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act out

  • verb represent an incident, state, or emotion by action, especially on stage
    • She could act neurotic anxiety
  • verb act out; represent or perform as if in a play
    reenact; enact.
    • She reenacted what had happened earlier that day
WordNet

acting out

  • noun a (usually irritating) impulsive and uncontrollable outburst by a problem child or a neurotic adult
  • noun (psychiatry) the display of previously inhibited emotions (often in actions rather than words); considered to be healthy and therapeutic
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air out

  • verb expose to fresh air
    aerate; air.
    • aerate your old sneakers
  • verb expose to cool or cold air so as to cool or freshen
    vent; ventilate; air.
    • air the old winter clothes
    • air out the smoke-filled rooms
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all get out

  • noun an unimaginably large amount
    billy-ho; billyo; billyoh.
    • British say `it rained like billyo' where Americans say `it rained like all get out'
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all-out

  • adjective satellite using all available resources
    full-scale.
    • all-out war
    • a full-scale campaign against nuclear power plants
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ask out

  • verb make a date
    invite out; ask out.
    • Has he asked you out yet?
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average out

  • verb compute the average of
    average.
  • verb amount to or come to an average, without loss or gain
    average.
    • The number of hours I work per work averages out to 40
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babble out

  • verb divulge confidential information or secrets
    peach; babble; spill the beans; babble out; tattle; blab out; sing; blab; talk.
    • Be careful--his secretary talks
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back out

  • verb move out of a space backwards
    • He backed out of the driveway
  • verb make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity
    back away; back out; crawfish; pull back; pull in one's horns; withdraw; retreat.
    • We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him
    • He backed out of his earlier promise
    • The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns
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bail out

  • verb free on bail
  • verb remove (water) from a boat by dipping and throwing over the side
    bail out.
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bale out

  • verb remove (water) from a boat by dipping and throwing over the side
    bail out.
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bang out

  • verb play loudly
    • They banged out `The star-spangled banner'
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bawl out

  • verb censure severely or angrily
    call on the carpet; rag; dress down; remonstrate; take to task; call down; jaw; lambast; trounce; scold; chide; berate; chew up; have words; rebuke; reprimand; reproof; lecture; bawl out; lambaste.
    • The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car
    • The deputy ragged the Prime Minister
    • The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup
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bawling out

  • noun a severe scolding
    going-over; dressing down; upbraiding; castigation; earful; bawling out.
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bear out

  • verb support with evidence or authority or make more certain or confirm
    corroborate; support; underpin.
    • The stories and claims were born out by the evidence
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beat out

  • verb come out better in a competition, race, or conflict
    shell; beat; trounce; crush; vanquish.
    • Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship
    • We beat the competition
    • Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game
  • verb beat out a rhythm
    beat out; tap out.
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belly out

  • verb swell out or bulge out
    belly.
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belt out

  • verb sing loudly and forcefully
    belt.
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bite out

  • verb utter
    • She bit out a curse
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blab out

  • verb divulge confidential information or secrets
    peach; babble; spill the beans; babble out; tattle; blab out; sing; blab; talk.
    • Be careful--his secretary talks
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black out

  • verb obliterate or extinguish
    • Some life-forms were obliterated by the radiation, others survived
  • verb darken completely
    black out.
    • The dining room blackened out
  • verb suppress by censorship as for political reasons
    • parts of the newspaper article were blacked out
  • verb lose consciousness due to a sudden trauma, for example
    pass out; black out.
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blacken out

  • verb darken completely
    black out.
    • The dining room blackened out
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blank out

  • verb be unable to remember
    forget; block; draw a blank.
    • I'm drawing a blank
    • You are blocking the name of your first wife!
  • verb cut out, as for political reasons
    • several line in the report were blanked out
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blare out

  • verb announce loudly
    blare out.
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blat out

  • verb announce loudly
    blare out.
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blaze out

  • verb move rapidly and as if blazing
    blaze.
    • The spaceship blazed out into space
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blazon out

  • verb proclaim or announce in public
    cry.
    • before we had newspapers, a town crier would cry the news
    • He cried his merchandise in the market square
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bleach out

  • verb remove color from
    decolorize; decolorise; discolourise; discolorise; decolour; decolourise; bleach; decolor; decolourize; discolorize.
    • The sun bleached the red shirt
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block out

  • verb plan where and when songs should be inserted into a theatrical production, or plan a theatrical production in general
  • verb prevent from entering
    screen.
    • block out the strong sunlight
  • verb shield from light
    mask.
  • verb indicate roughly
    • We sketched out our plan
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blossom out

  • verb develop or come to a promising stage
    blossom; unfold; blossom forth.
    • Youth blossomed into maturity
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blot out

  • verb make undecipherable or imperceptible by obscuring or concealing
    hide; obscure; obliterate; veil.
    • a hidden message
    • a veiled threat
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blotted out

  • adjective satellite reduced to nothingness
    obliterate; obliterated.
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blow out

  • verb melt, break, or become otherwise unusable
    blow; blow out.
    • The lightbulbs blew out
    • The fuse blew
  • verb put out, as of fires, flames, or lights
    blow out; extinguish; quench.
    • Too big to be extinguished at once, the forest fires at best could be contained
    • quench the flames
    • snuff out the candles
  • verb erupt in an uncontrolled manner
    • The oil well blew out
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blow out of the water

  • verb surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off
    take aback; shock; ball over; floor.
    • I was floored when I heard that I was promoted
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blow-out

Blow"-out` noun
Definitions
  1. The cleaning of the flues of a boiler from scale, etc., by a blast of steam.
Webster 1913

blubber out

  • verb utter while crying
    blubber.
WordNet

bluff out

  • verb deceive an opponent by a bold bet on an inferior hand with the result that the opponent withdraws a winning hand
    bluff.
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blunder out

  • verb utter impulsively
    blurt; ejaculate; blunder out; blunder.
    • He blurted out the secret
    • He blundered his stupid ideas
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blurt out

  • verb utter impulsively
    blurt; ejaculate; blunder out; blunder.
    • He blurted out the secret
    • He blundered his stupid ideas
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bolt out

  • verb leave suddenly and as if in a hurry
    bolt out; bolt; run off; beetle off.
    • The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas
    • When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out
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bomb out

  • verb make somebody homeless by destroying their houses with bombs
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boom out

  • verb make a deep hollow sound
    boom.
    • Her voice booms out the words of the song
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boot out

  • verb remove from a position or office
    oust; expel; boot out; drum out; kick out.
    • The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds
  • verb put out or expel from a place
    eject; chuck out; turf out; boot out; exclude.
    • The unruly student was excluded from the game
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bottom out

  • verb reach the low point
    • Prices bottomed out and started to rise again after a while
  • verb hit the ground
    • the car bottomed out where the driveway meets the road
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bounce out

  • verb bounce a ball so that it becomes an out
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bow out

  • verb remove oneself from an obligation
    back down; back off; bow out; chicken out.
    • He bowed out when he heard how much work was involved
  • verb retire gracefully
    withdraw.
    • He bowed out when he realized he could no longer handle the demands of the chairmanship
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bracket out

  • verb place into brackets
    bracket.
    • Please bracket this remark
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branch out

  • verb vary in order to spread risk or to expand
    diversify; broaden.
    • The company diversified
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brave out

  • verb face and withstand with courage
    weather; brave; endure.
    • She braved the elements
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break out

  • verb start abruptly
    erupt.
    • After 1989, peace broke out in the former East Bloc
  • verb begin suddenly and sometimes violently
    • He broke out shouting
  • verb move away or escape suddenly
    break; break away.
    • The horses broke from the stable
    • Three inmates broke jail
    • Nobody can break out--this prison is high security
  • verb take from stowage in preparation for use
  • verb become raw or open
    recrudesce; erupt.
    • He broke out in hives
    • My skin breaks out when I eat strawberries
    • Such boils tend to recrudesce
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breathe out

  • verb expel air
    exhale; expire.
    • Exhale when you lift the weight
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breathing out

  • noun the act of expelling air from the lungs
    exhalation; expiration.
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Bred out

  • degenerated. "The strain of man's bred out into baboon and monkey." Shak.
Webster 1913

bring out

  • verb make visible
    uncover; reveal; unveil.
    • Summer brings out bright clothes
    • He brings out the best in her
  • verb bring out of a specific state
    bring out.
  • verb prepare and issue for public distribution or sale
    bring out; release; issue; publish.
    • publish a magazine or newspaper
  • verb direct attention to, as if by means of contrast
    set off.
    • This dress accentuates your nice figure!
    • I set off these words by brackets
  • verb bring onto the market or release
    produce; bring on.
    • produce a movie
    • bring out a book
    • produce a new play
  • verb encourage to be less reserved
    • The teacher tried to bring out the shy boy
  • verb take out of a container or enclosed space
    bring out.
    • Get out your best dress--we are going to a party!
  • verb bring before the public for the first time, as of an actor, song, etc.
    introduce.
  • verb make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret
    disclose; reveal; unwrap; bring out; expose; let on; discover; divulge; break; give away.
    • The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold
    • The actress won't reveal how old she is
    • bring out the truth
    • he broke the news to her
    • unwrap the evidence in the murder case
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bug out

  • verb bulge outward
    bulge; bug out; pop; come out; start; protrude; bulge out.
    • His eyes popped
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bulge out

  • verb bulge outward
    bulge; bug out; pop; come out; start; protrude; bulge out.
    • His eyes popped
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burn out

  • verb melt, break, or become otherwise unusable
    blow; blow out.
    • The lightbulbs blew out
    • The fuse blew
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burned-out

  • adjective satellite exhausted as a result of longtime stress
    burned-out.
    • she was burned-out before she was 30
  • adjective satellite inoperative as a result of heat or friction
    burned-out.
    • a burned-out picture tube
  • adjective satellite destroyed or badly damaged by fire
    burned-over; burned; burnt; burned-out.
    • a row of burned houses
    • a charred bit of burnt wood
    • a burned-over site in the forest
    • barricaded the street with burnt-out cars
WordNet

burnt-out

  • adjective satellite exhausted as a result of longtime stress
    burned-out.
    • she was burned-out before she was 30
  • adjective satellite inoperative as a result of heat or friction
    burned-out.
    • a burned-out picture tube
  • adjective satellite destroyed or badly damaged by fire
    burned-over; burned; burnt; burned-out.
    • a row of burned houses
    • a charred bit of burnt wood
    • a burned-over site in the forest
    • barricaded the street with burnt-out cars
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burst out

