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run Idioms & Phrases


also-ran

  • noun a contestant who loses the contest
    loser.
WordNet

As thing run

  • according to the usual order, conditions, quality, etc.; on the average; without selection or specification.
Webster 1913

At long running

  • in the long run. Obs. Jer. Taylor.
Webster 1913

At the long run, now, commonly, In the long run

  • in or during the whole process or course of things taken together; in the final result; in the end; finally.
    [Man] starts the inferior of the brute animals, but he surpasses them in the long run. J. H. Newman.
Webster 1913

bank run

  • noun the concerted action of depositors who try to withdraw their money from a bank because they think it will fail
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battle of bull run

  • noun either of two battles during the American Civil War (1861 and 1862); Confederate forces defeated the Federal army in both battles
    Battle of Bull Run.
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bombing run

  • noun that part of the flight that begins with the approach to the target; includes target acquisition and ends with the release of the bombs
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bull run

  • noun a creek in northeastern Virginia where two battles were fought in the American Civil War
  • noun either of two battles during the American Civil War (1861 and 1862); Confederate forces defeated the Federal army in both battles
    Battle of Bull Run.
WordNet

By the run

  • to let go by the run, to let go altogether, instead of slacking off.
Webster 1913

Cattle range, ∨ Cattle run

  • an open space through which cattle may run or range. U. S. Bartlett.
Webster 1913

chicken run

  • noun an enclosed yard for keeping poultry
    hen yard; chicken yard; chicken run.
WordNet

dry run

  • noun a practice session in preparation for a public performance (as of a play or speech or concert)
    rehearsal.
    • he missed too many rehearsals
    • a rehearsal will be held the day before the wedding
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Earned run

  • noun a run that was not scored as the result of an error by the other team
WordNet
  • (Baseball), a run which is made without the assistance of errors on the opposing side.
Webster 1913

earned run average

  • noun (baseball) a measure of a pitcher's effectiveness; calculated as the average number of earned runs allowed by the pitcher for every nine innings pitched
    ERA.
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end run

  • noun (American football) an attempt to advance the ball by running around the end of the line
    sweep.
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fowl run

  • noun an enclosed yard for keeping poultry
    hen yard; chicken yard; chicken run.
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fun run

  • noun a footrace run for fun (often including runners who are sponsored for a charity)
    funrun.
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Hand running

  • consecutively; as, he won ten times hand running.
Webster 1913

Hard pushed, Hard run

  • greatly pressed; as, he was hard pushed or hard run for time, money, etc. Colloq.
Webster 1913

hit-and-run

  • adjective satellite designed for or consisting of a brief attack followed by a quick escape
    hit-and-run.
    • hit-and-run units
    • tip-and-run assaults
  • adjective satellite involving a driver of a motor vehicle who leaves the scene of an accident
WordNet

Home run

  • noun a base hit on which the batter scores a run
    homer.
  • noun something that exactly succeeds in achieving its goal
    bull's eye; bell ringer; mark.
    • the new advertising campaign was a bell ringer
    • scored a bull's eye
    • hit the mark
    • the president's speech was a home run
WordNet
  • (Baseball), a complete circuit of the bases made before the batted ball is returned to the home base.
Webster 1913

Horse run

  • (Civil Engin.), a device for drawing loaded wheelbarrows up an inclined plane by horse power.
Webster 1913

In the long run

  • adverb after a very lengthy period of time
    in the end.
    • she will succeed in the long run
WordNet
  • in the whole course of things taken together; in the ultimate result; eventually.
Webster 1913

long run

  • noun a period of time sufficient for factors to work themselves out
    long haul.
    • in the long run we will win
    • in the long run we will all be dead
    • he performed well over the long haul
WordNet

long-run

  • adjective satellite relating to or extending over a relatively long time
    long-term; semipermanent.
    • the long-run significance of the elections
    • the long-term reconstruction of countries damaged by the war
    • a long-term investment
WordNet

Mile run

  • . Same as Train mile. See under Train.
Webster 1913

mine run

  • adjective satellite not special in any way
    mine run; unexceptional; run-of-the-mill.
    • run-of-the-mill boxing
    • your run-of-the-mine college graduate
    • a unexceptional an incident as can be found in a lawyer's career
WordNet

pit run

  • noun gravel as found in natural deposits
    pit run; bank gravel.
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pit-run gravel

  • noun gravel as found in natural deposits
    pit run; bank gravel.
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press run

