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All over

  • adjective satellite having come or been brought to a conclusion
    concluded; terminated; complete; over; ended.
    • the harvesting was complete
    • the affair is over, ended, finished
    • the abruptly terminated interview
  • adverb over the entire area
    over.
    • the wallpaper was covered all over with flowers
    • she ached all over
    • everything was dusted over with a fine layer of soot
  • adverb to or in any or all places; (`everyplace' is used informally for `everywhere')
    everyplace; everywhere.
    • You find fast food stores everywhere
    • people everywhere are becoming aware of the problem
    • he carried a gun everywhere he went
    • looked all over for a suitable gift
WordNet
  • . (a) Over the whole; upon all parts; completely; as, he is spatterd with mud all over. (b) Wholly over; at an end; as, it is all over with him.
  • over the whole extent; thoroughly; wholly; as, she is her mother all over. Colloq.
Webster 1913

arch over

  • verb form an arch over
    overarch.
    • Big rocks overarch the stream
WordNet

ask over

  • verb invite someone to one's house
    invite; ask round.
    • Can I invite you for dinner on Sunday night?
WordNet

ball over

  • verb surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off
    take aback; shock; blow out of the water; floor.
    • I was floored when I heard that I was promoted
WordNet

bend over backwards

  • verb try very hard to please someone
    bend over backwards.
    • She falls over backwards when she sees her mother-in-law
WordNet

bind over

  • verb order a defendant to be placed in custody pending the outcome of a proceedings against him or her
    • The defendant was bound over for trial
WordNet

blow over

  • verb disappear gradually
    fade; pass; evanesce; fleet; pass off.
    • The pain eventually passed off
WordNet

boil over

  • verb overflow or cause to overflow while boiling
    overboil.
    • The milk is boiling over
WordNet

bowl over

  • verb cause to overturn from an upright or normal position
    tip over; tump over; upset; knock over; overturn; bowl over.
    • The cat knocked over the flower vase
    • the clumsy customer turned over the vase
    • he tumped over his beer
  • verb overcome with amazement
    boggle; flabbergast.
    • This boggles the mind!
WordNet

brick over

  • verb wall up with brick
    brick up; brick in.
WordNet

bridge over

  • verb suffice for a period between two points
    keep going; bridge over.
    • This money will keep us going for another year
  • verb connect or reduce the distance between
    bridge.
WordNet

brim over

  • verb flow or run over (a limit or brim)
    run over; overflow; brim over; overrun.
WordNet

bubble over

  • verb overflow with a certain feeling
    bubble over; overflow.
    • The children bubbled over with joy
    • My boss was bubbling over with anger
WordNet

burned-over

  • adjective satellite destroyed or badly damaged by fire
    burned; burnt-out; burnt; burned-out.
    • a row of burned houses
    • a charred bit of burnt wood
    • a burned-over site in the forest
    • barricaded the street with burnt-out cars
WordNet

cant over

  • verb heel over
    tilt; cant; slant; pitch.
    • The tower is tilting
    • The ceiling is slanting
WordNet

carry over

  • verb transfer or persist from one stage or sphere of activity to another
  • verb transport from one place or state to another
    • Adam would have been carried over into the life eternal
  • verb hold over goods to be sold for the next season
    carry over.
  • verb transfer from one time period to the next
    carry forward.
WordNet

carry-over

  • noun application of a skill learned in one situation to a different but similar situation
    transfer of training; transfer.
  • noun the accumulated and undivided profits of a corporation after provision has been made for dividends and reserves
    carry-forward.
WordNet

change over

  • verb make a shift in or exchange of; then we switched"
    shift; switch.
    • First Joe led
  • verb change from one system to another or to a new plan or policy
    convert.
    • We converted from 220 to 110 Volt
WordNet

check over

  • verb examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
    check into; suss out; check over; check up on; look into; check out; check.
    • check the brakes
    • Check out the engine
WordNet

chew over

  • verb reflect deeply on a subject
    ponder; ruminate; mull; muse; reflect; contemplate; meditate; chew over; mull over; excogitate; speculate.
    • I mulled over the events of the afternoon
    • philosophers have speculated on the question of God for thousands of years
    • The scientist must stop to observe and start to excogitate
WordNet

cloud over

  • verb become covered with clouds
    overcloud; cloud up.
    • The sky clouded over
  • verb become overcast
    • the sky clouded over
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come over