  • verb give sudden release to an expression
    • We burst out laughing
    • 'I hate you,' she burst out
  • verb appear suddenly
    burst out.
    • Spring popped up everywhere in the valley
  • verb erupt or intensify suddenly
    flare; break open; erupt; flare up; irrupt.
    • Unrest erupted in the country
    • Tempers flared at the meeting
    • The crowd irrupted into a burst of patriotism
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bush out

  • verb grow outward
    • the plant quickly bushed out
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buy out

  • verb take over ownership of; of corporations and companies
    take over; buy up.
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call out

  • verb utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy
    exclaim; call out; cry; shout; outcry.
    • `I won!' he exclaimed
    • `Help!' she cried
    • `I'm here,' the mother shouted when she saw her child looking lost
  • verb call out loudly, as of names or numbers
  • verb challenge to a duel
    • Aaron Burr called out Alexander Hamilton
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call-out

  • noun a challenge to a fight or duel
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caller-out

  • noun a person who announces the changes of steps during a dance
    caller.
    • you need a fiddler and a caller for country dancing
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camp out

  • verb live in or as if in a tent
    bivouac; camp; encamp; tent.
    • Can we go camping again this summer?
    • The circus tented near the town
    • The houseguests had to camp in the living room
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cancel out

  • verb wipe out the effect of something
    cancel out.
    • The new tax effectively cancels out my raise
    • The `A' will cancel out the `C' on your record
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carry out

  • verb put in effect
    fulfil; execute; accomplish; carry through; action; fulfill.
    • carry out a task
    • execute the decision of the people
    • He actioned the operation
  • verb pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue
    follow up; follow through; go through; carry out; put through; implement.
    • Did he go through with the treatment?
    • He implemented a new economic plan
    • She followed up his recommendations with a written proposal
WordNet

carrying out

  • noun the act of accomplishing some aim or executing some order
    implementation; execution.
    • the agency was created for the implementation of the policy
  • noun the act of performing; of doing something successfully; using knowledge as distinguished from merely possessing it
    performance; execution; carrying into action.
    • they criticised his performance as mayor
    • experience generally improves performance
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carve out

  • verb establish or create through painstaking effort
    • She carved out a reputation among her male colleagues
  • verb remove from a larger whole
    • the new start-up company carved out a large chunk of the market within a year
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cash out

  • verb choose a simpler life style after questioning personal and career satisfaction goals
    • After 3 decades in politics, she cashed out and moved to Polynesia
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cast out

  • verb expel from a community or group
    ostracize; blackball; shun; ban; ostracise; banish.
  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss away.
    • Put away your worries
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catch out

  • verb trap; especially in an error or in a reprehensible act
    catch out.
    • He was caught out
    • She was found out when she tried to cash the stolen checks
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cavern out

  • verb hollow out as if making a cavern
    cavern.
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chalk out

  • verb make a sketch of
    sketch.
    • sketch the building
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check out

  • verb examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
    check into; go over; check over; check up on; look into; check out; check.
    • check the brakes
    • Check out the engine
  • verb announce one's departure from a hotel
  • verb be verified or confirmed; pass inspection
    check.
    • These stories don't check!
  • verb trace
    run down.
    • We are running down a few tips
  • verb record, add up, and receive payment for items purchased
    • She was checking out the apples that the customer had put on the conveyer belt
  • verb withdraw money by writing a check
    cheque.
  • verb try to learn someone's opinions and intentions
    feel out; check out.
    • I have to sound out the new professor
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check-out procedure

  • noun the act of inspecting or verifying
    checkout; check.
    • they made a check of their equipment
    • the pilot ran through the check-out procedure
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chew out

  • verb censure severely or angrily
    call on the carpet; rag; dress down; remonstrate; take to task; call down; jaw; lambast; trounce; scold; chide; berate; chew up; have words; rebuke; reprimand; reproof; lecture; bawl out; lambaste.
    • The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car
    • The deputy ragged the Prime Minister
    • The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup
WordNet

chewing out

  • noun a severe scolding
    going-over; dressing down; upbraiding; castigation; earful; bawling out.
WordNet

chicken out

  • verb remove oneself from an obligation
    back down; back off; bow out; chicken out.
    • He bowed out when he heard how much work was involved
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chill out

  • verb become quiet or calm, especially after a state of agitation
    cool off; calm; calm down; simmer down; cool it; settle down.
    • After the fight both men need to cool off.
    • It took a while after the baby was born for things to settle down again.
WordNet

chuck out

  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss away.
    • Put away your worries
  • verb put out or expel from a place
    eject; chuck out; turf out; boot out; exclude.
    • The unruly student was excluded from the game
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chucker-out

  • noun a person whose duty is to throw troublemakers out of a bar or public meeting
    bouncer.
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churn out

  • verb perform in a mechanical way
  • verb produce something at a fast rate
    • He churns out papers, but they are all about the same topic
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clapped out

  • adjective satellite worn from age or heavy use and no longer able to operate (of cars or machines or people)
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clean out

  • verb empty completely
    clean out.
    • We cleaned out all the drawers
  • verb force out
    • The new boss cleaned out the lazy workers
  • verb deprive completely of money or goods
    • The robbers cleaned us out in a couple of hours
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clear out

  • verb move out and leave nothing behind
  • verb clear out the chest and lungs
    expectorate; clear out.
    • This drug expectorates quickly
  • verb empty completely
    clean out.
    • We cleaned out all the drawers
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clock out

  • verb register one's departure from work
    clock off; clock out.
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close out

  • verb make impossible, especially beforehand
    close out; preclude.
  • verb terminate by selling off or disposing of
    • He closed out his line of sports cars
  • verb terminate
    • We closed out our account
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comb out

  • verb remove unwanted elements
    comb out.
    • The company weeded out the incompetent people
    • The new law weeds out the old inequities
  • verb smoothen and neaten with or as with a comb
    comb; disentangle.
    • comb your hair before dinner
    • comb the wool
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comb-out

  • noun the act of removing tangles from you hair with a comb
    teasing.
  • noun the act of carefully weeding out unwanted things or people
    • the department got a good comb-out
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come out

  • verb appear or become visible; make a showing
    turn up; show up; surface; come on.
    • She turned up at the funeral
    • I hope the list key is going to surface again
  • verb be issued or published
    appear.
    • Did your latest book appear yet?
    • The new Woody Allen film hasn't come out yet
  • verb come out of
    emerge; egress; go forth; issue; come forth.
    • Water issued from the hole in the wall
    • The words seemed to come out by themselves
  • verb result or end
    come out.
    • How will the game turn out?
  • verb come off
    come out.
    • His hair and teeth fell out
  • verb take a place in a competition; often followed by an ordinal
    place; come in.
    • Jerry came in third in the Marathon
  • verb make oneself visible; take action
    step forward; step to the fore; come to the fore; step up; come forward.
    • Young people should step to the fore and help their peers
  • verb bulge outward
    bulge; bug out; pop; come out; start; protrude; bulge out.
    • His eyes popped
  • verb to state openly and publicly one's homosexuality
    come out; out.
    • This actor outed last year
  • verb be made known; be disclosed or revealed
    out.
    • The truth will out
  • verb break out
    push through; erupt; break through.
    • The tooth erupted and had to be extracted
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come out of the closet

  • verb to state openly and publicly one's homosexuality
    come out; out.
    • This actor outed last year
WordNet

come-outer

Come-out"er noun
Definitions
  1. One who comes out or withdraws from a religious or other organization; a radical reformer. Colloq. U. S.
Webster 1913

conk out

  • verb stop operating or functioning
    die; give way; break; go; go bad; conk out; fail; break down.
    • The engine finally went
    • The car died on the road
    • The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town
    • The coffee maker broke
    • The engine failed on the way to town
    • her eyesight went after the accident
  • verb use up all one's strength and energy and stop working
    peter out; poop out; run down; conk out.
    • At the end of the march, I pooped out
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contract out

  • verb assign a job to someone outside one's own business
  • verb refuse to pay a levy to a union for political use
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cook out

  • verb cook outdoors on a barbecue grill
    barbecue; barbeque.
    • let's barbecue that meat
    • We cooked out in the forest
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cop out

  • verb choose not to do something, as out of fear of failing
    cop out.
    • She copped out when she was supposed to get into the hang glider
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copy out

  • verb copy very carefully and as accurately as possible
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core out

  • verb remove the interior of
    core out; hollow.
    • hollow out a tree trunk
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cough out

  • verb discharge (phlegm or sputum) from the lungs and out of the mouth
    cough out; expectorate; spit up; cough up.
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count out

  • verb declare the loser
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crank out

  • verb produce in a routine or monotonous manner
    crank out.
    • We have to crank out publications in order to receive funding
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crawfish out

  • verb make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity
    back away; back out; crawfish; pull back; pull in one's horns; withdraw; retreat.
    • We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him
    • He backed out of his earlier promise
    • The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns
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crop out

  • verb appear at the surface
    basset.
    • A seam of coal bassets
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cross out

  • verb remove from a list
    mark; cross out; strike off; cross off.
    • Cross the name of the dead person off the list
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crowd out

  • verb press, force, or thrust out of a small space
    crowd out.
    • The weeds crowded out the flowers
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crush out

  • verb extinguish by crushing
    extinguish; crush out; press out.
    • stub out your cigar
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cry out

  • verb utter aloud; often with surprise, horror, or joy
    exclaim; call out; cry; shout; outcry.
    • `I won!' he exclaimed
    • `Help!' she cried
    • `I'm here,' the mother shouted when she saw her child looking lost
WordNet

cry out for

  • verb need badly or desperately
    cry for.
    • This question cries out for an answer
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cull out

  • verb select desirable parts from a group or list
    winnow.
    • cull out the interesting letters from the poet's correspondence
    • winnow the finalists from the long list of applicants
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cut out