  • noun the period that presses run to produce an issue of a newspaper
    press run.
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  • noun the period that presses run to produce an issue of a newspaper
    press run.
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right-running

Right"-run`ning adjective
Definitions
  1. Straight; direct.
Webster 1913

run a risk

  • verb take a risk in the hope of a favorable outcome
    risk; take a chance; hazard; take chances; chance; adventure; gamble.
    • When you buy these stocks you are gambling
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run across

  • verb come together
    see; come across; meet; run across; encounter.
    • I'll probably see you at the meeting
    • How nice to see you again!
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run afoul

  • verb go against, as of rules and laws
    infringe; conflict; contravene.
    • He ran afoul of the law
    • This behavior conflicts with our rules
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run aground

  • verb bring to the ground
    strand; ground.
    • the storm grounded the ship
  • verb hit or reach the ground
    ground.
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run along

  • verb be in line with; form a line along
    line.
    • trees line the riverbank
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run around

  • verb play boisterously
    disport; rollick; cavort; romp; skylark; sport; frisk; lark; lark about; frolic; gambol.
    • The children frolicked in the garden
    • the gamboling lambs in the meadows
    • The toddlers romped in the playroom
WordNet

run away

  • verb flee; take to one's heels; cut and run
    lam; run; head for the hills; hightail it; bunk; take to the woods; scarper; escape; fly the coop; break away; scat; turn tail.
    • If you see this man, run!
    • The burglars escaped before the police showed up
  • verb escape from the control of
    • Industry is running away with us all
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run bases

  • verb run around the bases, in baseball
WordNet

run batted in

  • noun a run that is the result of the batter's performance
    rbi.
    • he had more than 100 rbi last season
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run by

  • verb pass by while running
    • We watched children were running by
WordNet

run down

  • verb trace
    check out.
    • We are running down a few tips
  • verb move downward
    • The water ran down
  • verb injure or kill by running over, as with a vehicle
    run down.
  • verb use up all one's strength and energy and stop working
    peter out; poop out; run down; conk out.
    • At the end of the march, I pooped out
  • verb examine hastily
    glance over; rake; skim; scan.
    • She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi
  • verb deplete
    exhaust; play out; sap; tire.
    • exhaust one's savings
    • We quickly played out our strength
  • verb pursue until captured
    • They ran down the fugitive
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run dry

  • verb become empty of water
    dry out.
    • The river runs dry in the summer
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run for

  • verb extend or continue for a certain period of time
    run.
    • The film runs 5 hours
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run into

  • verb be beset by
    encounter.
    • The project ran into numerous financial difficulties
  • verb collide violently with an obstacle
    jar against; butt against; bump into; knock against.
    • I ran into the telephone pole
  • verb hit against; come into sudden contact with
    strike; hit; collide with; impinge on.
    • The car hit a tree
    • He struck the table with his elbow
  • verb come together
    see; come across; meet; run across; encounter.
    • I'll probably see you at the meeting
    • How nice to see you again!
WordNet

run low

  • verb to be spent or finished
    go; run low.
    • The money had gone after a few days
    • Gas is running low at the gas stations in the Midwest
WordNet

run off

  • verb run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    abscond; make off; absquatulate; decamp; bolt; go off.
    • The thief made off with our silver
    • the accountant absconded with the cash from the safe
  • verb leave suddenly and as if in a hurry
    bolt out; bolt; run off; beetle off.
    • The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas
    • When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out
  • verb force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings
    turn back; drive out; dispel; drive away; chase away; drive off.
    • Drive away potential burglars
    • drive away bad thoughts
    • dispel doubts
    • The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers
  • verb run away secretly with one's beloved
    elope.
    • The young couple eloped and got married in Las Vegas
  • verb run off as waste
    waste.
    • The water wastes back into the ocean
  • verb reproduce by xerography
    photocopy; xerox.
  • verb decide (a contest or competition) by a runoff
WordNet

run on

  • verb talk or narrate at length
  • verb continue uninterrupted
    keep going.
    • The disease will run on unchecked
    • The party kept going until 4 A.M.
WordNet

run out

  • verb become used up; be exhausted
    • Our supplies finally ran out
  • verb flow off gradually
    drain.
    • The rain water drains into this big vat
  • verb leave suddenly and as if in a hurry
    bolt out; bolt; run off; beetle off.
    • The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas
    • When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out
  • verb lose validity
    expire.
    • My passports expired last month
  • verb flow, run or fall out and become lost
    spill.
    • The milk spilled across the floor
    • The wine spilled onto the table
  • verb exhaust the supply of
    • We ran out of time just as the discussion was getting interesting
  • verb prove insufficient
    fail; give out.
    • The water supply for the town failed after a long drought
  • verb use up all one's strength and energy and stop working
    peter out; poop out; run down; conk out.
    • At the end of the march, I pooped out
WordNet

run over

  • verb injure or kill by running over, as with a vehicle
    run down.
  • verb flow or run over (a limit or brim)
    overflow; well over; brim over; overrun.
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run roughshod

