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point Idioms & Phrases


- Equinoctial points

  • (Astron.), the two points where the celestial and ecliptic intersect each other; the one being in the first point of Aries, the other in the first point of Libra.
Webster 1913

Accidental point

  • (Persp.), the point in which a right line, drawn from the eye, parallel to a given right line, cuts the perspective plane; so called to distinguish it from the principal point, or point of view, where a line drawn from the eye perpendicular to the perspective plane meets this plane.
Webster 1913

alveolar point

  • noun craniometric point that is the most anterior point in the midline on the alveolar process of the maxilla
    prostheon; prosthion.
WordNet

Angular point

  • the point at which the sides of the angle meet; the vertex.
Webster 1913

Armed at all points

  • (Blazoning), completely incased in armor, sometimes described as armed cap-à-pie. Cussans.
Webster 1913

At all points

  • in every particular, completely; perfectly. Shak.
Webster 1913

At point, In point, At, In, ∨ On, the point

  • as near as can be; on the verge; about (see About, prep., 6); as, at the point of death; he was on the point of speaking. "In point to fall down." Chaucer. "Caius Sidius Geta, at point to have been taken, recovered himself so valiantly as brought day on his side." Milton.
Webster 1913

auricular point

  • noun the craniometric point at the center of the opening of the external acoustic meatus
    auriculare.
WordNet

basic point defense missile system

  • noun a shipboard missile system
WordNet

blue point

  • noun oysters originally from Long Island Sound but now from anywhere along the northeastern seacoast; usually eaten raw
    bluepoint.
  • noun small edible oyster typically from the southern shore of Long Island
    bluepoint.
WordNet

blue point siamese

  • noun Siamese cat having a bluish cream-colored body and dark grey points
WordNet

blue pointed

  • noun common blue-grey shark of southwest Pacific; sport and food fish
    bonito shark; Isurus glaucus.
WordNet

Boiling point

  • noun the temperature at which a liquid boils at sea level
    boil.
    • they brought the water to a boil
  • noun being highly angry or excited; ready to boil over
    • after an hour of waiting I was at the boiling point
WordNet
  • the temperature at which a fluid is converted into vapor, with the phenomena of ebullition. This is different for different liquids, and for the same liquid under different pressures. For water, at the level of the sea, barometer 30 in., it is 212 ° Fahrenheit; for alcohol, 172.96°; for ether, 94.8°; for mercury, about 675°. The boiling point of water is lowered one degree Fahrenheit for about 550 feet of ascent above the level of the sea.
Webster 1913

breaker point

  • noun a contact in the distributor; as the rotor turns its projecting arm contacts them and current flows to the spark plugs
    breaker point; point.
WordNet

breaking point

  • noun (psychology) stress at which a person breaks down or a situation becomes crucial
  • noun the degree of tension or stress at which something breaks
WordNet

bristle-pointed

  • adjective satellite pointed like bristles
WordNet
Bris"tle-point`ed adjective
Definitions
  1. (Bot.) Terminating in a very fine, sharp point, as some leaves.
Webster 1913

Brussels point

  • . See Point lace.
Webster 1913

Carbon point

  • (Elec.), a small cylinder or bit of gas carbon moved forward by clockwork so that, as it is burned away by the electric current, it shall contantly maintain its proper relation to the opposing point.
Webster 1913

cardinal compass point

  • noun one of the four main compass points
WordNet

Cardinal points

  • (a) (Geol.) The four principal points of the compass, or intersections of the horizon with the meridian and the prime vertical circle, north, south east, and west. (b) (Astrol.) The rising and setting of the sun, the zenith and nadir.
Webster 1913

case in point

  • noun an example that is used to justify similar occurrences at a later time
    precedent.
WordNet

celestial point

  • noun a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)
WordNet

Charcoal point

  • a carbon pencil prepared for use un an electric light apparatus.
Webster 1913

Circular points at infinity

  • (Geom.), two imaginary points at infinite distance through which every circle in the plane is, in the theory of curves, imagined to pass.
Webster 1913

compass point

  • noun any of 32 horizontal directions indicated on the card of a compass
    point.
    • he checked the point on his compass
WordNet