  • verb communicate the intended meaning or impression
    come across.
    • He came across very clearly
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crossing over

  • noun the interchange of sections between pairing homologous chromosomes during the prophase of meiosis
    crossover.
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deed over

  • verb transfer by deed
    grant.
    • grant land
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double over

  • verb bend over or curl up, usually with laughter or pain
    double up; double.
    • He doubled and vomited violently
WordNet

drool over

  • verb envy without restraint
    drool over.
WordNet

fall all over

  • verb display excessive love or show excessive gratitude towards
    • This student falls all over her former professor when she sees him
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fall over

  • verb fall forward and down
    fall over.
    • The old woman went over without a sound
WordNet

fall over backwards

  • verb try very hard to please someone
    bend over backwards.
    • She falls over backwards when she sees her mother-in-law
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film over

  • verb become glassy; lose clear vision
    film over; blur.
    • Her eyes glazed over from lack of sleep
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flip over

  • verb turn upside down, or throw so as to reverse
    flip over; flip.
    • flip over the pork chop
    • turn over the pancakes
WordNet

fork over

  • verb to surrender someone or something to another
    render; deliver; fork over; turn in; fork up; fork out.
    • the guard delivered the criminal to the police
    • render up the prisoners
    • render the town to the enemy
    • fork over the money
WordNet

frost over

  • verb become covered with a layer of ice; of a surface such as a window
    ice up; frost over.
    • When the wings iced up, the pilot was forced to land his plane
WordNet

get over

  • verb travel across or pass over
    traverse; track; get across; cover; cross; cut through; get over; cut across.
    • The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day
  • verb to bring (a necessary but unpleasant task) to an end
    • Let's get this job over with
    • It's a question of getting over an unpleasant task
  • verb improve in health
    bounce back; get well.
    • He got well fast
  • verb get on top of; deal with successfully
    master; subdue; overcome; surmount.
    • He overcame his shyness
WordNet

gill-over-the-ground

  • noun trailing European aromatic plant of the mint family having rounded leaves and small purplish flowers often grown in hanging baskets; naturalized in North America; sometimes placed in genus Nepeta
    field balm; ground ivy; runaway robin; Nepeta hederaceae; Glechoma hederaceae; alehoof.
WordNet

give the once over

  • verb look at with a critical eye
    give the eye.
    • When the movie star entered, all the women gave him the once over
WordNet

glance over

  • verb examine hastily
    rake; skim; run down; scan.
    • She scanned the newspaper headlines while waiting for the taxi
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glass over

  • verb become glassy or take on a glass-like appearance
    glass; glass over; glaze.
    • Her eyes glaze over when she is bored
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glaze over

  • verb become glassy; lose clear vision
    film over; blur.
    • Her eyes glazed over from lack of sleep
  • verb become glassy or take on a glass-like appearance
    glass; glass over; glaze.
    • Her eyes glaze over when she is bored
WordNet

gloss over

  • verb treat hurriedly or avoid dealing with properly
    slur over; skimp over; gloss over; skate over.
  • verb cover up a misdemeanor, fault, or error
    hush up; whitewash; gloss over.
    • Let's not whitewash the crimes of Stalin
    • She tried to gloss over her mistakes
WordNet

go over

  • verb hold a review (of troops)
    survey; review.
  • verb happen in a particular manner
    come off; go off.
    • how did your talk go over?
  • verb examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
    check into; suss out; check over; check up on; look into; check out; check.
    • check the brakes
    • Check out the engine
  • verb fall forward and down
    fall over.
    • The old woman went over without a sound
WordNet

going-over

  • noun a careful and thorough inspection
  • noun a severe scolding
    dressing down; upbraiding; castigation; earful; bawling out; chewing out.
WordNet

grass over

  • verb cover with grass
    grass.
WordNet

grow over

  • verb grow beyond or across
    overgrow.
    • The ivy overgrew the patio
WordNet