  • verb treat inconsiderately or harshly
    ride roughshod.
WordNet

run short

  • verb to be spent or finished
    go; run low.
    • The money had gone after a few days
    • Gas is running low at the gas stations in the Midwest
WordNet

Run steel

  • malleable iron castings. See under Malleable.
Webster 1913

run through

  • verb apply thoroughly; think through
    work through; go through.
    • We worked through an example
  • verb use up (resources or materials)
    exhaust; consume; wipe out; deplete; use up; eat up; eat.
    • this car consumes a lot of gas
    • We exhausted our savings
    • They run through 20 bottles of wine a week
WordNet

run up

  • verb pile up (debts or scores)
  • verb raise
    hoist.
    • hoist the flags
    • hoist a sail
  • verb fasten by sewing; do needlework
    sew; sew together; stitch.
  • verb accumulate as a debt
    chalk up.
    • he chalked up $100 in the course of the evening
  • verb make by sewing together quickly
    • run up a skirt
WordNet

run-down

  • adjective satellite worn and broken down by hard use
    woebegone; creaky; decrepit; derelict; flea-bitten.
    • a creaky shack
    • a decrepit bus...its seats held together with friction tape
    • a flea-bitten sofa
    • a run-down neighborhood
    • a woebegone old shack
  • adjective satellite having the spring unwound
    • a run-down watch
WordNet

run-in

  • noun an angry dispute
    wrangle; dustup; words; quarrel; row.
    • they had a quarrel
    • they had words
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run-of-the-mill

  • adjective satellite not special in any way
    mine run; unexceptional; run-of-the-mill.
    • run-of-the-mill boxing
    • your run-of-the-mine college graduate
    • a unexceptional an incident as can be found in a lawyer's career
WordNet

run-of-the-mine

  • adjective satellite not special in any way
    mine run; unexceptional; run-of-the-mill.
    • run-of-the-mill boxing
    • your run-of-the-mine college graduate
    • a unexceptional an incident as can be found in a lawyer's career
WordNet

run-on

  • adjective (verse) without a rhetorical pause between lines
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run-on sentence

  • noun an ungrammatical sentence in which two or more independent clauses are conjoined without a conjunction
WordNet

run-resistant

  • adjective satellite (of hosiery) resistant to runs or (in Britain) ladders
    runproof; ladder-proof.
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run-through

  • noun an uninterrupted rehearsal
WordNet

run-time

  • noun the time at which a (software or multimedia) program is run
  • noun (computer science) the length of time it takes to execute a software program
WordNet

run-time error

  • noun an error in logic or arithmetic that must be detected at run time
    semantic error; runtime error.
WordNet

run-up

  • noun a substantial increase over a relatively short period of time
    runup.
    • a runup in interest rates
    • market runups are followed by corrections
  • noun the approach run during which an athlete gathers speed
WordNet

running away

  • noun the act of leaving (without permission) the place you are expected to be
WordNet

running back

  • noun (football) a back on the offensive team (a fullback or halfback) who tries to advance the ball by carrying it on plays from the line of scrimmage
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running blackberry

  • noun any of several trailing blackberry brambles especially of North America
    dewberry bush; dewberry.
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running board

  • noun a narrow footboard serving as a step beneath the doors of some old cars
WordNet

running game

  • noun (American football) a play in which a player attempts to carry the ball through or past the opposing team
    running; run; running game.
    • the defensive line braced to stop the run
    • the coach put great emphasis on running
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running hand

  • noun rapid handwriting in which letters are set down in full and are cursively connected within words without lifting the writing implement from the paper
    longhand; cursive; cursive script.
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running head

  • noun a heading printed at the top of every page (or every other page) of a book
    running head.
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running headline

  • noun a heading printed at the top of every page (or every other page) of a book
    running head.
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running light

  • noun light carried by a boat that indicates the boat's direction; vessels at night carry a red light on the port bow and a green light on the starboard bow
    sidelight.
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running mate

  • noun a nominee for the lesser of two closely related political offices
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running noose