  • verb delete or remove
    • Cut out the extra text
    • cut out the newspaper article
  • verb form and create by cutting out
    • Picasso cut out a guitar from a piece of paper
  • verb cut off and stop
    cut off.
    • The bicyclist was cut out by the van
  • verb strike or cancel by or as if by rubbing or crossing out
    cut out.
    • scratch out my name on that list
  • verb intercept (a player)
    cut down.
  • verb cease operating
    • The pump suddenly cut out
  • adjective satellite having been cut out
    • the cut-out pieces of the dress
WordNet

cut-out

Cut"-out` noun
Definitions
  1. (Telegraphy) A species of switch for changing the current from one circuit to another, or for shortening a circuit.
  2. (Elec.) A divice for breaking or separating a portion of circuit.
Webster 1913

cutting out

  • noun surgical removal of a body part or tissue
    extirpation; excision; ablation.
WordNet

day in and day out

  • adverb without respite
    all the time.
    • he plays chess day in and day out
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day in day out

  • adverb for an indefinite number of successive days
    day after day.
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Day in, day out

  • from the beginning to the limit of each of several days; day by day; every day.
Webster 1913

deal out

  • verb administer or bestow, as in small portions
    dish out; deal; parcel out; dispense; distribute; dole out; administer; allot; lot; deal out; mete out.
    • administer critical remarks to everyone present
    • dole out some money
    • shell out pocket money for the children
    • deal a blow to someone
    • the machine dispenses soft drinks
WordNet

dealt out

  • adjective satellite given out in portions
    apportioned; doled out; dealt out; meted out.
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deck out

  • verb put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    rig out; dress up; fig out; overdress; trick up; deck out; prink; tog out; get up; fig up; deck up; fancy up; attire; tog up; gussy up.
    • She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera
    • The young girls were all fancied up for the party
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die out

  • verb become extinct
    die off.
    • Dinosaurs died out
  • verb cut or shape with a die
    die.
    • Die out leather for belts
WordNet

dig out

  • verb remove, harvest, or recover by digging
    dig; dig up.
    • dig salt
    • dig coal
  • verb dig out from underneath earth or snow
  • verb create by digging
    dig.
    • dig a hole
    • dig out a channel
WordNet

dine out

  • verb eat at a restaurant or at somebody else's home
    dine out.
WordNet

diner-out

Din"er-out` noun
Definitions
  1. One who often takes his dinner away from home, or in company.
    A brilliant diner-out, though but a curate. Byron.
Webster 1913

dish out

  • verb administer or bestow, as in small portions
    dish out; deal; parcel out; dispense; distribute; dole out; administer; allot; lot; deal out; mete out.
    • administer critical remarks to everyone present
    • dole out some money
    • shell out pocket money for the children
    • deal a blow to someone
    • the machine dispenses soft drinks
  • verb provide (usually but not necessarily food)
    dish; serve up; serve; dish up.
    • We serve meals for the homeless
    • She dished out the soup at 8 P.M.
    • The entertainers served up a lively show
WordNet

dole out

  • verb administer or bestow, as in small portions
    dish out; deal; parcel out; dispense; distribute; dole out; administer; allot; lot; deal out; mete out.
    • administer critical remarks to everyone present
    • dole out some money
    • shell out pocket money for the children
    • deal a blow to someone
    • the machine dispenses soft drinks
WordNet

doled out

  • adjective satellite given out in portions
    apportioned; doled out; dealt out; meted out.
WordNet

down-and-out

  • noun a person who is destitute
    • he tried to help the down-and-out
  • adjective satellite lacking resources (or any prospect of resources)
WordNet

drag out

  • verb last unnecessarily long
    drag on.
  • verb proceed for an extended period of time
    drag on; drag.
    • The speech dragged on for two hours
WordNet

draw out

  • verb cause to speak, "Can you draw her out--she is always so quiet"
  • verb lengthen in time; cause to be or last longer
    prolong; protract; extend.
    • We prolonged our stay
    • She extended her visit by another day
    • The meeting was drawn out until midnight
  • verb make more sociable
    • The therapist drew out the shy girl
  • verb deduce (a principle) or construe (a meaning)
    elicit; extract; educe; evoke.
    • We drew out some interesting linguistic data from the native informant
  • verb remove as if by suction
    draw out; aspirate.
    • aspirate the wound
  • verb remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense
    pull; pull out; pull up; draw out; extract.
    • pull weeds
    • extract a bad tooth
    • take out a splinter
    • extract information from the telegram
WordNet

drawn-out

  • adjective satellite relatively long in duration; tediously protracted
    lengthy; extended; protracted; prolonged.
    • a drawn-out argument
    • an extended discussion
    • a lengthy visit from her mother-in-law
    • a prolonged and bitter struggle
    • protracted negotiations
  • adjective satellite (used of speech) uttered slowly with prolonged vowels
WordNet

dress out

  • verb kill and prepare for market or consumption
    dress.
    • dress a turkey
WordNet

dried-out

  • adjective satellite thoroughly dried out
    desiccated.
    • old boxes of desiccated Cuban cigars
    • dried-out boards beginning to split
WordNet

drive out

  • verb force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings
    turn back; dispel; drive away; chase away; drive off; run off.
    • Drive away potential burglars
    • drive away bad thoughts
    • dispel doubts
    • The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers
  • verb force or drive out
    force out; rouse; drive out.
    • The police routed them out of bed at 2 A.M.
  • verb clear out the chest and lungs
    expectorate; clear out.
    • This drug expectorates quickly
WordNet

drop out

  • verb give up in the face of defeat of lacking hope; admit defeat
    quit; throw in; throw in the towel; chuck up the sponge; fall by the wayside; give up; drop by the wayside.
    • In the second round, the challenger gave up
  • verb withdraw from established society, especially because of disillusion with conventional values
    • She hasn't heard from her brother in years--he dropped out after moving to California
  • verb leave school or an educational program prematurely
    • Many students drop out because they are not prepared for our challenging program
WordNet

drown out

  • verb make imperceptible
    • The noise from the ice machine drowned out the music
WordNet

drum out

  • verb remove from a position or office
    oust; expel; boot out; drum out; kick out.
    • The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds
WordNet

dry out

  • verb become dry or drier
    dry.
    • The laundry dries in the sun
  • verb become empty of water
    run dry.
    • The river runs dry in the summer
  • verb remove the moisture from and make dry
    dry.
    • dry clothes
    • dry hair
WordNet

eat out

  • verb eat at a restaurant or at somebody else's home
    dine out.
WordNet

ebb out

  • verb flow back or recede
    ebb off; ebb down; ebb away; ebb.
    • the tides ebbed at noon
WordNet

edit out

  • verb cut and assemble the components of
    edit; cut.
    • edit film
    • cut recording tape
WordNet

eke out

  • verb supplement what is thought to be deficient
    eke out.
    • He eked out his meager pay by giving private lessons
    • Braque eked out his collages with charcoal
  • verb live from day to day, as with some hardship
    • He eked out his years in great poverty
  • verb make by laborious and precarious means
    eke out.
    • He eked out a living as a painter
  • verb obtain with difficulty
    eke out.
    • He eked out some information from the archives
WordNet

even out

  • verb adjust for
    even off; make up; compensate; counterbalance; even up; correct.
    • engineers will work to correct the effects or air resistance
  • verb make level or straight
    even; level; flush.
    • level the ground
  • verb become even or more even
    even.
    • even out the surface
  • verb make even or more even
    even.
WordNet

factor out

  • verb consider as relevant when making a decision
    factor in; factor.
    • You must factor in the recent developments
  • verb resolve into factors
    factor in; factor.
    • a quantum computer can factor the number 15
WordNet

fade out

  • verb become weaker
    dissolve; fade away.
    • The sound faded out
WordNet

fag out

  • verb exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress
    tire; wear down; jade; fag out; weary; fatigue; wear; tire out; outwear; fag; wear upon.
    • We wore ourselves out on this hike
WordNet

fall out

  • verb have a breach in relations
    • We fell out over a trivial question
  • verb come as a logical consequence; follow logically
    follow.
    • It follows that your assertion is false
    • the theorem falls out nicely
  • verb come off
    come out.
    • His hair and teeth fell out
  • verb leave (a barracks) in order to take a place in a military formation, or leave a military formation
    • the soldiers fell out
  • verb come to pass
    pass off; come about; pass; hap; happen; take place; occur; go on.
    • What is happening?
    • The meeting took place off without an incidence
    • Nothing occurred that seemed important
WordNet

falling out

  • noun a personal or social separation (as between opposing factions)
    rift; severance; break; breach; rupture.
    • they hoped to avoid a break in relations
WordNet

fan out

  • verb move outward
    fan out; spread; diffuse.
    • The soldiers fanned out
WordNet

far-out

  • adjective satellite informal terms; strikingly unconventional
    offbeat; quirky; kinky; far-out.
WordNet

farm out

  • verb arranged for contracted work to be done by others
    job; subcontract.
  • verb grant the services of or the temporary use of, for a fee
    farm out; hire out.
    • We rent out our apartment to tourists every year
    • He hired himself out as a cook
WordNet

fatten out

  • verb make fat or plump
    fatten up; fat; fill out; flesh out; fatten; fatten out; plump.
    • We will plump out that poor starving child
WordNet

feel out

  • verb try to learn someone's opinions and intentions
    feel out; check out.
    • I have to sound out the new professor
WordNet

ferret out

  • verb search and discover through persistent investigation
    ferret.
    • She ferreted out the truth
WordNet

fig out

  • verb put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    rig out; dress up; fig out; overdress; trick up; deck out; prink; tog out; get up; fig up; deck up; fancy up; attire; tog up; gussy up.
    • She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera
    • The young girls were all fancied up for the party
WordNet

figure out

  • verb find the solution to (a problem or question) or understand the meaning of
    lick; work; puzzle out; solve; figure out.
    • did you solve the problem?
    • Work out your problems with the boss
    • this unpleasant situation isn't going to work itself out
    • did you get it?
    • Did you get my meaning?
    • He could not work the math problem
WordNet

file out

  • verb march out, in a file
WordNet

fill out

  • verb write all the required information onto a form
    fill in; fill out; complete.
    • fill out this questionnaire, please!
    • make out a form
  • verb make bigger or better or more complete
    fill out.
  • verb supplement what is thought to be deficient
    eke out.
    • He eked out his meager pay by giving private lessons
    • Braque eked out his collages with charcoal
  • verb line or stuff with soft material
    pad.
    • pad a bra
  • verb make fat or plump
    fatten up; fat; fill out; flesh out; fatten; fatten out; plump.
    • We will plump out that poor starving child
  • verb become round, plump, or shapely
    fill out; round.
    • The young woman is fleshing out
WordNet

filter out

  • verb remove by passing through a filter
    filter; filtrate; filter out; strain.
    • filter out the impurities
WordNet