Conjugate point

  • (Geom.), an acnode. See Acnode, and Double point.
Webster 1913

Consequent points, Consequent poles

  • (Magnetism), a number of poles distributed under certain conditions, along the axis of a magnetized steel bar, which regularly has but the two poles at the extremities.
Webster 1913

cover-point

Cov"er-point` noun
Definitions
  1. The fielder in the games of cricket and lacrosse who supports "point."
Webster 1913

craniometric point

  • noun a landmark on the skull from which craniometric measurements can be taken
WordNet

Critical point

  • noun a crisis situation or point in time when a critical decision must be made
    juncture; crossroads.
    • at that juncture he had no idea what to do
    • he must be made to realize that the company stands at a critical point
WordNet
  • (Physics), a certain temperature, different for different gases, but always the same for each gas, regarded as the limit above which no amount of pressure can produce condensation to a liquid.
Webster 1913

curie point

  • noun the temperature above which a ferromagnetic substance loses its ferromagnetism and becomes paramagnetic
    Curie temperature.
WordNet

data point

  • noun an item of factual information derived from measurement or research
    datum.
WordNet

Dead center, ∨ Dead point

  • (Mach.), either of two points in the orbit of a crank, at which the crank and connecting rod lie a straight line. It corresponds to the end of a stroke; as, A and B are dead centers of the crank mechanism in which the crank C drives, or is driven by, the lever L.
Webster 1913

Dead point

  • . (Mach.) See Dead center.
  • . (Mach.) Same as Dead center, under Dead.
Webster 1913

Decimal point

  • noun the dot at the left of a decimal fraction
    point; decimal point.
WordNet
  • a dot or full stop at the left of a decimal fraction. The figures at the left of the point represent units or whole numbers, as 1.05.
Webster 1913

dew point

  • noun the temperature at which the water vapor in the air becomes saturated and condensation begins
WordNet

dew-point

Dew"-point` noun
Definitions
  1. (Meteor.) The temperature at which dew begins to form. It varies with the humidity and temperature of the atmosphere.
Webster 1913

Dexter chief, ∨ Dexter point

  • (Her.), a point in the dexter upper corner of the shield, being in the dexter extremity of the chief, as A in the cut.
Webster 1913

diamond point

  • noun a very hard small point made from a diamond
WordNet

Diamond-point tool

  • a cutting tool whose point is diamond-shaped.
Webster 1913

distributor point

  • noun a contact in the distributor; as the rotor turns its projecting arm contacts them and current flows to the spark plugs
    breaker point; point.
WordNet

Double point

  • (Geom.), a point of a curve at which two branches cross each other. Conjugate or isolated points of a curve are called double points, since they possess most of the properties of double points (see Conjugate). They are also called acnodes, and those points where the branches of the curve really cross are called crunodes. The extremity of a cusp is also a double point.
Webster 1913

Dry point

  • noun a print produced by dry point engraving
  • noun a steel needle for engraving without acid on a bare copper plate
WordNet
  • . (Fine Arts) (a) An engraving made with the needle instead of the burin, in which the work is done nearly as in etching, but is finished without the use acid . (b) A print from such an engraving, usually upon paper. (c) Hence: The needle with which such an engraving is made.
Webster 1913

dust-point

Dust"-point` noun
Definitions
  1. An old rural game.
    With any boy at dust-point they shall play. Peacham (1620).
Webster 1913

end point

  • noun a place where something ends or is complete
    endpoint; terminus; termination.
  • noun the final point in a process
    resultant.
WordNet

equinoctial point

  • noun (astronomy) either of the two celestial points at which the celestial equator intersects the ecliptic
    equinox.
WordNet

Estoile of eight points

  • a star which has four straight and four wavy rays.
Webster 1913

Estoile of four points

  • . Same as Cross estoilé, under Cross.
Webster 1913

exclamation point

  • noun a punctuation mark (!) used after an exclamation
    exclamation mark.
WordNet

extra point

  • noun in American football a point awarded for a successful place kick following a touchdown
    point after; extra point.
WordNet

extreme point

  • noun the point located farthest from the middle of something
    extremum; extreme.
WordNet

Far point

  • (Med.), in ophthalmology, the farthest point at which objects are seen distinctly. In normal eyes the nearest point at which objects are seen distinctly; either with the two eyes together (binocular near point), or with each eye separately (monocular near point).
Webster 1913