  • noun a loop formed in a cord or rope by means of a slipknot; it binds tighter as the cord or rope is pulled
    noose; slip noose.
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running pine

  • noun a variety of club moss
    Lycopodium clavitum.
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running play

  • noun (American football) a play in which a player attempts to carry the ball through or past the opposing team
    running; run; running game.
    • the defensive line braced to stop the run
    • the coach put great emphasis on running
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running pop

  • noun tropical American passion flower with finely dissected bracts; stems malodorous when crushed
    Passiflora foetida; wild water lemon; love-in-a-mist.
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running postman

  • noun hairy trailing or prostrate western Australian vine with bright scarlet-pink flowers
    Kennedia prostrata; scarlet runner.
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running shoe

  • noun a light comfortable shoe designed for running
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running start

  • noun a racing start in which the contestants are already in full motion when they pass the starting line
    flying start.
  • noun a quick and auspicious beginning
    flying start.
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running stitch

  • noun small, even, hand stitches run in and out
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running suit

  • noun a matching jacket and pants worn by joggers and made of fabric that absorbs perspiration
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running time

  • noun the length of time that a movie or tv show runs
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running title

  • noun the title (or a shortened title) of a book used as a running head
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Sheep run

  • an extensive tract of country where sheep range and graze.
Webster 1913

short-run

  • adjective satellite relating to or extending over a limited period
    short-term.
    • short-run planning
    • a short-term lease
    • short-term credit
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ski run

  • noun trail or slope prepared for skiing
    ski trail.
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split run

  • noun a print run of a newspaper during which some articles or advertisements are changed to produce a different edition
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The run, ∨ The common run, etc.

  • ordinary persons; the generality or average of people or things; also, that which ordinarily occurs; ordinary current, course, or kind.
    I saw nothing else that is superior to the common run of parks. Walpole.
    Burns never dreamed of looking down on others as beneath him, merely because he was conscious of his own vast superiority to the common run of men. Prof. Wilson.
    His whole appearance was something out of the common run. W. Irving.
Webster 1913

tip-and-run

  • adjective satellite designed for or consisting of a brief attack followed by a quick escape
    hit-and-run.
    • hit-and-run units
    • tip-and-run assaults
WordNet

To fall, ∨ run, foul of

  • . See under Fall.
Webster 1913

To be, go, or run, on all fours

  • (Fig.), to be on the same footing; to correspond (with) exactly; to be alike in all the circumstances to be considered. "This example is on all fours with the other." "No simile can go on all fours." Macaulay.
Webster 1913

To cut and run

  • to make off suddenly and quickly; from the cutting of a ship's cable, when there is not time to raise the anchor. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To let go by the run

  • (Naut.), to loosen and let run freely, as lines; to let fall without restraint, as a sail.
Webster 1913

To let run

  • (Naut.), to allow to pass or move freely; to slacken or loosen.
Webster 1913

To move, run, ∨ go, against time

  • to move, run, or go a given distance without a competitor, in the quickest possible time; or, to accomplish the greatest distance which can be passed over in a given time; as, the horse is to run against time.
Webster 1913

To overhaul running rigging

  • to keep it clear, and see that no hitch occurs.
Webster 1913

To run a blockade

  • to get to, or away from, a blockaded port in safety.
Webster 1913

To run a foil

  • to lead astray; to puzzle; alluding to the habits of some animals of running back over the same track to mislead their pursuers.
Webster 1913

To run a muck

  • . See Amuck.
Webster 1913

To run a rig

  • to play a trick; to engage in a frolic; to do something strange and unbecoming.
Webster 1913

To run a risk

  • to incur hazard; to encounter danger.
Webster 1913

To run afoul of

  • to run against or come into collision with, especially so as to become entangled or to cause injury.
Webster 1913

To run after

  • to pursue or follow; to search for; to endeavor to find or obtain; as to run after similies. Locke.
Webster 1913

To run amuck

  • to rush out in a state of frenzy, as the Malays sometimes do under the influence of "bhang," and attack every one that comes in the way; to assail recklessly and indiscriminately.
Webster 1913

To run away

  • to flee; to escape; to elope; to run without control or guidance.
Webster 1913

To run away with

  • . (a) To convey away hurriedly; to accompany in escape or elopement. (b) To drag rapidly and with violence; as, a horse runs away with a carriage.
Webster 1913