find out

  • verb establish after a calculation, investigation, experiment, survey, or study
    find; determine; ascertain.
    • find the product of two numbers
    • The physicist who found the elusive particle won the Nobel Prize
  • verb get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally
    pick up; get a line; discover; see; hear; learn; get wind; get word.
    • I learned that she has two grown-up children
    • I see that you have been promoted
  • verb find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort
    learn; watch; see; determine; ascertain; check.
    • I want to see whether she speaks French
    • See whether it works
    • find out if he speaks Russian
    • Check whether the train leaves on time
  • verb trap; especially in an error or in a reprehensible act
    catch out.
    • He was caught out
    • She was found out when she tried to cash the stolen checks
WordNet

finish out

  • verb fill out
    finish out.
    • These studies round out the results of many years of research
WordNet

first in first out

  • noun inventory accounting in which the oldest items (those first acquired) are assumed to be the first sold
    FIFO.
WordNet

fit out

  • verb provide with (something) usually for a specific purpose
    equip; fit; outfit.
    • The expedition was equipped with proper clothing, food, and other necessities
  • verb provide with clothes or put clothes on
    enclothe; garment; garb; raiment; apparel; habilitate; dress; tog; clothe.
    • Parents must feed and dress their child
WordNet

fitted out

  • adjective satellite prepared with proper equipment
    equipped.
    • equipped for service in the Arctic
  • adjective satellite furnished with essential equipment for a particular occupation or undertaking occupation
    outfitted.
    • a well outfitted expedition to the South Pole
WordNet

fizzle out

  • verb end weakly
    taper off; fizzle; fizzle out.
    • The music just petered out--there was no proper ending
WordNet

flake out

  • verb change from a waking to a sleeping state
    drowse off; drift off; drop off; nod off; dope off; fall asleep; doze off.
    • he always falls asleep during lectures
WordNet

flame-out

  • noun the failure of a jet engine caused by an interruption of the fuel supply or by faulty combustion
  • noun a complete or conspicuous failure
    • the spectacular flame-out of the company's stock cost many people their life savings
WordNet

flare out

  • verb become flared and widen, usually at one end
    flare.
    • The bellbottom pants flare out
WordNet

flat out

  • adverb in a blunt direct manner
    brusquely; bluffly; roundly; bluntly.
    • he spoke bluntly
    • he stated his opinion flat-out
    • he was criticized roundly
  • adverb at top speed
    like blue murder.
    • he ran flat out to catch the bus
    • he was off down the road like blue murder
WordNet

flatten out

  • verb become flat or flatter
    flatten.
    • The landscape flattened
WordNet

flesh out

  • verb make fat or plump
    fatten up; fat; fill out; flesh out; fatten; fatten out; plump.
    • We will plump out that poor starving child
  • verb add details, as to an account or idea; clarify the meaning of and discourse in a learned way, usually in writing
    expound; lucubrate; dilate; expatiate; elaborate; enlarge; exposit; expand.
    • She elaborated on the main ideas in her dissertation
  • verb become round, plump, or shapely
    fill out; round.
    • The young woman is fleshing out
WordNet

fleshed out

  • adjective satellite given substance or detail; completed
    full-clad.
    • did not spring full-clad from his imagination
    • a plan fleshed out with statistics and details
WordNet

flip out

  • verb react in an excited, delighted, or surprised way
    flip.
    • he flipped when he heard that he was accepted into Princeton University
  • verb go mad, go crazy
    flip.
    • He flipped when he heard that he was being laid off
WordNet

flood out

  • verb charge someone with too many tasks
    overwhelm; deluge.
WordNet

flow out

  • verb flow or spill forth
    effuse.
WordNet

follow out

  • verb pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue
    follow up; follow through; go through; carry out; put through; implement.
    • Did he go through with the treatment?
    • He implemented a new economic plan
    • She followed up his recommendations with a written proposal
WordNet

force out

  • noun a putout of a base runner who is required to run; the putout is accomplished by holding the ball while touching the base to which the runner must advance before the runner reaches that base
    force play; force out; force.
    • the shortstop got the runner at second on a force
  • verb force to leave (an office)
    depose.
  • verb terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or position
    give the axe; send away; give the sack; fire; dismiss; terminate; displace; sack; give notice; can.
    • The boss fired his secretary today
    • The company terminated 25% of its workers
  • verb force or drive out
    force out; rouse; drive out.
    • The police routed them out of bed at 2 A.M.
  • verb press, force, or thrust out of a small space
    crowd out.
    • The weeds crowded out the flowers
  • verb expel from one's property or force to move out by a legal process
    evict.
    • The landlord evicted the tenants after they had not paid the rent for four months
  • verb cause to come out in a squirt
    force out; squirt; eject.
    • the boy squirted water at his little sister
  • verb force with the thumb
    gouge.
    • gouge out his eyes
  • verb emit or cause to move with force of effort
    • force out the air
    • force out the splinter
WordNet

force-out

  • noun a putout of a base runner who is required to run; the putout is accomplished by holding the ball while touching the base to which the runner must advance before the runner reaches that base
    force play; force out; force.
    • the shortstop got the runner at second on a force
WordNet

forcing out

  • noun the act of expelling or projecting or ejecting
    expulsion; ejection; projection.
WordNet

fork out

  • verb to surrender someone or something to another
    hand over; render; deliver; fork over; turn in; fork up.
    • the guard delivered the criminal to the police
    • render up the prisoners
    • render the town to the enemy
    • fork over the money
WordNet

foul out

  • verb baseball: hit a ball such that it is caught from an out in foul territory
WordNet

freak out

  • noun a wild delusion (especially one induced by a hallucinogenic drug)
    disorientation.
  • verb lose one's nerve
    freak out; freak.
    • When he saw the accident, he freaked out
WordNet

freeze out

  • verb change from a liquid to a solid when cold
    freeze down; freeze.
    • Water freezes at 32 degrees Fahrenheit
WordNet

get out

  • verb move out of or depart from
    leave; exit; get out.
    • leave the room
    • the fugitive has left the country
  • verb take out of a container or enclosed space
    bring out.
    • Get out your best dress--we are going to a party!
  • verb move out or away
    get out.
    • The troops pulled out after the cease-fire
  • verb express with difficulty
    • I managed to get out a few words
  • verb bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover
    pull; draw; pull out; get out.
    • draw a weapon
    • pull out a gun
    • The mugger pulled a knife on his victim
  • verb be released or become known; of news
    break; get around.
    • News of her death broke in the morning
  • verb escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action
    escape; get off; get by; get away.
    • She gets away with murder!
    • I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities
WordNet

give out

  • verb give off, send forth, or discharge; as of light, heat, or radiation, vapor, etc.
    emit; give off.
    • The ozone layer blocks some harmful rays which the sun emits
  • verb give to several people
    give out; distribute; hand out.
    • The teacher handed out the exams
  • verb prove insufficient
    fail; give out.
    • The water supply for the town failed after a long drought
  • verb stop operating or functioning
    die; give way; break; go; go bad; conk out; fail; break down.
    • The engine finally went
    • The car died on the road
    • The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town
    • The coffee maker broke
    • The engine failed on the way to town
    • her eyesight went after the accident
WordNet

Giving out

  • anything uttered or asserted; an outgiving.
Webster 1913

go all out

  • verb perform a task as well as possible
    do one's best; give one's best; give full measure.
    • The cast gives full measure every night
WordNet

go out

  • verb move out of or depart from
    leave; exit; get out.
    • leave the room
    • the fugitive has left the country
  • verb leave the house to go somewhere
    • We never went out when our children were small
  • verb take the field
    • The soldiers went out on missions
  • verb become extinguished
    • The lights suddenly went out and we were in the dark
  • verb go out of fashion; become unfashionable
  • verb date regularly; have a steady relationship with
    date; see; go steady.
    • Did you know that she is seeing an older man?
    • He is dating his former wife again!
WordNet

go-out

Go"-out` noun
Definitions
  1. A sluice in embankments against the sea, for letting out the land waters, when the tide is out. Written also gowt.
Webster 1913

Going out, ∨ Goings out

  • . (Script.) (a) The utmost extremity or limit. "The border shall go down to Jordan, and the goings out of it shall be at the salt sea." Num. xxxiv. 12. (b) Departure or journeying. "And Moses wrote their goings out according to their journeys." Num. xxxiii. 2.
Webster 1913

going-out-of-business sale

  • noun a sale of all the tangible assets of a business that is about to close
    • during the Great Depression going-out-of-business sales were very common
WordNet

gouge out

  • verb make gouges into a surface
    • The woman's spiked heels gouged out the wooden floor
WordNet

grind out

  • verb produce in a routine or monotonous manner
    crank out.
    • We have to crank out publications in order to receive funding
WordNet

gross out

  • verb fill with distaste
    repel; revolt; disgust.
    • This spoilt food disgusts me
  • verb lose one's nerve
    freak out; freak.
    • When he saw the accident, he freaked out
WordNet

ground out

  • verb make an out by hitting the ball on the ground
WordNet

grub out

  • verb dig up
    grub up.
    • grub up roots and tree stumps
WordNet

hammer out

  • verb discuss vehemently in order to reach a solution or an agreement
    hammer out.
    • The leaders of the various Middle Eastern countries are trying to hammer out a peace agreement
WordNet

hand out

  • verb give to several people
    give out; distribute; hand out.
    • The teacher handed out the exams
WordNet

hang out

  • verb spend time in a certain location or with certain people
    • She hangs out at the corner cafe
WordNet

hash out

  • verb speak with others about (something); talk (something) over in detail; have a discussion
    talk over; discuss.
    • We discussed our household budget
WordNet

hear out

  • verb listen to every detail and give a full hearing to
WordNet

help out

  • verb be of help, as in a particular situation of need
    • Can you help out tonight with the dinner guests?
WordNet

hew out

  • verb make or shape as with an axe
    hew.
    • hew out a path in the rock
WordNet

hide out

  • verb be or go into hiding; keep out of sight, as for protection and safety
    hide.
    • Probably his horse would be close to where he was hiding
    • She is hiding out in a cabin in Montana
WordNet

hire out

  • verb grant the services of or the temporary use of, for a fee
    farm out; hire out.
    • We rent out our apartment to tourists every year
    • He hired himself out as a cook
WordNet

hold out

  • verb thrust or extend out
    extend; exsert; stretch forth; hold out; put out.
    • He held out his hand
    • point a finger
    • extend a hand
    • the bee exserted its sting
  • verb stand up or offer resistance to somebody or something
    resist; withstand; stand firm.
  • verb last and be usable
    wear; endure.
    • This dress wore well for almost ten years
  • verb wait uncompromisingly for something desirable
    • He held out for the dessert and did not touch the cheeses
  • verb continue to live through hardship or adversity
    live on; last; hold up; live; endure; go; survive.
    • We went without water and food for 3 days
    • These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America
    • The race car driver lived through several very serious accidents
    • how long can a person last without food and water?
WordNet

hole out

  • verb hit the ball into the hole
    hole.
WordNet

holler out

  • verb shout out
    holler.
    • He hollered out to surrender our weapons
WordNet

hollow out

  • verb remove the interior of
    core out; hollow.
    • hollow out a tree trunk
WordNet

hop out

  • verb get out of quickly
    get off.
    • The officer hopped out when he spotted an illegally parked car
WordNet