Grown over

  • covered with a growth.
Webster 1913

Half seas over

  • half drunk. Colloq. Spectator.
Webster 1913

half-seas-over

  • adjective satellite British informal for `intoxicated'
WordNet

hand over

  • verb to surrender someone or something to another
    render; deliver; fork over; turn in; fork up; fork out.
    • the guard delivered the criminal to the police
    • render up the prisoners
    • render the town to the enemy
    • fork over the money
WordNet

Hand over fist

  • adverb at a tremendous rate
    • made money hand over fist
WordNet
  • (Naut.), rapidly; hand over hand.
Webster 1913

Hand over hand, Hand over fist

  • by passing the hands alternately one before or above another; as, to climb hand over hand; also, rapidly; as, to come up with a chase hand over hand.
Webster 1913

Hand over head

  • negligently; rashly; without seeing what one does. Obs. Bacon.
Webster 1913

handing over

  • noun the act of passing something to another person
    passage.
WordNet

hash over

  • verb go back over
    rehash; retrograde.
    • retrograde arguments
WordNet

haze over

  • verb make less visible or unclear
    befog; fog; becloud; obscure; mist; obnubilate; cloud.
    • The stars are obscured by the clouds
    • the big elm tree obscures our view of the valley
WordNet

head over heels

  • adverb in disorderly haste
    head over heels; topsy-turvily; topsy-turvy; in great confusion.
    • we ran head over heels toward the shelter
WordNet

heels over head

  • adverb in disorderly haste
    head over heels; topsy-turvily; topsy-turvy; in great confusion.
    • we ran head over heels toward the shelter
WordNet

hold over

  • verb intimidate somebody (with a threat)
    • She was holding it over him
  • verb hold over goods to be sold for the next season
    carry over.
  • verb keep in a position or state from an earlier period of time
  • verb continue a term of office past the normal period of time
  • verb hold back to a later time
    prorogue; set back; defer; remit; put off; shelve; table; postpone; hold over.
    • let's postpone the exam
WordNet

hunch over

  • verb round one's back by bending forward and drawing the shoulders forward
    hump; hunch forward; hunch.
WordNet

ice over

  • verb become covered with a layer of ice; of a surface such as a window
    ice up; frost over.
    • When the wings iced up, the pilot was forced to land his plane
WordNet

keel over

  • verb turn over and fall
    • the man had a heart attack and keeled over
WordNet

kiss-me-over-the-garden-gate

  • noun annual with broadly ovate leaves and slender drooping spikes of crimson flowers; southeastern Asia and Australia; naturalized in North America
    prince's-plume; Polygonum orientale; princess feather; prince's-feather.
WordNet

knock over

  • verb cause to overturn from an upright or normal position
    tip over; tump over; upset; knock over; overturn; bowl over.
    • The cat knocked over the flower vase
    • the clumsy customer turned over the vase
    • he tumped over his beer
WordNet

lay over

  • verb interrupt a journey temporarily, e.g., overnight
    lay over.
    • We had to stop over in Venezuela on our flight back from Brazil
  • verb place on top of
    superimpose; superpose.
    • can you superimpose the two images?
WordNet

left over

  • adjective satellite not used up
    unexpended; leftover; odd; remaining; left.
    • leftover meatloaf
    • she had a little money left over so she went to a movie
    • some odd dollars left
    • saved the remaining sandwiches for supper
    • unexpended provisions
WordNet

linger over

  • verb delay
    dwell on.
WordNet

live over

  • verb experience again, often in the imagination
    relive.
    • He relived the horrors of war
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look out over

