logo
Free & Quick Proofreading from Grammarly!

pull Idioms & Phrases


Bell pull

  • a cord, handle, or knob, connecting with a bell or bell wire, and which will ring the bell when pulled. Aytoun.
Webster 1913

cost-pull inflation

  • noun inflation caused by an increase in the costs of production
WordNet

Dead pulled wool

  • wool pulled from a carcass.
Webster 1913

demand-pull inflation

  • noun inflation caused by an increase in demand or in the supply of money
WordNet

leg-pull

  • noun as a joke: trying to make somebody believe something that is not true
    leg-pull.
WordNet

leg-pulling

  • noun as a joke: trying to make somebody believe something that is not true
    leg-pull.
WordNet

nail pulling

  • noun a form of torture in which the fingernails or toenails are removed
    nail removal.
WordNet

pull a face

  • verb contort the face to indicate a certain mental or emotional state
    make a face; grimace.
    • He grimaced when he saw the amount of homework he had to do
WordNet

pull a fast one on

  • verb deceive somebody
    play tricks; flim-flam; play a joke on; fox; trick; play a trick on; fob.
    • We tricked the teacher into thinking that class would be cancelled next week
WordNet

pull ahead

  • verb obtain advantages, such as points, etc.
    make headway; advance; gain ground; get ahead; win; gain.
    • The home team was gaining ground
    • After defeating the Knicks, the Blazers pulled ahead of the Lakers in the battle for the number-one playoff berth in the Western Conference
WordNet

pull along

  • verb pull along heavily, like a heavy load against a resistance
    schlep; shlep.
    • Can you shlep this bag of potatoes upstairs?
    • She pulled along a large trunk
WordNet

pull at

  • verb pluck or pull at with the fingers
    pick at; pluck at.
    • She picked nervously at the buttons of her blouse
WordNet

pull away

  • verb pull back or move away or backward
    retire; recede; move back; withdraw; pull away; draw back; retreat.
    • The enemy withdrew
    • The limo pulled away from the curb
WordNet

pull back

  • verb pull back or move away or backward
    retire; recede; move back; withdraw; pull away; draw back; retreat.
    • The enemy withdrew
    • The limo pulled away from the curb
  • verb use a surgical instrument to hold open (the edges of a wound or an organ)
    retract; draw back.
  • verb move to a rearward position; pull towards the back
    • Pull back your arms!
  • verb stretch back a bowstring (on an archer's bow)
    draw.
    • The archers were drawing their bows
  • verb make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity
    back away; back out; crawfish; pull back; crawfish out; withdraw; retreat.
    • We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him
    • He backed out of his earlier promise
    • The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns
WordNet

pull chain

  • noun a chain (usually with a handle at the end) that is pulled in order to operate some mechanism (e.g. to flush a toilet)
WordNet

pull down

  • verb tear down so as to make flat with the ground
    rase; level; take down; dismantle; tear down; raze.
    • The building was levelled
  • verb cause to come or go down
    down; knock down; push down; cut down.
    • The policeman downed the heavily armed suspect
    • The mugger knocked down the old lady after she refused to hand over her wallet
WordNet

pull in

  • verb direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes
    pull; draw in; attract; draw.
    • Her good looks attract the stares of many men
    • The ad pulled in many potential customers
    • This pianist pulls huge crowds
    • The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers
  • verb earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages
    earn; bring in; clear; take in; gain; realise; realize; make.
    • How much do you make a month in your new job?
    • She earns a lot in her new job
    • this merger brought in lots of money
    • He clears $5,000 each month
  • verb of trains; move into (a station)
    get in; draw in; move in.
    • The bullet train drew into Tokyo Station
  • verb get or bring together
    collect.
    • accumulate evidence
WordNet

pull in one's horns

  • verb make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity
    back away; back out; crawfish; pull back; crawfish out; withdraw; retreat.
    • We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him
    • He backed out of his earlier promise
    • The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns
WordNet

pull off

  • verb pull or pull out sharply
    tweak; pick off; pluck.
    • pluck the flowers off the bush
  • verb cause to withdraw
    • We pulled this firm off the project because they overcharged
  • verb be successful; achieve a goal
    manage; negociate; bring off; carry off.
    • She succeeded in persuading us all
    • I managed to carry the box upstairs
    • She pulled it off, even though we never thought her capable of it
    • The pianist negociated the difficult runs
  • verb remove by drawing or pulling
    draw away; draw off.
    • She placed the tray down and drew off the cloth
    • draw away the cloth that is covering the cheese
WordNet

pull one's weight

  • verb do one's share in a common task
    • Bob has never pulled his weight, and we all have to work harder to make up for his laziness
WordNet