Fess point

  • (Her.), the exact center of the escutcheon. See Escutcheon.
Webster 1913

Fiducial line ∨ point

  • (Math. & Physics.), a line or point of reference, as for setting a graduated circle or scale used for measurments.
Webster 1913

finger-pointing

  • noun the imputation of blame
    fingerpointing.
    • they want all the finger-pointing about intelligence failures to stop
WordNet

five-point bishop's cap

  • noun small plant with leaves in a basal cluster and tiny greenish flowers in slender racemes; northwestern North America to California and Colorado
    Mitella pentandra.
WordNet

five-pointed

  • adjective satellite having five points
WordNet

fixed-point notation

  • noun a radix numeration system in which the location of the decimal point is fixed by convention
    fixed-point notation.
WordNet

fixed-point number

  • noun a number represented in fixed-point notation
WordNet

fixed-point part

  • noun the positive fractional part of the representation of a logarithm; in the expression log 643 = 2.808 the mantissa is .808
    mantissa.
WordNet

fixed-point representation system

  • noun a radix numeration system in which the location of the decimal point is fixed by convention
    fixed-point notation.
WordNet

flash point

  • noun point at which something is ready to blow up
    flashpoint.
  • noun the lowest temperature at which the vapor of a combustible liquid can be ignited in air
    flashpoint.
WordNet

Flashing point

  • (Chem.), that degree of temperature at which a volatile oil gives off vapor in sufficient quantity to burn, or flash, on the approach of a flame, used as a test of the comparative safety of oils, esp. kerosene; a flashing point of 100° F. is regarded as a fairly safe standard. The burning point of the oil is usually from ten to thirty degree above the flashing point of its vapor.
Webster 1913

floating-point notation

  • noun a radix numeration system in which the location of the decimal point is indicated by an exponent of the radix; in the floating-point representation system, 0.0012 is represented as 0.12-2 where -2 is the exponent
    floating-point notation.
WordNet

floating-point number

  • noun a number represented in floating-point notation
WordNet

floating-point operation

  • noun an arithmetic operation performed on floating-point numbers
    flop.
    • this computer can perform a million flops per second
WordNet

floating-point representation system

  • noun a radix numeration system in which the location of the decimal point is indicated by an exponent of the radix; in the floating-point representation system, 0.0012 is represented as 0.12-2 where -2 is the exponent
    floating-point notation.
WordNet

focal point

  • noun a point of convergence of light (or other radiation) or a point from which it diverges
    focus.
  • noun a central point or locus of an infection in an organism
    nidus; focus.
    • the focus of infection
  • noun the concentration of attention or energy on something
    direction; centering; focussing; focus; focusing.
    • the focus of activity shifted to molecular biology
    • he had no direction in his life
WordNet

fourfold point correlation

  • noun an index of the relation between any two sets of scores that can both be represented on ordered binary dimensions (e.g., male-female)
    phi coefficient; phi correlation.
WordNet

Freezing point

  • noun the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solid
    freezing point.
WordNet
  • that degree of a thermometer at which a fluid begins to freeze; applied particularly to water, whose freezing point is at 32° Fahr., and at 0° Centigrade.
Webster 1913

full point

  • noun a punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations
    full stop; stop; period; point.
    • in England they call a period a stop
WordNet

Fusing point

  • the degree of temperature at which a substance melts; the point of fusion.
Webster 1913

Gauge point

  • the diameter of a cylinder whose altitude is one inch, and contents equal to that of a unit of a given measure; a term used in gauging casks, etc.
Webster 1913

geographic point

  • noun a point on the surface of the Earth
    geographic point.
WordNet

geographical point

  • noun a point on the surface of the Earth
    geographic point.
WordNet

grade point

  • noun a numerical value assigned to a letter grade received in a course taken at a college or university multiplied by the number of credit hours awarded for the course
WordNet

grade point average

  • noun a measure of a student's academic achievement at a college or university; calculated by dividing the total number of grade points received by the total number attempted
    GPA.
WordNet

gros point

  • noun a needlepoint stitch covering two horizontal and two vertical threads
  • noun needlepoint embroidery done with large stitches
WordNet

Heart point

  • (Her.), the fess point. See Escutcheon.
Webster 1913

high point

  • noun the most enjoyable part of a given experience
    • the trumpet solo was the high point of the concert
WordNet