  • verb be oriented in a certain direction
    overlook; look out on; look across.
    • The house looks out on a tennis court
    • The apartment overlooks the Hudson
WordNet

look-over

  • noun a swift cursory examination or inspection
    look-over.
    • I gave him the once-over
WordNet

lord it over

  • verb act like the master of
    lord it over; put on airs; act superior.
    • He is lording it over the students
WordNet

maiden over

  • noun (cricket) an over in which no runs are scored
    maiden.
WordNet

make over

  • verb use again in altered form
    rework; retread.
    • retread an old plot
  • verb make new
    refashion; redo; remake.
    • She is remaking her image
WordNet

mist over

  • verb become covered with mist
    mist.
    • The windshield misted over
WordNet

mound over

  • verb form mounds over
    • The huts can be mounded over to form shelters
  • verb form a mound over
WordNet

mounded over

  • adjective having a wound formed over it
WordNet

move over

  • verb move in order to make room for someone for something
    ease up; give way; yield; give.
    • The park gave way to a supermarket
    • `Move over,' he told the crowd
WordNet

mull over

  • verb reflect deeply on a subject
    ponder; ruminate; mull; muse; reflect; contemplate; meditate; chew over; mull over; excogitate; speculate.
    • I mulled over the events of the afternoon
    • philosophers have speculated on the question of God for thousands of years
    • The scientist must stop to observe and start to excogitate
WordNet

once-over

  • noun a swift cursory examination or inspection
    look-over.
    • I gave him the once-over
WordNet

Over again

  • adverb anew
    once more; again; once again.
    • she tried again
    • they rehearsed the scene again
WordNet
  • once more; with repetition; afresh; anew. Dryden.
Webster 1913

Over against

  • opposite; in front. Addison.
Webster 1913

Over all

  • (Her.), placed over or upon other bearings, and therefore hinding them in part; said of a charge.
Webster 1913

Over and above

  • in a manner, or degree, beyond what is supposed, defined, or usual; besides; in addition; as, not over and above well. "He . . . gained, over and above, the good will of all people." L' Estrange.
Webster 1913

Over and over

  • adverb repeatedly
    over and over; again and again; time and time again; time and again.
    • the unknown word turned up over and over again in the text
WordNet
  • repeatedly; again and again.
Webster 1913

over and over again

  • adverb repeatedly
    over and over; again and again; time and time again; time and again.
    • the unknown word turned up over and over again in the text
WordNet

Over head and ears

  • beyond one's depth; completely; wholly; hopelessly; as, over head and ears in debt. = head over heels Colloq.
Webster 1913

over here

  • adverb in a specified area or place
    up here.
    • you shouldn't be up here
WordNet

over the counter security

  • noun a security traded in the over-the-counter market
    unlisted security; OTC security.
WordNet

over the counter stock

  • noun stock that is not listed and traded on an organized exchange
    OTC stock; unlisted stock.
WordNet

Over the left

  • . See under Left.
Webster 1913

over-arm

O"ver-arm` adjective
Definitions
  1. (Cricket, etc.) Done (as bowling or pitching) with the arm raised above the shoulder. See Overhard. "An over-arm with a round-arm bowler." R. A. Proctor.
Webster 1913

over-busy

O"ver-bus"y adjective
Definitions
  1. Too busy; officious.
Webster 1913

over-correct

  • verb make excessive corrections for fear of making an error
    overcompensate.
WordNet

over-crowding

  • noun excessive crowding
    congestion.
    • traffic congestion
WordNet

over-embellished

  • adjective satellite excessively elaborate or showily expressed
    purple; empurpled.
    • a writer of empurpled literature
    • many purple passages
    • an over-embellished story of the fish that got away
WordNet

over-garment

O"ver-gar`ment noun
Definitions
  1. An outer garment.
Webster 1913

over-refine

  • verb refine too much or with excess of subtlety
    overrefine.
    • He is overrefining this matter
WordNet

over-story

O`ver-sto`ry noun
Definitions
  1. (Arch.) The clearstory, or upper story, of a building.
Webster 1913

over-the-counter

  • adjective purchasable without a doctor's prescription
    nonprescription.
    • nonprescription drugs
    • an over-the-counter cold remedy
  • adjective satellite (of securities) not traded on a stock exchange
    otc.
    • over-the-counter stocks
WordNet

over-the-counter drug

  • noun a drug that is sold without a prescription
    over-the-counter drug.
WordNet

over-the-counter market

  • noun a stock exchange where securities transactions are made via telephone and computer rather than on the floor of an exchange
    OTC market.
WordNet

over-the-counter medicine

  • noun a drug that is sold without a prescription
    over-the-counter drug.
WordNet