In and out

  • (Naut.), through and through; said of a through bolt in a ship's side. Knight.
Webster 1913

Ins and outs

  • nooks and corners; twists and turns.
Webster 1913

inside out

  • adverb with the inside facing outward
    • she turned the shirt inside out
  • adverb thoroughly; from every perspective
    • she knows this town inside out
WordNet

inside-out

  • adjective satellite with the inside surface on the outside
    inside-out.
WordNet

invite out

  • verb make a date
    invite out; ask out.
    • Has he asked you out yet?
WordNet

iron out

  • verb settle or put right
    put right; iron out.
    • we need to iron out our disagreements
  • verb press and smooth with a heated iron
    press; iron.
    • press your shirts
    • she stood there ironing
WordNet

Jack-out-of-office

  • one who has been in office and is turned out. Shak.
Webster 1913

jump out

  • verb be highly noticeable
    jump; jump out; leap out; stand out.
WordNet

jut out

  • verb extend out or project in space
    project; protrude; jut out; jut.
    • His sharp nose jutted out
    • A single rock sticks out from the cliff
WordNet

keep out

  • verb prevent from entering; shut out
    exclude; keep out; shut.
    • The trees were shutting out all sunlight
    • This policy excludes people who have a criminal record from entering the country
  • verb remain outside
WordNet

key out

  • verb identify as in botany or biology, for example
    name; describe; discover; identify; key; distinguish.
WordNet

kick out

  • verb force to leave or move out
    kick out; expel.
    • He was expelled from his native country
  • verb remove from a position or office
    oust; expel; boot out; drum out; kick out.
    • The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds
WordNet

kit out

  • verb supply with a set of articles or tools
    kit up; kit.
WordNet

knock out

  • verb eliminate
    • knock out a target
  • verb knock unconscious or senseless
    kayo; knock cold.
    • the boxing champion knocked out his opponent in a few seconds
  • verb destroy or break forcefully
    • The windows were knocked out
  • verb overwhelm with admiration
    • All the guys were knocked out by her charm
  • verb empty (as of tobacco) by knocking out
    • knocked out a pipe
WordNet

knock-down-and-drag-out

  • adjective satellite extremely violent
    knockdown-dragout.
    • a knock-down-and-drag-out fight
WordNet

knocked out

  • adjective satellite knocked unconscious by a heavy blow
    kayoed; out; stunned; KO'd.
WordNet

knocked-out

  • adjective satellite damaged
    • the gym has some of the most knocked-out equipment since Vic Tanny
WordNet

lash out

  • verb attack in speech or writing
    attack; assault; assail; snipe; round.
    • The editors of the left-leaning paper attacked the new House Speaker
WordNet

Lashing out

  • a striking out; also, extravagance.
Webster 1913

last in first out

  • noun inventory accounting in which the most recently acquired items are assumed to be the first sold
    LIFO.
WordNet

last out

  • verb hang on during a trial of endurance
    outride; last out; stay.
    • ride out the storm
WordNet

lay out

  • verb lay out orderly or logically in a line or as if in a line
    range; lay out; array.
    • lay out the clothes
    • lay out the arguments
  • verb get ready for a particular purpose or event
    set; set up.
    • set up an experiment
    • set the table
    • lay out the tools for the surgery
  • verb spend or invest
    • lay out thousands on gold
    • he laid out a fortune in the hope of making a huge profit
  • verb bring forward and present to the mind
    represent; present.
    • We presented the arguments to him
    • We cannot represent this knowledge to our formal reason
  • verb provide a detailed plan or design
    • She laid out her plans for the new house
WordNet

leak out

  • verb be leaked
    leak.
    • The news leaked out despite his secrecy
WordNet

leap out

  • verb be highly noticeable
    jump; jump out; leap out; stand out.
  • verb jump out from a hiding place and surprise (someone)
    rush out; leap out; burst forth.
    • The attackers leapt out from the bushes
WordNet

leave out

  • verb prevent from being included or considered or accepted
    omit; except; leave off; leave out; exclude.
    • The bad results were excluded from the report
    • Leave off the top piece
  • verb leave undone or leave out
    pretermit; omit; drop; overleap; overlook; miss; neglect.
    • How could I miss that typo?
    • The workers on the conveyor belt miss one out of ten
WordNet

let out

  • verb express audibly; utter sounds (not necessarily words)
    utter; let loose; emit.
    • She let out a big heavy sigh
    • He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand
  • verb make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret
    disclose; reveal; unwrap; bring out; expose; let on; discover; divulge; break; give away.
    • The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold
    • The actress won't reveal how old she is
    • bring out the truth
    • he broke the news to her
    • unwrap the evidence in the murder case
  • verb bring out of a specific state
    bring out.
  • verb make (clothes) larger
    widen.
    • Let out that dress--I gained a lot of weight
WordNet

let the cat out of the bag

  • verb divulge confidential information or secrets
    peach; babble; spill the beans; babble out; tattle; blab out; sing; blab; talk.
    • Be careful--his secretary talks
WordNet

lift out

  • verb take out or up with or as if with a scoop
    scoop; scoop up; lift out; take up.
    • scoop the sugar out of the container
WordNet

lights-out

  • noun a prescribed bedtime
  • noun (military) signal to turn the lights out
    taps.
WordNet

live out

  • verb live out one's life; live to the end
  • verb work in a house where one does not live; he can easily commute from his home"
    live out.
    • our cook lives out
WordNet

lock out

  • verb prevent employees from working during a strike
WordNet

log out

  • verb exit a computer
    log off.
    • Please log off before you go home
WordNet

look out

  • verb be vigilant, be on the lookout or be careful
    look out; watch.
    • Watch out for pickpockets!
  • verb to protect someone's interests
    • A man's gotta look out for his family
WordNet

look out on

  • verb be oriented in a certain direction
    overlook; look out on; look across.
    • The house looks out on a tennis court
    • The apartment overlooks the Hudson
WordNet

look out over

  • verb be oriented in a certain direction
    overlook; look out on; look across.
    • The house looks out on a tennis court
    • The apartment overlooks the Hudson
WordNet

luck out

  • verb succeed by luck
    hit the jackpot.
    • I lucked out and found the last parking spot in the lot
WordNet

mail out

  • verb transmit by mail
    • The company mailed out the catalog to all potential customers
WordNet

make out

  • verb detect with the senses
    recognize; spot; make out; tell apart; recognise; distinguish; discern.
    • The fleeing convicts were picked out of the darkness by the watchful prison guards
    • I can't make out the faces in this photograph
  • verb make out and issue
    cut; make out; issue.
    • write out a check
    • cut a ticket
    • Please make the check out to me
  • verb comprehend
    • I cannot make out what this politician is saying
  • verb proceed or get along
    fare; do; come; get along.
    • How is she doing in her new job?
    • How are you making out in graduate school?
    • He's come a long way
  • verb come to terms with
    contend; deal; cope; manage; get by; grapple; make do.
    • We got by on just a gallon of gas
    • They made do on half a loaf of bread every day
  • verb have sexual intercourse with
    love; fuck; sleep with; have it away; screw; have intercourse; get it on; lie with; hump; make love; get laid; have a go at it; bonk; eff; have sex; jazz; be intimate; know; have it off; bang; bed; do it; roll in the hay; sleep together.
    • This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm
    • Adam knew Eve
    • Were you ever intimate with this man?
  • verb kiss, embrace, or fondle with sexual passion
    neck.
    • The couple were necking in the back seat of the car
  • verb write all the required information onto a form
    fill in; fill out; complete.
    • fill out this questionnaire, please!
    • make out a form
  • verb imply or suggest
    • Your remarks make me out to be stupid
  • verb try to establish
    • She made out that she know nothing about the crime
WordNet

map out

  • verb plan, delineate, or arrange in detail
    map.
    • map one's future
WordNet

march out

  • verb march out (as from a defile) into open ground
    debouch.
    • The regiments debouched from the valley
WordNet

mark out

  • verb set boundaries to and delimit
    mark off.
    • mark out the territory
WordNet

max out

  • verb reach a maximum
    • I maxed out on all my credit cards
WordNet

measure out

  • verb determine the measurements of something or somebody, take measurements of
    mensurate; measure.
    • Measure the length of the wall
WordNet

mellow out

  • verb become more relaxed, easygoing, or genial
    mellow; melt.
    • With age, he mellowed
WordNet

mete out

  • verb administer or bestow, as in small portions
    dish out; deal; parcel out; dispense; distribute; dole out; administer; allot; lot; deal out; mete out.
    • administer critical remarks to everyone present
    • dole out some money
    • shell out pocket money for the children
    • deal a blow to someone
    • the machine dispenses soft drinks
WordNet

meted out

  • adjective satellite given out in portions
    apportioned; doled out; dealt out; meted out.
WordNet

move out

  • verb cause to leave
    remove; move out.
    • The teacher took the children out of the classroom
  • verb move out of one's old house or office
WordNet

muster out

  • verb release from military service
    discharge.
WordNet

nose out

  • verb recognize or detect by or as if by smelling
    nose out; scent out; smell out.
    • He can smell out trouble
WordNet

odd man out

  • noun someone regarded as eccentric or crazy and standing out from a group
    kook; queer duck; queer bird; odd fish; odd fellow.
WordNet

ooze out

  • verb release (a liquid) in drops or small quantities
    exudate; exude; ooze; transude.
    • exude sweat through the pores
WordNet

opt out

  • verb choose not to do something, as out of fear of failing
    cop out.
    • She copped out when she was supposed to get into the hang glider
WordNet

out and away

  • adverb by a considerable margin
    far and away; by far.
    • she was by far the smartest student
    • it was far and away the best meal he had ever eaten
WordNet