Honor point

  • . (Her.) See Escutcheon.
Webster 1913

Imaginary points, lines, surfaces

  • etc. (Geom.), points, lines, surfaces, etc., imagined to exist, although by reason of certain changes of a figure they have in fact ceased to have a real existence.
Webster 1913

in point of fact

  • adverb in reality or actuality
    as a matter of fact; in fact.
    • in fact, it was a wonder anyone survived
    • painters who are in fact anything but unsophisticated
    • as a matter of fact, he is several inches taller than his father
WordNet

interrogation point

  • noun a punctuation mark (?) placed at the end of a sentence to indicate a question
    question mark.
WordNet

intersection point

  • noun a point where lines intersect
    intersection point; intersection.
WordNet

Inverse points

  • (Geom.), two points lying on a line drawn from the center of a fixed circle or sphere, and so related that the product of their distances from the center of the circle or sphere is equal to the square of the radius.
Webster 1913

Isolated point of a curve

  • . (Geom.) See Acnode.
Webster 1913

jugal point

  • noun the craniometric point at the union of the frontal and temporal processes of the zygomatic bone
    jugale.
WordNet

jumping-off point

  • noun a beginning from which an enterprise is launched
    springboard; jumping-off point.
    • he uses other people's ideas as a springboard for his own
    • reality provides the jumping-off point for his illusions
    • the point of departure of international comparison cannot be an institution but must be the function it carries out
WordNet

limit point

  • noun the mathematical value toward which a function goes as the independent variable approaches infinity
    limit; limit point.
WordNet

Lubber's line, point, ∨ mark

  • a line or point in the compass case indicating the head of the ship, and consequently the course which the ship is steering.
Webster 1913

lubber's point

  • noun a fixed line on a ship's compass indicating its heading
    lubber's line; lubber's mark; lubber line.
WordNet

make a point

  • verb make a point of doing something; act purposefully and intentionally
    make sure.
WordNet

Masoretic points and accents

  • the vowel points and accents of the Hebrew text of the Bible, of which the first mention is in the Masora.
Webster 1913

match point

  • noun (tennis) the final point needed to win a match (especially in tennis)
WordNet

mcburney's point

  • noun a point one third of the way along a line drawn from the hip to the umbilicus; the point of maximum sensitivity in acute appendicitis
WordNet

Median point

  • (Geom.), the point where the three median lines of a triangle mutually intersect.
Webster 1913

Melting point

  • noun the temperature below which a liquid turns into a solid
    freezing point.
WordNet
  • (Chem.), the degree of temperature at which a solid substance melts or fuses; as, the melting point of ice is 0° Centigrade or 32° Fahr., that of urea is 132° Centigrade.
Webster 1913

million floating point operations per second

  • noun (computer science) a unit for measuring the speed of a computer system
    megaflop; MFLOP.
WordNet

Moot point

  • a point or question to be debated; a doubtful question.
Webster 1913

  • noun the center point or middle of something
    navel.
    • the Incas believed that Cuzco was the navel of the universe
WordNet
  • . (Her.) Same as Nombril.
Webster 1913

needle-pointed

Nee"dle-pointed` adjective
Definitions
  1. Pointed as needles.
Webster 1913

Nine points circle

  • (Geom.), a circle so related to any given triangle as to pass through the three points in which the perpendiculars from the angles of the triangle upon the opposite sides (or the sides produced) meet the sides. It also passes through the three middle points of the sides of the triangle and through the three middle points of those parts of the perpendiculars that are between their common point of meeting and the angles of the triangle. The circle is hence called the nine points ∨ six points circle.
Webster 1913

Nine points of the law

  • all but the tenth point; the greater weight of authority.
Webster 1913

Nodal line, Nodal point

  • in a vibrating plate or cord, that line or point which remains at rest while the other parts of the body are in a state of vibration.
Webster 1913

Objective point

  • the point or result to which the operations of an army are directed. By extension, the point or purpose to which anything, as a journey or an argument, is directed.
Webster 1913

Occipital point

  • (Anat.), the point of the occiput in the mesial plane farthest from the ophryon.
Webster 1913

on that point

  • adverb in that matter
    there; in that respect.
    • I agree with you there
WordNet

On the point

  • . See At point, above.
Webster 1913

orbital point

  • noun the craniometric point at the lowest point on the lower edge of the orbit
    orbitale.
WordNet