over-the-hill

  • adjective satellite too old to be useful
    overage; overaged; superannuated.
    • He left the house...for the support of twelve superannuated wool carders"- Anthony Trollope
WordNet

over-the-shoulder bombing

  • noun a special case of loft bombing in which the bomb is released past the vertical so it is tossed back to the target
WordNet

over-the-top

  • adjective satellite far more than usual or expected
    extraordinary; sinful.
    • an extraordinary desire for approval
    • it was an over-the-top experience
WordNet

pass over

  • verb bypass
    jump; pass over; skip.
    • He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible
  • verb make a passage or journey from one place to another
    move through; transit; pass through; pass across.
    • The tourists moved through the town and bought up all the souvenirs
    • "Some travelers pass through the desert
  • verb travel across or pass over
    traverse; track; get across; cover; cross; cut through; get over; cut across.
    • The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day
  • verb fly over
    overfly.
    • The plane passed over Damascus
  • verb rub with a circular motion
    wipe.
    • wipe the blackboard
    • He passed his hands over the soft cloth
WordNet

pick over

  • verb separate or remove
    sieve out.
    • The customer picked over the selection
WordNet

plank over

  • verb cover with planks
    plank.
    • The streets were planked
WordNet

plaster over

  • verb apply a heavy coat to
    stick on; plaster.
WordNet

poring over

  • noun reading carefully with intent to remember
    perusal; perusing; studying.
WordNet

  • verb print (additional text or colors) onto an already imprinted paper
    overprint.
WordNet

pull over

  • verb steer a vehicle to the side of the road
    • The car pulled over when the ambulance approached at high speed
WordNet

pull the wool over someone's eyes

  • verb conceal one's true motives from especially by elaborately feigning good intentions so as to gain an end
    lead by the nose; play false; snow; hoodwink; bamboozle.
    • He bamboozled his professors into thinking that he knew the subject well
WordNet

put one over

  • verb fool or hoax
    fool; put on; gull; take in; dupe; befool; cod; put one across; slang.
    • The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone
    • You can't fool me!
WordNet

put over

  • verb communicate successfully
    get across.
    • I couldn't get across the message
    • He put over the idea very well
  • verb hold back to a later time
    prorogue; set back; defer; remit; put off; shelve; table; postpone; hold over.
    • let's postpone the exam
WordNet

puzzle over

  • verb try to solve
WordNet

queen it over

  • verb act like the master of
    lord it over; put on airs; act superior.
    • He is lording it over the students
WordNet

rejoicing over the law

  • noun (Judaism) a Jewish holy day celebrated on the 22nd or 23rd of Tishri to celebrate the completion of the annual cycle of readings of the Torah
    Rejoicing of the Law; Rejoicing in the Law; Simhat Torah; Simhath Torah; Simchas Torah; Shimchath Torah; Simchat Torah.
WordNet

roll over

  • verb make a rolling motion or turn
    • The dog rolled over
  • verb negociate to repay a loan at a later date for an additional fee
    • roll over a loan
  • verb re-invest (a previous investment) into a similar fund or security
    • She rolled over her IRA
WordNet

run over

  • verb injure or kill by running over, as with a vehicle
    run down.
  • verb flow or run over (a limit or brim)
    run over; overflow; brim over; overrun.
WordNet

sign over

  • verb formally assign ownership of
    sign away.
    • She signed away her rights
WordNet

skate over

  • verb treat hurriedly or avoid dealing with properly
    slur over; skimp over; gloss over; skate over.
WordNet

skim over

  • verb read superficially
    skim.
  • verb move or pass swiftly and lightly over the surface of
    skim.
WordNet

skimp over

  • verb treat hurriedly or avoid dealing with properly
    slur over; skimp over; gloss over; skate over.
WordNet

skin over

  • verb grow new skin over an injury
WordNet

skip over

  • verb bypass
    jump; pass over; skip.
    • He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible
WordNet

sleek over

  • verb cover up a misdemeanor, fault, or error
    hush up; whitewash; gloss over.
    • Let's not whitewash the crimes of Stalin
    • She tried to gloss over her mistakes
WordNet

sleep over

  • verb stay overnight
    sleep over.
    • The boy's friends were allowed to sleep over after the birthday party
WordNet