Out and out

  • . (a) adv. Completely; wholly; openly. (b) adj. Without any reservation or disguise; absolute; as, an out and out villain . As an adj. written also out-and-out.
Webster 1913

Out at, Out in, Out on

  • etc., elliptical phrases, that to which out refers as a source, origin, etc., being omitted; as, out (of the house and) at the barn; out (of the house, road, fields, etc., and) in the woods.
    Three fishers went sailing out into the west, Out into the west, as the sun went down. C. Kingsley.
    In these lines after out may be understood, "of the harbor," "from the shore," "of sight," or some similar phrase. The complete construction is seen in the saying: "Out of the frying pan into the fire."
Webster 1913

Out from

  • a construction similar to out of (below). See Of and From.
Webster 1913

out front

  • adverb leading or ahead in a competition
    ahead; in the lead.
    • the horse was three lengths ahead going into the home stretch
    • ahead by two pawns
    • our candidate is in the lead in the polls
    • way out front in the race
    • the advertising campaign put them out front in sales
WordNet

out in

  • verb enter a harbor
    call at.
    • the ship called in Athens
WordNet

out loud

  • adverb using the voice; not silently
    aloud.
    • please read the passage aloud
    • he laughed out loud
WordNet

Out of

  • adverb motivated by
    • idleness is the trait of being idle out of a reluctance to work
WordNet
  • a phrase which may be considered either as composed of an adverb and a preposition, each having its appropriate office in the sentence, or as a compound preposition. Considered as a preposition, it denotes, with verbs of movement or action, from the interior of; beyond the limit: from; hence, origin, source, motive, departure, separation, loss, etc.; opposed to in or into; also with verbs of being, the state of being derived, removed, or separated from. Examples may be found in the phrases below, and also under Vocabulary words; as, out of breath; out of countenance.
Webster 1913

out of bounds

  • noun a line that marks the side boundary of a playing field
    sideline.
WordNet

Out of cess

  • beyond measure, excessively. Shak.
Webster 1913

Out of character

  • unbecoming; improper.
Webster 1913

Out of conceit with

  • not pleased with. See under Conceit.
Webster 1913

Out of date

  • not timely; unfashionable; antiquated.
Webster 1913

Out of door, Out of doors

  • beyond the doors; from the house; in, or into, the open air; hence, figuratively, shut out; dismissed. See under Door, also, Out-of-door, Outdoor, Outdoors, in the Vocabulary. "He 's quality, and the question's out of door," Dryden.
Webster 1913

out of doors

  • adverb outside a building
    outside; alfresco; outdoors.
    • in summer we play outside
WordNet

Out of favor

  • disliked; under displeasure.
Webster 1913

Out of frame

  • not in correct order or condition; irregular; disarranged. Latimer.
Webster 1913

out of gear

  • adjective satellite not having gears engaged
    • threw the machine's pinion out of gear
WordNet

Out of hand

  • adverb out of control
    beyond control.
    • the riots got out of hand
WordNet
  • immediately; without delay or preparation. "Ananias . . . fell down and died out of hand." Latimer. most often seen in "dismiss out of hand"
Webster 1913

Out of harm's way

  • beyond the danger limit; in a safe place.
Webster 1913

Out of joint

  • not in proper connection or adjustment; unhinged; disordered. "The time is out of joint." Shak.
Webster 1913

Out of mind

  • not in mind; forgotten; also, beyond the limit of memory; as, time out of mind.
Webster 1913

out of nothing

  • adverb without warning
    out of nothing; from nowhere.
    • your cousin arrived out of thin air
WordNet

Out of one's head

  • beyond commanding one's mental powers; in a wandering state mentally; delirious. Colloq.
Webster 1913

Out of one's time

  • beyond one's period of minority or apprenticeship.
Webster 1913

Out of order

  • not in proper order; disarranged; in confusion.
Webster 1913

Out of place

  • adjective satellite of an inappropriate or misapplied nature
    inapposite.
  • adverb in a setting where one is or feels inappropriate or incongruous
    • he felt out of place in the lingerie shop
WordNet
  • not in the usual or proper place; hence, not proper or becoming.
Webster 1913

out of play

  • adjective satellite (of a ball) "a ball that is out of play is dead"
WordNet

Out of pocket

  • in a condition of having expended or lost more money than one has received.
Webster 1913

out of practice

  • adjective satellite impaired in skill by neglect
    rusty.
WordNet

Out of print

  • adjective satellite (of books) no longer offered for sale by a publisher
    • that edition is out of print
WordNet
  • not in market, the edition printed being exhausted; said of books, pamphlets, etc.
Webster 1913

Out of reach

  • adjective satellite inaccessibly located or situated
    unreached; unreachable; unapproachable.
    • an unapproachable chalet high in the mountains
    • an unreachable canyon
    • the unreachable stars
WordNet
  • beyond one's reach; inaccessible.
Webster 1913

Out of season

  • not in a proper season or time; untimely; inopportune.
Webster 1913

out of sight

  • adjective satellite not accessible to view
    hidden; concealed.
    • concealed (or hidden) damage
    • in stormy weather the stars are out of sight
  • adverb no longer visible
    out of sight.
    • the ship disappeared behind the horizon and passed out of sight
  • adverb quietly in concealment
    in hiding; doggo.
    • he lay doggo
WordNet

Out of sorts

  • wanting certain things; unsatisfied; unwell; unhappy; cross. See under Sort, n.
Webster 1913

out of stock

  • adjective satellite not available for sale or use
    • too many items are out of stock
WordNet

Out of temper

  • not in good temper; irritated; angry.
Webster 1913

out of the blue

  • adjective satellite not anticipated
    unforeseen; unlooked-for; unanticipated.
    • unanticipated and disconcerting lines of development"- H.W.Glidden
    • unforeseen circumstances
    • a virtue unlooked-for in people so full of energy
    • like a bolt out of the blue
  • adverb in a way that was not expected
    unexpectedly.
    • her brother showed up at the wedding out of the blue
WordNet

Out of the question

  • adjective satellite totally unlikely
    impossible; unimaginable; inconceivable.
WordNet
  • beyond the limits or range of consideration; impossible to be favorably considered.
Webster 1913

Out of the way

  • adverb extraordinary; unusual
    • such erratic behavior was out of the way for him
  • adverb improper; amiss;
  • adverb in a remote location or at a distance from the usual route
    • the restaurant is top-notch, but a little out of the way
  • adverb murdered
    • the mob boss wanted his rival out of the way
  • adverb dealt with; disposed of
    • I'm so relieved that my midterm is out of the way
  • adverb so as not to obstruct or hinder
    • put that box out of the way so that no one trips on it
WordNet
  • . (a) On one side; hard to reach or find; secluded . (b) Improper; unusual; wrong.
Webster 1913

Out of the woods

  • not in a place, or state, of obscurity or doubt; free from difficulty or perils; safe. Colloq.
Webster 1913

out of thin air

  • adverb without warning
    out of nothing; from nowhere.
    • your cousin arrived out of thin air
WordNet

Out of time

  • not in proper time; too soon, or too late.
  • not in harmony; discordant; hence, not in an agreeing temper; fretful.
Webster 1913

out of true

  • adjective satellite not accurately fitted; not level
    untrue.
    • the frame was out of true
    • off-level floors and untrue doors and windows
WordNet

Out of twist, winding, ∨ wind

  • not in warped condition; perfectly plain and smooth; said of surfaces.
Webster 1913

Out of use

  • adjective satellite closed to traffic
    blocked.
    • the repaving results in many blocked streets
WordNet
  • not in use; unfashionable; obsolete.
Webster 1913

out of view

  • adverb no longer visible
    out of sight.
    • the ship disappeared behind the horizon and passed out of sight
WordNet

out of wedlock

  • adverb of biological parents not married to each other
    illegitimately.
    • this child was born illegitimately
  • adverb of unwed parents
    outside marriage.
    • he was born out of wedlock
WordNet

out of whack

  • adjective satellite out of balance or out of adjustment
    • the front wheel of my bicycle is out of whack
WordNet

out of work

  • adjective satellite not having a job
    idle; jobless.
    • idle carpenters
    • jobless transients
    • many people in the area were out of work
WordNet

out or keeping

  • adjective satellite not in keeping with what is correct or proper
    unfitting; incompatible; inappropriate.
    • completely inappropriate behavior
WordNet

out to

  • adjective satellite fixed in your purpose
    bent on; dead set; bent.
    • bent on going to the theater
    • dead set against intervening
    • out to win every event
WordNet

Out to out

  • from one extreme limit to another, including the whole length, breadth, or thickness; applied to measurements.
Webster 1913

Out uponon!

  • equivalent to "shame upon!" "away with!" as, out upon you!
Webster 1913

Out West

  • in or towards, the West; specifically, in some Western State or Territory. U. S.
Webster 1913

out-and-out

  • adjective satellite complete and without restriction or qualification; sometimes used informally as intensifiers
    sheer; rank; right-down; downright; out-and-out; absolute.
    • absolute freedom
    • an absolute dimwit
    • a downright lie
    • out-and-out mayhem
    • an out-and-out lie
    • a rank outsider
    • many right-down vices
    • got the job through sheer persistence
    • sheer stupidity
WordNet

out-and-outer

  • noun someone who is excellent at something
  • adjective satellite complete and without restriction or qualification; sometimes used informally as intensifiers
    sheer; rank; right-down; downright; out-and-out; absolute.
    • absolute freedom
    • an absolute dimwit
    • a downright lie
    • out-and-out mayhem
    • an out-and-out lie
    • a rank outsider
    • many right-down vices
    • got the job through sheer persistence
    • sheer stupidity
WordNet

out-basket

  • noun a wood or metal receptacle placed on your desk to hold your outgoing material
    out-basket.
WordNet

out-herod

  • verb surpass someone in cruelty or evil
WordNet
Out-Her"od transitive verb
Definitions
  1. To surpass (Herod) in violence or wickedness; to exceed in any vicious or offensive particular. "It out-Herods Herod." Shak.
    Out-Heroding the preposterous fashions of the times. Sir W. Scott.
Webster 1913

out-migration

  • noun migration from a place (especially migration from your native country in order to settle in another)
    emigration; expatriation.
WordNet