Organ point

  • (Mus.), a passage in which the tonic or dominant is sustained continuously by one part, while the other parts move.
Webster 1913

pedal point

  • noun a sustained bass note
    pedal.
WordNet

percentage point

  • noun the dot at the left of a decimal fraction
    point; decimal point.
WordNet

petit point

  • noun a small diagonal needlepoint stitch
    tent stitch.
  • noun needlepoint done with small stitches
WordNet

Physical point

  • an indefinitely small portion of matter; a point conceived as being without extension, yet having physical properties, as weight, inertia, momentum, etc.; a material point.
Webster 1913

Pitch point

  • (Gearing), the point of contact of the pitch lines of two gears, or of a rack and pinion, which work together.
Webster 1913

point after

  • noun in American football a point awarded for a successful place kick following a touchdown
    point after; extra point.
WordNet

point after touchdown

  • noun in American football a point awarded for a successful place kick following a touchdown
    point after; extra point.
WordNet

point d'appui

Point` d'ap`pui"
Etymology
F.
Definitions
  1. (Mil.) See under Appui.
Webster 1913

point duty

  • noun the control of traffic by a policeman stationed at an intersection
WordNet

point in time

  • noun an instant of time
    point.
    • at that point I had to leave
WordNet

point jam

  • verb jam a narrow band of frequencies
    • We can counter point-jamming effectively
WordNet

Point lace

  • noun lace worked with a needle in a buttonhole stitch on a paper pattern
    needlepoint.
WordNet
  • lace wrought with the needle, as distinguished from that made on the pillow.
Webster 1913

point man

  • noun someone who is the forefront of an important enterprise
    • he is the president's point man on economic issues
  • noun a soldier who goes ahead of a patrol
WordNet

point mutation

  • noun (genetics) a mutation due to an intramolecular reorganization of a gene
    gene mutation.
WordNet

Point net

  • a machine-made lace imitating a kind of Brussels lace (Brussels ground).
Webster 1913

point of accumulation

  • noun the mathematical value toward which a function goes as the independent variable approaches infinity
    limit; limit point.
WordNet

point of apoapsis

  • noun (astronomy) the point in an orbit farthest from the body being orbited
    apoapsis.
WordNet

Point of concurrence

  • (Geom.), a point common to two lines, but not a point of tangency or of intersection, as, for instance, that in which a cycloid meets its base.
Webster 1913

Point of contrary flexure

  • a point at which a curve changes its direction of curvature, or at which its convexity and concavity change sides.
Webster 1913

point of departure

  • noun a place from which an enterprise or expedition is launched
    jumping-off place.
    • one day when I was at a suitable jumping-off place I decided to see if I could find him
    • my point of departure was San Francisco
  • noun a beginning from which an enterprise is launched
    springboard; jumping-off point.
    • he uses other people's ideas as a springboard for his own
    • reality provides the jumping-off point for his illusions
    • the point of departure of international comparison cannot be an institution but must be the function it carries out
WordNet

point of entry

  • noun a port in the United States where customs officials are stationed to oversee the entry and exit of people and merchandise
    port of entry.
WordNet

point of honor

  • noun a concern that seriously reflects on your honor
WordNet

point of intersection

  • noun a point where lines intersect
    intersection point; intersection.
WordNet

point of no return

  • noun a line that when crossed permits of no return and typically results in irrevocable commitment
    Rubicon.
WordNet

Point of order

  • noun a question as to whether the current proceedings are allowed by parliamentary procedure
WordNet
  • in parliamentary practice, a question of order or propriety under the rules.
Webster 1913

point of periapsis

  • noun (astronomy) the point in an orbit closest to the body being orbited
    periapsis.
WordNet

point of reference

  • noun an indicator that orients you generally
    point of reference; reference.
    • it is used as a reference for comparing the heating and the electrical energy involved
WordNet

Point of sight

  • (Persp.), in a perspective drawing, the point assumed as that occupied by the eye of the spectator.
Webster 1913

Point of view

  • noun a mental position from which things are viewed
    standpoint; stand; viewpoint.
    • we should consider this problem from the viewpoint of the Russians
    • teaching history gave him a special point of view toward current events
  • noun the spatial property of the position from which something is observed
WordNet
  • the relative position from which anything is seen or any subject is considered.
Webster 1913

point out

  • verb make or write a comment on
    comment; notice; remark.
    • he commented the paper of his colleague
  • verb point out carefully and clearly
    signalise; signalize; call attention.
  • verb present and urge reasons in opposition
    remonstrate.
WordNet