slobber over

  • verb envy without restraint
    drool over.
WordNet

slur over

  • verb treat hurriedly or avoid dealing with properly
    slur over; skimp over; gloss over; skate over.
WordNet

smooth over

  • verb treat hurriedly or avoid dealing with properly
    slur over; skimp over; gloss over; skate over.
WordNet

spill over

  • verb overflow with a certain feeling
    bubble over; overflow.
    • The children bubbled over with joy
    • My boss was bubbling over with anger
  • verb be disgorged
    spill out; pour out.
    • The crowds spilled out into the streets
WordNet

spread over

  • verb form a cover over
    cover.
    • The grass covered the grave
WordNet

stay over

  • verb stay overnight
    sleep over.
    • The boy's friends were allowed to sleep over after the birthday party
WordNet

stop over

  • verb interrupt a journey temporarily, e.g., overnight
    lay over.
    • We had to stop over in Venezuela on our flight back from Brazil
  • verb interrupt a trip
    stop.
    • we stopped at Aunt Mary's house
    • they stopped for three days in Florence
WordNet

stop-over

Stop"-o`ver adjective
Definitions
  1. Permitting one to stop over; as, a stop-over check or ticket. See To stop over, under Stop, v. i. Railroad Cant, U.S.
Webster 1913

sweep over

  • verb overcome, as with emotions or perceptual stimuli
    overtake; overwhelm; overpower; whelm; overcome.
WordNet

swing over

  • verb influence decisively
    swing.
    • This action swung many votes over to his side
WordNet

switch over

  • verb change over, change around, as to a new order or sequence
    switch; exchange.
WordNet

take over

  • verb seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession
    assume; arrogate; usurp; seize.
    • He assumed to himself the right to fill all positions in the town
    • he usurped my rights
    • She seized control of the throne after her husband died
  • verb take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities
    assume; take on; adopt.
    • When will the new President assume office?
  • verb free someone temporarily from his or her obligations
    relieve.
  • verb take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person
    assume; accept; bear.
    • I'll accept the charges
    • She agreed to bear the responsibility
  • verb take over ownership of; of corporations and companies
    buy out; buy up.
  • verb do over
    repeat.
    • They would like to take it over again
  • verb take up and practice as one's own
    adopt; take up; borrow.
  • verb take up, as of debts or payments
    absorb.
    • absorb the costs for something
WordNet

taking over

  • noun acquisition of property by descent or by will
    succession.
WordNet

talk over

  • verb speak with others about (something); talk (something) over in detail; have a discussion
    hash out; discuss.
    • We discussed our household budget
WordNet

think over

  • verb reflect deeply on a subject
    ponder; ruminate; mull; muse; reflect; contemplate; meditate; chew over; mull over; excogitate; speculate.
    • I mulled over the events of the afternoon
    • philosophers have speculated on the question of God for thousands of years
    • The scientist must stop to observe and start to excogitate
WordNet

tick over

  • verb run disconnected or idle
    idle.
    • the engine is idling
WordNet

tide over

  • verb suffice for a period between two points
    keep going; bridge over.
    • This money will keep us going for another year
WordNet

tip over

  • verb cause to overturn from an upright or normal position
    tip over; tump over; upset; knock over; overturn; bowl over.
    • The cat knocked over the flower vase
    • the clumsy customer turned over the vase
    • he tumped over his beer
  • verb turn from an upright or normal position
    tump over; overturn; tip over.
    • The big vase overturned
    • The canoe tumped over
WordNet

To bind over

  • to put under bonds to do something, as to appear at court, to keep the peace, etc.
Webster 1913

To blow over

  • to pass away without effect; to cease, or be dissipated; as, the storm and the clouds have blown over.
Webster 1913

To boil over

  • to run over the top of a vessel, as liquid when thrown into violent agitation by heat or other cause of effervescence; to be excited with ardor or passion so as to lose self-control.
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To break over

  • to overflow; to go beyond limits.
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To brim over

  • (literally or figuratively), to be so full that some of the contents flows over the brim; as, cup brimming over with wine; a man brimming over with fun.
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To bring over

  • . (a) To fetch or bear across. (b) To convert by persuasion or other means; to cause to change sides or an opinion.
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To call over

  • to recite separate particulars in order, as a roll of names.
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To come it over, To do over, To give over, etc.