To run down

  • . (a) To cease to work or operate on account of the exhaustion of the motive power; said of clocks, watches, etc. batteries (b) To decline in condition; as, to run down in health.
  • . (a) (Hunting) To chase till the object pursued is captured or exhausted; as, to run down, a stag . (b) (Naut.) To run against and sink, as a vessel . (c) To crush; to overthrow; to overbear .
    "religion is run down by the license of these times." Berkeley.
    (d) To disparage; to traduce. F. W. Newman.
Webster 1913

To run down a coast

  • to sail along it.
Webster 1913

To run for an office

  • to stand as a candidate for an office.
Webster 1913

To run hard

  • . (a) To press in competition; as, to run one hard in a race. (b) To urge or press importunately . (c) To banter severely.
Webster 1913

To run ininto

  • . (a) To enter; to step in . (b) To come in collision with.
Webster 1913

To run in trust

  • to run in debt; to get credit. Obs.
Webster 1913

To run in with

  • . (a) To close; to comply; to agree with. R. T. Baker. (b) (Naut.) To make toward; to near; to sail close to; as, to run in with the land.
Webster 1913

To run into the ground

  • to carry to an absurd extreme; to overdo. Slang, U.S. also, to operate a machine (as a car) without maintenance, until it malfunctions or becomes useless
Webster 1913

To run mad

  • . (a) To become wild with excitement . (b) To run wildly about under the influence of hydrophobia; to become affected with hydrophobia.
Webster 1913

To run mad, To run mad afteron

  • . See under Mad.
Webster 1913

To run mad after

  • to pursue under the influence of infatuation or immoderate desire. "The world is running mad after farce." Dryden.
Webster 1913

To run off

  • to cause to flow away, as a charge of molten metal from a furnace.
Webster 1913

To run on

  • . (a) To be continued; as, their accounts had run on for a year or two without a settlement. (b) To talk incessantly . (c) To continue a course . (d) To press with jokes or ridicule; to abuse with sarcasm; to bear hard on . (e) (Print.) To be continued in the same lines, without making a break or beginning a new paragraph .
  • (Print. ), to carry on or continue, as the type for a new sentence, without making a break or commencing a new paragraph.
Webster 1913

To run out

  • . (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread . "Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs." Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out.
    And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. Dryden.
  • . (a) To thrust or push out; to extend. (b) To waste; to exhaust; as, to run out an estate . (c) (Baseball) To put out while running between two bases.
Webster 1913

To run over

  • (Mach.), to have rotation in such direction that the crank pin traverses the upper, or front, half of its path in the forward, or outward, stroke; said of a crank which drives, or is driven by, a reciprocating piece.
  • . (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily . (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child.
Webster 1913

To run riot

  • to act wantonly or without restraint.
  • to go to excess.
Webster 1913

To run the chances, ∨ one's chances

  • to encounter all the risks of a certain course.
Webster 1913

To run the gantlet

  • to suffer the punishment of the gantlet; hence, to go through the ordeal of severe criticism or controversy, or ill-treatment at many hands.
Webster 1913

To run the guard

  • /mcol>, to pass the watch or sentinel without leave.
Webster 1913

To run through

  • . (a) To go through hastily; as to run through a book. (b) To spend wastefully; as, to run through an estate.
  • to transfix; to pierce, as with a sword. "[He] was run through the body by the man who had asked his advice." Addison.
Webster 1913

To run to seed

  • to expend or exhaust vitality in producing seed, as a plant; figuratively and colloquially, to cease growing; to lose vital force, as the body or mind.
Webster 1913

To run up

  • to rise; to swell; to grow; to increase; as, accounts of goods credited run up very fast.
    But these, having been untrimmed for many years, had run up into great bushes, or rather dwarf trees. Sir W. Scott.
  • . (a) To thrust up, as anything long and slender. (b) To increase; to enlarge by additions, as an account . e.g. to incur a debt, as to run up a bill (c) To erect hastily, as a building .
Webster 1913

To run upon sorts

  • (Print.), to use or require a greater number of some particular letters, figures, or marks than the regular proportion, as, for example, in making an index.
Webster 1913

To run wild

  • to go unrestrained or untamed; to live or untamed; to live or grow without culture or training.
Webster 1913

To run with

  • . (a) To be drenched with, so that streams flow; as, the streets ran with blood. (b) To flow while charged with some foreign substance . "Its rivers ran with gold." J. H. Newman.
Webster 1913

trial run

  • noun trying something to find out about it
    test; trial; tryout.
    • a sample for ten days free trial
    • a trial of progesterone failed to relieve the pain
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unearned run

  • noun a run that was scored as a result of an error by the other team
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