Point paper

  • paper pricked through so as to form a stencil for transferring a design.
Webster 1913

point source

  • noun a concentrated source (especially of radiation or pollution) that is spatially constricted
WordNet

point system

  • noun a system of evaluation based on awarding points according to rules
  • noun a system of graduating sizes of type in multiples of the point
  • noun a system of writing or printing using patterns of raised dots that can be read by touch
WordNet

Point system of type

  • . See under Type.
Webster 1913

point the way

  • verb indicate the right path or direction
    • The sign pointed the way to London
WordNet

point up

  • verb emphasize, especially by identification
    • This novel points up the racial problems in England
WordNet

point woman

  • noun a woman who is the forefront of an important enterprise
WordNet

point-and-shoot camera

  • noun a lightweight photographic camera with an autofocus
WordNet

point-blank

  • adjective satellite characterized by directness in manner or speech; without subtlety or evasion
    frank; straight-from-the-shoulder; outspoken; candid; plainspoken; blunt; free-spoken; forthright.
    • blunt talking and straight shooting
    • a blunt New England farmer
    • I gave them my candid opinion
    • forthright criticism
    • a forthright approach to the problem
    • tell me what you think--and you may just as well be frank
    • it is possible to be outspoken without being rude
    • plainspoken and to the point
    • a point-blank accusation
  • adjective satellite close enough to go straight to the target
    • point-blank range
    • a point-blank shot
  • adverb in a direct and unequivocal manner
    • I asked him point-blank whether he wanted the job
WordNet
Point`-blank" noun
Etymology
F. point point + blanc white.
Definitions
  1. The white spot on a target, at which an arrow or other missile is aimed. Obs. Jonson.
  2. (Mil.) (a) With all small arms, the second point in which the natural line of sight, when horizontal, cuts the trajectory. (b) With artillery, the point where the projectile first strikes the horizontal plane on which the gun stands, the axis of the piece being horizontal.
Point`-blank" adjective
Definitions
  1. Directed in a line toward the object aimed at; aimed directly toward the mark.
  2. Hence, direct; plain; unqualified; -- said of language; as, a point-blank assertion.
Point`-blank" adverb
Definitions
  1. In a point-blank manner.
    To sin point-blank against God's word. Fuller.
Webster 1913

point-device

Point`-de*vice", Point`-de*vise" adjective (Also<
  • Point-device
  • Point-devise
)
Etymology
OE. at point devis; at at + point point, condition + devis exact, careful, OF. devis fixed, set. See Device.
Definitions
  1. Uncommonly nice and exact; precise; particular.
    You are rather point-devise in your accouterments. Shak.
    Thus he grew up, in logic point-devise, Perfect in grammar, and in rhetoric nice. Longfellow.
Point`-de*vice", Point`-de*vise" adverb (Also<
  • Point-device
  • Point-devise
)
Definitions
  1. Exactly. Obs. Shak.
Webster 1913

point-of-sale

  • adjective of or relating to or being the location where something is purchased
WordNet

pointed arch

  • noun an arch with a pointed apex; characteristic of Gothic architecture
WordNet

pointed-leaf maple

  • noun small shrubby Japanese plant with leaves having 5 to 7 acuminate lobes; yellow in autumn
    Acer argutum.
WordNet

pointed-toe

  • adjective satellite having a pointed toe
    pointy-toed.
    • pointy-toed shoes
WordNet

pointing out

  • noun indication by demonstration
WordNet

pointing trowel

  • noun a trowel used to fill and finish masonry joints with mortar or cement
WordNet

Points of the compass

  • (Naut.), the thirty-two points of division of the compass card in the mariner's compass; the corresponding points by which the circle of the horizon is supposed to be divided, of which the four marking the directions of east, west, north, and south, are called cardinal points, and the rest are named from their respective directions, as N. by E., N. N. E., N. E. by N., N. E., etc. See Illust. under Compass.
Webster 1913