pull out

  • verb move out or away
    get out.
    • The troops pulled out after the cease-fire
  • verb bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover
    take out; pull; draw; get out.
    • draw a weapon
    • pull out a gun
    • The mugger pulled a knife on his victim
  • verb remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense
    take out; pull; pull out; draw out; extract.
    • pull weeds
    • extract a bad tooth
    • take out a splinter
    • extract information from the telegram
  • verb remove oneself from an obligation
    back down; back off; bow out; chicken out.
    • He bowed out when he heard how much work was involved
WordNet

pull out all the stops

  • verb use all resources available
    • The organizers pulled out all the stops for the centennial meeting
WordNet

pull over

  • verb steer a vehicle to the side of the road
    • The car pulled over when the ambulance approached at high speed
WordNet

pull rank

  • to insist on one's own prerogative or plan of action, by right of a higher rank than that of one suggesting a different plan
Webster 1913

pull round

  • verb continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    survive; pull round; make it; come through.
    • He survived the cancer against all odds
WordNet

pull someone's leg

  • verb subject to a playful hoax or joke
    hoax; play a joke on.
WordNet

pull strings

  • verb influence or control shrewdly or deviously
    pull strings; manipulate.
    • He manipulated public opinion in his favor
WordNet

pull the leg of

  • verb tell false information to for fun
    kid.
    • Are you pulling my leg?
WordNet

pull the plug

  • verb prevent from happening or continuing
    • The government pulled the plug on spending
WordNet

pull the wool over someone's eyes

  • verb conceal one's true motives from especially by elaborately feigning good intentions so as to gain an end
    lead by the nose; play false; snow; hoodwink; bamboozle.
    • He bamboozled his professors into thinking that he knew the subject well
WordNet

pull through

  • verb continue in existence after (an adversity, etc.)
    survive; pull round; make it; come through.
    • He survived the cancer against all odds
  • verb bring into safety
    bring through; save; carry through.
    • We pulled through most of the victims of the bomb attack
WordNet

pull together

  • verb assemble or get together
    collect; gather; garner.
    • gather some stones
    • pull your thoughts together
WordNet

pull up

  • verb come to a halt after driving somewhere
    draw up; haul up.
    • The Rolls pulled up on pour front lawn
    • The chauffeur hauled up in front of us
  • verb straighten oneself
    draw up; straighten up.
    • He drew himself up when he talked to his superior
  • verb cause (a vehicle) to stop
    draw up.
    • He pulled up the car in front of the hotel
  • verb remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense
    take out; pull; pull out; draw out; extract.
    • pull weeds
    • extract a bad tooth
    • take out a splinter
    • extract information from the telegram
WordNet

pull up short

  • verb stop abruptly
    • The police car pulled up short and then turned around fast
WordNet

pull up stakes

  • verb remove oneself from an association with or participation in
    leave; depart.
    • She wants to leave
    • The teenager left home
    • She left her position with the Red Cross
    • He left the Senate after two terms
    • after 20 years with the same company, she pulled up stakes
WordNet

pull wires

  • verb influence or control shrewdly or deviously
    pull strings; manipulate.
    • He manipulated public opinion in his favor
WordNet

pull-in

  • noun a roadside cafe especially for lorry drivers
    pull-in.
WordNet

pull-off

  • noun designated paved area beside a main road where cars can stop temporarily
    rest stop; lay-by; rest area; layby.
WordNet

pull-through

  • noun cleaning implement consisting of an oily rag attached by a cord to a weight; is pulled through the barrel of a rifle or handgun to clean it
WordNet

pull-up

  • noun a roadside cafe especially for lorry drivers
    pull-in.
  • noun an arm exercise performed by pulling yourself up on a horizontal bar until your chin is level with the bar
    chin-up.
WordNet

pulling out

  • noun a method of birth control in which coitus is initiated but the penis is deliberately withdrawn before ejaculation
    withdrawal method; coitus interruptus; onanism; withdrawal.
WordNet

To pull a finch

  • to swindle an ignorant or unsuspecting person. Obs. "Privily a finch eke could he pull."
Webster 1913

To pull and haul

  • to draw hither and thither. " Both are equally pulled and hauled to do that which they are unable to do. " South.
Webster 1913

To pull apart

  • to become separated by pulling; as, a rope will pull apart.
Webster 1913

To pull down

  • to demolish; to destroy; to degrade; as, to pull down a house. " In political affairs, as well as mechanical, it is easier to pull down than build up." Howell. " To raise the wretched, and pull down the proud." Roscommon.
Webster 1913

To pull off

  • take or draw off. (b) to perform (something illegal or unethical); as, to pull off a heist [robbery]. (c) to accomplish, against the odds.
Webster 1913

To pull through

  • to come successfully to the end of a difficult undertaking, a dangerous sickness, or the like.
Webster 1913

To pull up

  • to draw the reins; to stop; to halt.
Webster 1913

wire-pulling

Wire"-pull`ing noun
Definitions
  1. The act of pulling the wires, as of a puppet; hence, secret influence or management, especially in politics; intrigue.
Webster 1913