
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To take the place of

  • to be substituted for.
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To take the reins

  • to take the guidance or government; to assume control.
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To take the road

  • to begin or engage in traveling.
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To take the trouble

  • to be at the pains; to exert one's self; to give one's self inconvenience.
    She never took the trouble to close them. Bryant.
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To take the veil

  • (Eccl.), to receive or be covered with, a veil, as a nun, in token of retirement from the world; to become a nun.
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To take the wall

  • . to take the inner side of a walk, that is, the side next the wall; hence, to take the precedence. "I will take the wall of any man or maid of Montague's." Shak.
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To take the wind out of one's sails

  • to cause one to stop, or lose way, as when a vessel intercepts the wind of another. Colloq.
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To take thought

  • to be concerned or anxious; to be solicitous. Matt. vi. 25, 27.
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To take to

  • . (a) To apply one's self to; to be fond of; to become attached to; as, to take to evil practices.
    "If he does but take to you, . . . you will contract a great friendship with him." Walpole.
    (b) To resort to; to betake one's self to.
    "Men of learning, who take to business, discharge it generally with greater honesty than men of the world." Addison.
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To take to heart

  • to grieve over.
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To take to task

  • to reprove; to censure.
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to take to the air

  • to take off.
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To take to the heels

  • to flee; to betake to flight.
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To take to the road

  • to engage in robbery upon the highways.
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To take turns

  • to alternate; to succeed one another in due order.
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To take up

  • . (a) To lift; to raise. Hood. (b) To buy or borrow; as, to take up goods to a large amount; to take up money at the bank. (c) To begin; as, to take up a lamentation . Ezek. xix. 1. (d) To gather together; to bind up; to fasten or to replace; as, to take up raveled stitches ; specifically (Surg.), to fasten with a ligature. (e) To engross; to employ; to occupy or fill; as, to take up the time; to take up a great deal of room . (f) To take permanently . "Arnobius asserts that men of the finest parts . . . took up their rest in the Christian religion." Addison. (g) To seize; to catch; to arrest; as, to take up a thief; to take up vagabonds. (h) To admit; to believe; to receive. Obs.
    The ancients took up experiments upon credit. Bacon.
    (i) To answer by reproof; to reprimand; to berate.
    One of his relations took him up roundly. L'Estrange.
    (k) To begin where another left off; to keep up in continuous succession.
    Soon as the evening shades prevail, The moon takes up the wondrous tale. Addison.
    The second volume takes up where the first left off. (l) To assume; to adopt as one's own; to carry on or manage; as, to take up the quarrels of our neighbors; to take up current opinions. "They take up our old trade of conquering." Dryden. (m) To comprise; to include. "The noble poem of Palemon and Arcite . . . takes up seven years." Dryden. (n) To receive, accept, or adopt for the purpose of assisting; to espouse the cause of; to favor. Ps. xxvii. 10. (o) To collect; to exact, as a tax; to levy; as, to take up a contribution. "Take up commodities upon our bills." Shak. (p) To pay and receive; as, to take up a note at the bank. (q) (Mach.) To remove, as by an adjustment of parts; as, to take up lost motion, as in a bearing; also, to make tight, as by winding, or drawing; as, to take up slack thread in sewing . (r) To make up; to compose; to settle; as, to take up a quarrel . Obs. Shak. (s) To accept from someone, as a wager or a challenge. "J. took M. up on his challenge."
  • . (a) To stop. Obs.
    "Sinners at last take up and settle in a contempt of religion." Tillotson
    . (b) To reform. Obs. Locke.
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To take up arms

  • . Same as To take arms, above.
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To take up cudgels for

  • to engage in a contest in behalf of (some one or something).
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To take up the cross

  • to bear troubles and afflictions with patience from love to Christ.
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To take up the gauntlet

  • to accept a challenge.
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To take up the glove

  • to accept a challenge or adopt a quarrel.
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To take up the hatchet

  • to make or declare war. The last two phrases are derived from the practice of the American Indians.
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To take up with

  • . (a) To be contended to receive; to receive without opposition; to put up with; as, to take up with plain fare .
    "In affairs which may have an extensive influence on our future happiness, we should not take up with probabilities." I. Watts.
    (b) To lodge with; to dwell with. Obs. L'Estrange.
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To take upon

  • to assume.
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To take upon one's self

  • . (a) To assume; to undertake; as, he takes upon himself to assert that the fact is capable of proof. (b) To appropriate to one's self; to allow to be imputed to, or inflicted upon, one's self; as, to take upon one's self a punishment .
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To take vent

  • to escape; to be made public. R.
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To take wind

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To take with

  • to please. Bacon.
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