  • See under Come, Do, Give, etc.
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To come over

  • . (a) To pass from one side or place to another. "Perpetually teasing their friends to come over to them." Addison. (b) To rise and pass over, in distillation.
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To come over to

  • to join.
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To crow over

  • to exult over a vanquished antagonist.
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To do over

  • . (a) To make over; to perform a second time. (b) To cover; to spread; to smear. "Boats . . . sewed together and done over with a kind of slimy stuff like rosin." De Foe.
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To draw over

  • to cause to come over, to induce to leave one part or side for the opposite one.
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To fall over

  • . (a) To revolt; to desert from one side to another. (b) To fall beyond. Shak.
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To fork over ∨ out

  • to hand or pay over, as money. Slang
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To gain over

  • to draw to one's party or interest; to win over.
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To get over

  • . (a) To pass over, surmount, or overcome, as an obstacle or difficulty. (b) To recover from, as an injury, a calamity.
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To give over

  • . (a) To yield completely; to quit; to abandon. (b) To despair of. (c) To addict, resign, or apply (one's self).
    The Babylonians had given themselves over to all manner of vice. Grew.
  • to cease; to discontinue; to desist.
    It would be well for all authors, if they knew when to give over, and to desist from any further pursuits after fame. Addison.
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To go heels over head

  • to turn over so as to bring the heels uppermost; hence, to move in a inconsiderate, or rash, manner.
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To go over

  • . (a) To traverse; to cross, as a river, boundary, etc.; to change sides.
    I must not go over Jordan. Deut. iv. 22.
    Let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan. Deut. iii. 25.
    Ishmael . . . departed to go over to the Ammonites. Jer. xli. 10.
    (b) To read, or study; to examine; to review; as, to go over one's accounts.
    If we go over the laws of Christianity, we shall find that . . . they enjoin the same thing. Tillotson.
    (c) To transcend; to surpass. (d) To be postponed; as, the bill went over for the session. (e) (Chem.) To be converted (into a specified substance or material); as, monoclinic sulphur goes over into orthorhombic, by standing; sucrose goes over into dextrose and levulose.
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To go over to, ∨ To join, the majority

  • to die.
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To hand over

  • to yield control of; to surrender; to deliver up.
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To hang over

  • . (a) To project at the top. (b) To impend over.
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To haul over the coals

  • to call to account; to scold or censure. Colloq.
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To help over

  • to enable to surmount; as, to help one over an obstacle.
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To hold over

  • to remain in office, possession, etc., beyond a certain date.
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To keel over

  • to upset; to capsize. Colloq.
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To lay over

  • to spread over; to cover.
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To lie over

  • . (a) To remain unpaid after the time when payment is due, as a note in bank. (b) To be deferred to some future occasion, as a resolution in a public deliberative body.
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To make over

  • to transfer the title of; to convey; to alienate; as, he made over his estate in trust or in fee.
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To pass over

  • to go from one side or end to the other; to cross, as a river, road, or bridge.
  • to overlook; not to note or resent; as, to pass over an affront.
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To post over

  • to hurry over. Obs. Fuller.
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To put over

  • . (a) To place (some one) in authority over; as, to put a general over a division of an army. (b) To refer .
    For the certain knowledge of that knowledge of that truth put you o'er to heaven and to my mother. Shak.
    (c) To defer; to postpone; as, the court put over the cause to the next term. (d) To transfer (a person or thing) across; as, to put one over the river .
  • (Naut.), to sail over or across.
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To run over

  • (Mach.), to have rotation in such direction that the crank pin traverses the upper, or front, half of its path in the forward, or outward, stroke; said of a crank which drives, or is driven by, a reciprocating piece.
  • . (a) To overflow; as, a cup runs over, or the liquor runs over. (b) To go over, examine, or rehearse cursorily . (c) To ride or drive over; as, to run over a child.
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To set over

  • . (a) To appoint or constitute as supervisor, inspector, ruler, or commander. (b) To assign; to transfer; to convey.
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To slight over