out-of-body experience

  • noun the dissociative experience of observing yourself from an external perspective as though your mind or soul had left and was observing your body
WordNet

out-of-bounds

  • adjective satellite outside the foul lines
  • adjective satellite barred to a designated group
    off-limits.
    • that area is off-limits
WordNet

out-of-court settlement

  • noun resolution of a dispute prior to the rendering of a final decision by the trial court
WordNet

out-of-date

  • adjective satellite old; no longer valid or fashionable
    outdated; superannuated.
    • obsolete words
    • an obsolete locomotive
    • outdated equipment
    • superannuated laws
    • out-of-date ideas
WordNet

out-of-door

  • adjective located, suited for, or taking place in the open air
    outside; outdoor.
    • outdoor clothes
    • badminton and other outdoor games
    • a beautiful outdoor setting for the wedding
WordNet
Out`-of-door" adjective
Definitions
  1. Being out of the house; being, or done, in the open air; outdoor; as, out-of-door exercise. See Out of door, under Out, adv.
    Amongst out-of-door delights. G. Eliot.
Webster 1913

out-of-doors

  • noun where the air is unconfined
    open; open air; outdoors.
    • he wanted to get outdoors a little
    • the concert was held in the open air
    • camping in the open
WordNet

out-of-pocket

  • adjective satellite calling for the spending of cash
    • his out-of-pocket costs were $10
WordNet

out-of-school

  • adjective satellite not attending school and therefore free to work
    • opportunities for out-of-school youth
WordNet

out-of-the-box thinking

  • noun thinking that moves away in diverging directions so as to involve a variety of aspects and which sometimes lead to novel ideas and solutions; associated with creativity
    divergent thinking.
WordNet

out-of-the-way

  • adjective satellite out of the ordinary
    • out-of-the-way information
  • adjective satellite improper or even offensive
    • out-of-the-way remarks
  • adjective satellite remote from populous or much-traveled regions
    off the beaten track.
    • they found a quiet out-of-the-way resort
WordNet
Out`-of-the-way" adjective
Definitions
  1. See under Out, adv.
Webster 1913

out-of-town

  • adjective satellite happening in or being of another town or city
    • an out-of-town tryout
    • an out-of-town school
WordNet

out-patient

Out"-pa`tient noun
Definitions
  1. A patient who is outside a hospital, but receives medical aid from it.
Webster 1913

out-tray

  • noun a wood or metal receptacle placed on your desk to hold your outgoing material
    out-basket.
WordNet

outer boundary

  • noun the outside boundary or surface of something
    fringe; periphery.
WordNet

outer ear

  • noun the part of the ear visible externally
    external ear.
WordNet

outer garment

  • noun a garment worn over other garments
    overgarment.
WordNet

outer hebrides

  • noun a 130-mile long archipelago to the northwest of Scotland
WordNet

outer mongolia

  • noun a landlocked socialist republic in central Asia
    Mongolian People's Republic; Mongolia.
WordNet

outer planet

  • noun (astronomy) a major planet whose orbit is outside the asteroid belt (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Pluto)
WordNet

outer space

  • noun any location outside the Earth's atmosphere
    space.
    • the astronauts walked in outer space without a tether
    • the first major milestone in space exploration was in 1957, when the USSR's Sputnik 1 orbited the Earth
WordNet

pan out

  • verb be a success
    • The idea panned out
  • verb wash dirt in a pan to separate out the precious minerals
    pan off; pan.
WordNet

parcel out

  • verb administer or bestow, as in small portions
    dish out; deal; parcel out; dispense; distribute; dole out; administer; allot; lot; deal out; mete out.
    • administer critical remarks to everyone present
    • dole out some money
    • shell out pocket money for the children
    • deal a blow to someone
    • the machine dispenses soft drinks
WordNet

parceled out

  • adjective satellite given out in portions
    apportioned; doled out; dealt out; meted out.
WordNet

pass out

  • verb pass out from weakness, physical or emotional distress due to a loss of blood supply to the brain
    swoon; faint; conk.
  • verb give to several people
    give out; distribute; hand out.
    • The teacher handed out the exams
  • verb lose consciousness due to a sudden trauma, for example
    pass out; black out.
WordNet

pay out

  • verb expend, as from a fund
    disburse.
WordNet

peter out

  • verb end weakly
    taper off; fizzle; fizzle out.
    • The music just petered out--there was no proper ending
  • verb use up all one's strength and energy and stop working
    peter out; poop out; run down; conk out.
    • At the end of the march, I pooped out
WordNet

phase out

  • verb terminate gradually
WordNet

phase-out

  • noun the act or instance of a planned discontinuation
WordNet

pick out

  • verb pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives
    choose; select; take.
    • Take any one of these cards
    • Choose a good husband for your daughter
    • She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her
  • verb detect with the senses
    recognize; spot; make out; tell apart; recognise; distinguish; discern.
    • The fleeing convicts were picked out of the darkness by the watchful prison guards
    • I can't make out the faces in this photograph
WordNet

Picked out

  • ornamented or relieved with lines, or the like, of a different, usually a lighter, color; as, a carriage body dark green, picked out with red.
Webster 1913

pig out

  • verb overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself
    engorge; gormandize; gormandise; overgorge; glut; overeat; satiate; englut; stuff; ingurgitate; overindulge; gorge; gourmandize; binge; pig out.
    • She stuffed herself at the dinner
    • The kids binged on ice cream
WordNet

pip out

  • verb be killed or die;
    buy it.
WordNet

play out

  • verb deplete
    exhaust; run down; sap; tire.
    • exhaust one's savings
    • We quickly played out our strength
  • verb perform or be performed to the end
    • How will the election drama be played out?
  • verb play to a finish
    • We have got to play this game out, even thought it is clear that we have last
  • verb become spent or exhausted
    • The champion's strength played out fast
WordNet

Played out

  • adjective satellite drained of energy or effectiveness; extremely tired; completely exhausted
    exhausted; spent; dog-tired; worn out; played out; fagged; fatigued; washed-out.
    • the day's shopping left her exhausted
    • he went to bed dog-tired
    • was fagged and sweaty
    • the trembling of his played out limbs
    • felt completely washed-out
    • only worn-out horses and cattle
    • you look worn out
  • adjective satellite worn out
    • a played out deck of cards
WordNet
  • tired out; exhausted; at the end of one's resources. Colloq.
Webster 1913

plump out

  • verb depart suddenly
    • He plumped out of the house
  • verb make fat or plump
    fatten up; fat; fill out; flesh out; fatten; fatten out; plump.
    • We will plump out that poor starving child
WordNet

point out

  • verb make or write a comment on
    comment; notice; remark.
    • he commented the paper of his colleague
  • verb point out carefully and clearly
    signalise; signalize; call attention.
  • verb present and urge reasons in opposition
    remonstrate.
WordNet

pointing out

  • noun indication by demonstration
WordNet

poke out

  • verb reach outward in space
    poke out; extend.
    • The awning extends several feet over the sidewalk
WordNet

pooch out

  • verb round one's lips as if intending to kiss
    pooch.
WordNet

poop out

  • verb use up all one's strength and energy and stop working
    peter out; poop out; run down; conk out.
    • At the end of the march, I pooped out
WordNet

pooped out

  • a. pooped[c].
Webster 1913

pop out

  • verb appear suddenly
    burst out.
    • Spring popped up everywhere in the valley
  • verb bulge outward
    bulge; bug out; pop; come out; start; protrude; bulge out.
    • His eyes popped
  • verb exit briefly
    • He popped out for a quick coffee break
  • verb come out suddenly or forcefully
    • you stick a bill in the vending machine and the change pops out
WordNet

portion out

  • verb give out as one's portion or share
    deal; share; apportion; divvy up.
WordNet

pour out

  • verb express without restraint
    • The woman poured out her frustrations as the judge listened
  • verb pour out
    decant; pour.
    • the sommelier decanted the wines
  • verb be disgorged
    spill over; pour out.
    • The crowds spilled out into the streets
  • verb pour out
    effuse.
    • effused brine
WordNet

press out

  • verb extinguish by crushing
    extinguish; crush out; press out.
    • stub out your cigar
  • verb press from a plastic
    press.
    • press a record
  • verb obtain from a substance, as by mechanical action
    express; extract.
    • Italians express coffee rather than filter it
WordNet

prim out

  • verb dress primly
    prim; prim up.
WordNet

puff out

  • verb to swell or cause to enlarge, "Her faced puffed up from the drugs"
    puff up; puff; blow up.
    • puffed out chests
WordNet

pull out

  • verb move out or away
    get out.
    • The troops pulled out after the cease-fire
  • verb bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover
    pull; draw; pull out; get out.
    • draw a weapon
    • pull out a gun
    • The mugger pulled a knife on his victim
  • verb remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense
    pull; pull out; pull up; draw out; extract.
    • pull weeds
    • extract a bad tooth
    • take out a splinter
    • extract information from the telegram
  • verb remove oneself from an obligation
    back down; back off; bow out; chicken out.
    • He bowed out when he heard how much work was involved
WordNet

pull out all the stops

  • verb use all resources available
    • The organizers pulled out all the stops for the centennial meeting
WordNet

pulling out

  • noun a method of birth control in which coitus is initiated but the penis is deliberately withdrawn before ejaculation
    withdrawal method; coitus interruptus; onanism; withdrawal.
WordNet

punch out

  • verb register one's departure from work
    clock off; clock out.
WordNet

push out

  • verb push to thrust outward
    obtrude; push out.
WordNet

put out

  • verb to cause inconvenience or discomfort to
    disoblige; bother; inconvenience; incommode; discommode; trouble.
    • Sorry to trouble you, but...
  • verb put out considerable effort
    • He put out the same for seven managers
  • verb deprive of the oxygen necessary for combustion
    smother.
    • smother fires
  • verb thrust or extend out
    extend; exsert; stretch forth; hold out; put out.
    • He held out his hand
    • point a finger
    • extend a hand
    • the bee exserted its sting
  • verb put out, as of a candle or a light
    douse.
    • Douse the lights
  • verb be sexually active
    • She is supposed to put out
  • verb cause to be out on a fielding play
    retire.
  • verb retire
    • he was put out at third base on a long throw from left field
  • verb prepare and issue for public distribution or sale
    bring out; release; issue; publish.
    • publish a magazine or newspaper
  • verb administer an anesthetic drug to
    anesthetise; anaesthetise; put under; anaesthetize; anesthetize.
    • The patient must be anesthetized before the operation
    • anesthetize the gum before extracting the teeth
WordNet