Power of a point

  • (relative to a given curve) (Geom.), the result of substituting the coördinates of any point in that expression which being put equal to zero forms the equation of the curve; as, x2 + y2 - 100 is the power of the point x, y, relative to the circle x2 + y2 - 100 = 0.
Webster 1913

power point

  • noun a wall socket
    point.
WordNet

pressure point

  • noun any of several points on the body where the pulse can be felt and where pressure on an underlying artery will control bleeding from that artery at a more distal point
  • noun where problems or difficulties are likely to occur
    • a key pressure point in the controversy was the building permit
  • noun an area on the skin that is highly sensitive to pressure
    • you must know the pressure points in order to administer shiatsu
WordNet

Principal point

  • (Persp.), the projection of the point of sight upon the plane of projection.
Webster 1913

Probe, ∨ Probe-pointed, scissors

  • (Surg.), scissors used to open wounds, the blade of which, to be thrust into the orifice, has a button at the end.
Webster 1913

probe-pointed

Probe"-point`ed adjective
Definitions
  1. (Surg.) Having a blunt or button-shaped extremity; -- said of cutting instruments.
Webster 1913

Projection of a point on a plane

  • (Descriptive Geom.), the foot of a perpendicular to the plane drawn through the point.
Webster 1913

Quarter point

  • . (Naut.) See Quarter, n., 1 (n).
Webster 1913

Radiant point

  • . (Astron.) See Radiant, n., 3.
Webster 1913

rallying point

  • noun a point or principle on which scattered or opposing groups can come together
WordNet

Ray point

  • (Geom.), the common point of a pencil of rays.
Webster 1913

reference point

  • noun an indicator that orients you generally
    point of reference; reference.
    • it is used as a reference for comparing the heating and the electrical energy involved
WordNet

Regression point

  • (Geom.), a cusp.
Webster 1913

Row of points

  • (Geom.), the points on a line, infinite in number, as the points in which a pencil of rays is intersected by a line.
Webster 1913

saturation point

  • noun (chemistry) the stage at which a substance will receive no more of another substance in solution or in a vapor
WordNet

selling point

  • noun a characteristic of something that is up for sale that makes it attractive to potential customers
WordNet

set point

  • noun (tennis) the final point needed to win a set in tennis
WordNet

sharp-pointed

  • adjective having a sharp point
WordNet

Singular point

  • (Geom.), a point of a curve which possesses some property not possessed by points in general on the curve, as a cusp, a point of inflection, a node, etc.
Webster 1913

Singular point in a curve

  • (Math.), a point at which the curve possesses some peculiar properties not possessed by other points of the curve, as a cusp point, or a multiple point.
Webster 1913

Six points circle

  • . (Geom.) See Nine points circle, under Nine.
Webster 1913

six-pointed

  • adjective satellite having six points
WordNet

spear-point

  • noun the head and sharpened point of a spear
    spearhead; spearpoint.
WordNet

Starting point

  • noun earliest limiting point
    terminus a quo.
WordNet
  • the point from which motion begins, or from which anything starts.
Webster 1913

Sticking point

  • noun a point at which an impasse arises in progress toward an agreement or a goal
WordNet
  • . Same as Sticking place, above.
Webster 1913

stopping point

  • noun the temporal end; the concluding time
    finish; last; finis; finale; close; conclusion.
    • the stopping point of each round was signaled by a bell
    • the market was up at the finish
    • they were playing better at the close of the season
WordNet

Strategic point

  • (Mil.), any point or region in the theater or warlike operations which affords to its possessor an advantage over his opponent, as a mountain pass, a junction of rivers or roads, a fortress, etc.
Webster 1913

strong point

  • noun an asset of special worth or utility
    strong suit; strength; speciality; specialty; long suit; forte; metier.
    • cooking is his forte
WordNet

Supraorbital point

  • (Anat.), the middle point of the supraorbital line, which is a line drawn across the narrowest part of the forehead, separating the face from the cranium; the ophryon.
Webster 1913

suspension point

  • noun (usually plural) one of a series of points indicating that something has been omitted or that the sentence is incomplete
WordNet

talking point

  • noun an especially persuasive point helping to support an argument or discussion
WordNet

terminal point

  • noun final or latest limiting point
    terminus ad quem; limit.
WordNet

three-point landing

  • noun a landing in which all three wheels of the aircraft touch the ground at the same time
WordNet

three-point switch

  • noun an electric switch that has three terminals; used to control a circuit from two different locations
    three-way switch.
WordNet

three-point turn

  • noun the act of turning a vehicle around in a limited space by moving in a series of back and forward arcs
WordNet

three-pointed

Three"-point`ed adjective
Definitions
  1. (Bot.) Having three acute or setigerous points; tricuspidate.
Webster 1913