  • to run over in haste; to perform superficially; to treat carelessly; as, to slight over a theme. "They will but slight it over."
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To stop over

  • to stop at a station beyond the time of the departure of the train on which one came, with the purpose of continuing one's journey on a subsequent train; to break one's journey. Railroad Cant, U.S.
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To take over

  • to undertake; to take the management of. Eng. Cross (Life of G. Eliot).
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To talk over

  • . (a) To talk about; to have conference respecting; to deliberate upon; to discuss; as, to talk over a matter or plan. (b) To change the mind or opinion of by talking; to convince; as, to talk over an opponent.
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To throw over

  • to abandon; to betray. Cf. To throw overboard, under Overboard.
  • to abandon the cause of; to desert; to discard; as, to throw over a friend in difficulties.
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To tip over

  • to overturn.
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To turn over

  • to turn from side to side; to roll; to tumble.
  • . (a) To change or reverse the position of; to overset; to overturn; to cause to roll over. (b) To transfer; as, to turn over business to another hand. (c) To read or examine, as a book, while, turning the leaves. "We turned o'er many books together." Shak. (d) To handle in business; to do business to the amount of; as, he turns over millions a year. Colloq.
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To turn over a new leaf

  • to make a radical change for the better in one's way of living or doing. Colloq.
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To walk over

  • in racing, to go over a course at a walk; said of a horse when there is no other entry; hence, colloquially, to gain an easy victory in any contest. = to win in a walk.
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To watch over

  • to be cautiously observant of; to inspect, superintend, and guard.
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tump over

  • verb cause to overturn from an upright or normal position
    tip over; tump over; upset; knock over; overturn; bowl over.
    • The cat knocked over the flower vase
    • the clumsy customer turned over the vase
    • he tumped over his beer
  • verb turn from an upright or normal position
    tump over; overturn; tip over.
    • The big vase overturned
    • The canoe tumped over
WordNet

turn over

  • verb place into the hands or custody of
    give; reach; hand; pass; pass on.
    • hand me the spoon, please
    • Turn the files over to me, please
    • He turned over the prisoner to his lawyers
  • verb cause to overturn from an upright or normal position
    tip over; tump over; upset; knock over; overturn; bowl over.
    • The cat knocked over the flower vase
    • the clumsy customer turned over the vase
    • he tumped over his beer
  • verb move by turning over or rotating
    roll.
    • The child rolled down the hill
    • turn over on your left side
  • verb turn up, loosen, or remove earth
    delve; dig; cut into.
    • Dig we must
    • turn over the soil for aeration
  • verb do business worth a certain amount of money
    • The company turns over ten million dollars a year
  • verb cause to move around a center so as to show another side of
    turn.
    • turn a page of a book
  • verb turn from an upright or normal position
    tump over; overturn; tip over.
    • The big vase overturned
    • The canoe tumped over
  • verb turn upside down, or throw so as to reverse
    flip over; flip.
    • flip over the pork chop
    • turn over the pancakes
  • verb think about carefully; weigh
    moot; deliberate; consider; debate.
    • They considered the possibility of a strike
    • Turn the proposal over in your mind
WordNet

voice over

  • noun the voice on an unseen commentator in a film of television program
WordNet

walk over

  • verb beat easily
    • The local team walked over their old rivals for the championship
WordNet

walk-over

Walk"-o`ver noun
Definitions
  1. In racing, the going over a course by a horse which has no competitor for the prize; hence, colloquially, a one-sided contest; an uncontested, or an easy, victory. = a walk; a cake-walk.
Webster 1913

watch over

  • verb follow with the eyes or the mind
    follow; observe; watch; keep an eye on.
    • Keep an eye on the baby, please!
    • The world is watching Sarajevo
    • She followed the men with the binoculars
WordNet

well over

  • verb flow or run over (a limit or brim)
    run over; overflow; brim over; overrun.
WordNet

win over

  • verb make (someone) agree, understand, or realize the truth or validity of something
    convert; convince.
    • He had finally convinced several customers of the advantages of his product
WordNet

work over

  • verb give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression
    beat; beat up.
    • Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night
    • The teacher used to beat the students
WordNet