To be at the boiling point

  • to be very angry.
Webster 1913

To carry one's point

  • to accomplish one's object, as in a controversy.
Webster 1913

To give points

  • . (a) In games of skill, to equalize chances by conceding a certain advantage; to allow a handicap. (b) To give useful suggestions. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To make, ∨ gain, a point

  • accomplish that which was proposed; also, to make advance by a step, grade, or position.
Webster 1913

To make a point of

  • to attach special importance to.
Webster 1913

To mark, ∨ score, a point

  • as in billiards, cricket, etc., to note down, or to make, a successful hit, run, etc.
Webster 1913

To point a rope

  • (Naut.), to taper and neatly finish off the end by interweaving the nettles.
Webster 1913

To point a sail

  • (Naut.), to affix points through the eyelet holes of the reefs.
Webster 1913

To point at

  • to treat with scorn or contempt by pointing or directing attention to.
Webster 1913

To point off

  • to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures.
Webster 1913

To point the yards

  • (of a vessel) (Naut.), to brace them so that the wind shall strike the sails obliquely. Totten.
Webster 1913

To point well

  • (Naut.), to sail close to the wind; said of a vessel.
Webster 1913

To strain a point

  • to make a special effort; especially, to do a degree of violence to some principle or to one's own feelings.
  • to go beyond the proper limit or rule; to stretch one's authority or conscience.
Webster 1913

To turn the edgepoint of

  • to bend over the edge or point of so as to make dull; to blunt.
Webster 1913

To weather a point

  • . (a) (Naut.) To pass a point of land, leaving it on the lee side. (b) Hence, to gain or accomplish anything against opposition.
Webster 1913

topographic point

  • noun a point located with respect to surface features of some region
    spot; place.
    • this is a nice place for a picnic
    • a bright spot on a planet
WordNet

trillion floating point operations per second

  • noun (computer science) a unit for measuring the speed of a computer system
    teraflop.
WordNet

Turning point

  • noun an event marking a unique or important historical change of course or one on which important developments depend
    landmark; watershed.
    • the agreement was a watershed in the history of both nations
  • noun the intersection of two streets
    corner; street corner.
    • standing on the corner watching all the girls go by
WordNet
  • the point upon which a question turns, and which decides a case.
Webster 1913

Umbilical point

  • (Geom.), an umbilicus. See Umbilicus, 5.
Webster 1913

Vanishing point

  • noun the point beyond which something disappears or ceases to exist
  • noun the appearance of a point on the horizon at which parallel lines converge
WordNet
  • (Persp.), the point to which all parallel lines in the same plane tend in the representation. Gwilt.
Webster 1913

vantage point

  • noun a place from which something can be viewed
    viewpoint.
    • from that vantage point he could survey the whole valley
WordNet

Visual point

  • the point at which the visual rays unite; the position of the eye.
Webster 1913

Vowel point

  • noun a mark placed below or near a consonant (as in Hebrew or Arabic) to indicate the spoken vowel
WordNet
  • in Hebrew, and certain other Eastern and ancient languages, a mark placed above or below the consonant, or attached to it, representing the vowel, or vocal sound, which precedes or follows the consonant.
Webster 1913

weak point

  • noun an attribute that is inadequate or deficient
WordNet

well point

  • noun a perforated tube driven into the ground to collect water from the surrounding area
    wellpoint.
WordNet

west point

  • noun United States Army installation on the west bank of Hudson river to the north of New York City; site of United States Military Academy
WordNet

wire-haired pointing griffon

  • noun breed of medium-sized long-headed dogs with downy undercoat and harsh wiry outer coat; originated in Holland but largely developed in France
    griffon.
WordNet

Working point

  • (Mach.), that part of a machine at which the effect required; the point where the useful work is done.
Webster 1913

Zero point

  • noun the point on a scale from which positive or negative numerical quantities can be measured
    zero.
WordNet
  • the point indicating zero, or the commencement of a scale or reckoning.
Webster 1913

~= point

  • the point of the equator intersected by the ecliptic, as the sun proceeds southward; the first point of Libra.
Webster 1913

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

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