put out feelers

  • verb make some preliminary investigations or test the waters
WordNet

puzzle out

  • verb find the solution to (a problem or question) or understand the meaning of
    lick; work; puzzle out; solve; figure out.
    • did you solve the problem?
    • Work out your problems with the boss
    • this unpleasant situation isn't going to work itself out
    • did you get it?
    • Did you get my meaning?
    • He could not work the math problem
WordNet

rain out

  • verb prevent or interrupt due to rain
    rain out.
    • The storm had washed out the game
WordNet

ration out

  • verb distribute in rations, as in the army
    ration.
    • Cigarettes are rationed
WordNet

ravel out

  • verb disentangle
    unravel; ravel.
    • can you unravel the mystery?
WordNet

reach out

  • verb move forward or upward in order to touch; also in a metaphorical sense
    reach.
    • Government reaches out to the people
  • verb reach outward in space
    poke out; extend.
    • The awning extends several feet over the sidewalk
  • verb attempt to communicate
    • I try to reach out to my daughter but she doesn't want to have anything to do with me
WordNet

read-out

  • noun the output of a computer in readable form
    readout.
  • noun the information displayed or recorded on an electronic device
    readout.
  • noun an electronic device the displays information is a visual form
    readout.
WordNet

reason out

  • verb decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion
    reason; conclude.
    • We reasoned that it was cheaper to rent than to buy a house
WordNet

rent out

  • verb grant the services of or the temporary use of, for a fee
    farm out; hire out.
    • We rent out our apartment to tourists every year
    • He hired himself out as a cook
WordNet

report out

  • verb return a bill after consideration and revision to a legislative body
WordNet

ride out

  • verb hang on during a trial of endurance
    outride; last out; stay.
    • ride out the storm
WordNet

rig out

  • verb put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    rig out; dress up; fig out; overdress; trick up; deck out; prink; tog out; get up; fig up; deck up; fancy up; attire; tog up; gussy up.
    • She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera
    • The young girls were all fancied up for the party
WordNet

right-side-out

  • adjective satellite of fabric or clothing
WordNet

ring out

  • verb sound loudly
    • a shot rang out
WordNet

rip out

  • verb burst out with a violent or profane utterance
    • ripped out a vicious oath
    • ripped out with an oath
WordNet

roll out

  • verb flatten or spread with a roller
    roll.
    • roll out the paper
  • verb straighten by unrolling
    straighten.
    • roll out the big map
WordNet

root out

  • verb pull up by or as if by the roots
    uproot; extirpate; deracinate.
    • uproot the vine that has spread all over the garden
  • verb destroy completely, as if down to the roots
    exterminate; uproot; extirpate; eradicate.
    • the vestiges of political democracy were soon uprooted" "root out corruption
WordNet

rough out

  • verb prepare in preliminary or sketchy form
    rough; rough in.
WordNet

round out

  • verb fill out
    finish out.
    • These studies round out the results of many years of research
  • verb make bigger or better or more complete
    fill out.
  • verb express as a round number
    round down; round; round off.
    • round off the amount
  • verb make round
    round; round off.
    • round the edges
WordNet

rout out

  • verb get or find by searching
    rout up.
    • What did you rout out in the library?
  • verb force or drive out
    force out; rouse; drive out.
    • The police routed them out of bed at 2 A.M.
  • verb cause to flee
    rout; expel.
    • rout out the fighters from their caves
WordNet

rub out

  • verb remove by or as if by rubbing or erasing
    efface; wipe off; erase; rub out.
    • Please erase the formula on the blackboard--it is wrong!
WordNet

rule out

  • verb make impossible, especially beforehand
    close out; preclude.
  • verb include or exclude by determining judicially or in agreement with rules
    rule in.
  • verb dismiss from consideration or a contest
    reject; eliminate; rule out.
    • John was ruled out as a possible suspect because he had a strong alibi
    • This possibility can be eliminated from our consideration
WordNet

run out

  • verb become used up; be exhausted
    • Our supplies finally ran out
  • verb flow off gradually
    drain.
    • The rain water drains into this big vat
  • verb leave suddenly and as if in a hurry
    bolt out; bolt; run off; beetle off.
    • The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas
    • When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out
  • verb lose validity
    expire.
    • My passports expired last month
  • verb flow, run or fall out and become lost
    spill.
    • The milk spilled across the floor
    • The wine spilled onto the table
  • verb exhaust the supply of
    • We ran out of time just as the discussion was getting interesting
  • verb prove insufficient
    fail; give out.
    • The water supply for the town failed after a long drought
  • verb use up all one's strength and energy and stop working
    peter out; poop out; run down; conk out.
    • At the end of the march, I pooped out
WordNet

rush out

  • verb jump out from a hiding place and surprise (someone)
    rush out; leap out; burst forth.
    • The attackers leapt out from the bushes
WordNet

sack out

  • verb prepare for sleep
    retire; hit the sack; bed; kip down; turn in; go to bed; go to sleep; crawl in; hit the hay.
    • I usually turn in at midnight
    • He goes to bed at the crack of dawn
WordNet

sally out

  • verb set out in a sudden, energetic or violent manner
    sally forth.
  • verb jump out from a hiding place and surprise (someone)
    rush out; leap out; burst forth.
    • The attackers leapt out from the bushes
WordNet

scarf out

  • verb overeat or eat immodestly; make a pig of oneself
    engorge; gormandize; gormandise; overgorge; glut; overeat; satiate; englut; stuff; ingurgitate; overindulge; gorge; gourmandize; binge; pig out.
    • She stuffed herself at the dinner
    • The kids binged on ice cream
WordNet

scent out

  • verb recognize or detect by or as if by smelling
    nose out; scent out; smell out.
    • He can smell out trouble
WordNet

scoop out

  • verb hollow out with a scoop
    • scoop out a melon
  • verb take out or up with or as if with a scoop
    scoop; scoop up; lift out; take up.
    • scoop the sugar out of the container
WordNet

score out

  • verb remove by or as if by rubbing or erasing
    efface; wipe off; erase; rub out.
    • Please erase the formula on the blackboard--it is wrong!
WordNet

scratch out

  • verb strike or cancel by or as if by rubbing or crossing out
    cut out.
    • scratch out my name on that list
WordNet

screen out

  • verb examine in order to test suitability
    sort; screen; sieve.
    • screen these samples
    • screen the job applicants
WordNet

seek out

  • verb look for a specific person or thing
WordNet

sell out

  • verb get rid of all one's merchandise
    sell up; liquidize.
  • verb give information that compromises others
WordNet

send out

  • verb to cause or order to be taken, directed, or transmitted to another place
    send.
    • He had sent the dispatches downtown to the proper people and had slept
WordNet

separate out

  • verb remove by passing through a filter
    filter; filtrate; filter out; strain.
    • filter out the impurities
WordNet

set out

  • verb take the first step or steps in carrying out an action
    begin; get; set about; start; set out; get down; commence.
    • We began working at dawn
    • Who will start?
    • Get working as soon as the sun rises!
    • The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia
    • He began early in the day
    • Let's get down to work now
  • verb lay out orderly or logically in a line or as if in a line
    range; lay out; array.
    • lay out the clothes
    • lay out the arguments
  • verb leave
    depart; set forth; set off; start; part; set out; take off.
    • The family took off for Florida
WordNet

share-out

  • noun a distribution in shares
    sharing.
WordNet

shared out

  • adjective satellite distributed in portions (often equal) on the basis of a plan or purpose
    shared; divided; divided up.
WordNet

shell out

  • verb administer or bestow, as in small portions
    dish out; deal; parcel out; dispense; distribute; dole out; administer; allot; lot; deal out; mete out.
    • administer critical remarks to everyone present
    • dole out some money
    • shell out pocket money for the children
    • deal a blow to someone
    • the machine dispenses soft drinks
WordNet

shout out

  • verb utter a sudden loud cry
    cry; hollo; squall; shout; call; holler; yell; scream.
    • she cried with pain when the doctor inserted the needle
    • I yelled to her from the window but she couldn't hear me
  • verb utter in a very loud voice
    vociferate.
    • They vociferated their demands
WordNet

shut out

  • verb prevent from entering; shut out
    exclude; keep out; shut.
    • The trees were shutting out all sunlight
    • This policy excludes people who have a criminal record from entering the country
WordNet

sieve out

  • verb separate or remove
    pick over.
    • The customer picked over the selection
WordNet

single out

  • verb select from a group
    • She was singled out for her outstanding performance
  • verb treat differently on the basis of sex or race
    discriminate; separate.
WordNet

sit out

  • verb not participate in (an activity, such as a dance or a sports event)
    • He sat out the game
  • verb endure to the end
WordNet

sleep out

  • verb work in a house where one does not live; he can easily commute from his home"
    live out.
    • our cook lives out
WordNet

smell out

  • verb recognize or detect by or as if by smelling
    nose out; scent out; smell out.
    • He can smell out trouble
  • verb become aware of not through the senses but instinctively
    smell; sense.
    • I sense his hostility
    • i smell trouble
    • smell out corruption
WordNet

smoke out

  • verb drive out with smoke
    • smoke out the bees
WordNet

smooth out

  • verb free from obstructions
    smooth.
    • smooth the way towards peace negotiations
WordNet

sneak out

  • verb leave furtively and stealthily
    steal away; sneak away; slip away; sneak off.
    • The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard
WordNet

sniff out

  • verb recognize or detect by or as if by smelling
    nose out; scent out; smell out.
    • He can smell out trouble
WordNet

snuff out

  • verb put an end to; kill
    extinguish.
    • The Nazis snuffed out the life of many Jewish children
  • verb put out, as of fires, flames, or lights
    blow out; extinguish; quench.
    • Too big to be extinguished at once, the forest fires at best could be contained
    • quench the flames
    • snuff out the candles
WordNet

sold-out

  • adjective satellite having taken a bribe or bribes
    • a sold-out politician
  • adjective satellite sold completely in advance
    • had a sold-out house for both performances
WordNet

sort out

  • verb arrange or order by classes or categories
    sort; separate; assort; class; classify.
    • How would you classify these pottery shards--are they prehistoric?
  • verb make free from confusion or ambiguity; make clear
    crystallise; illuminate; elucidate; clear; clear up; crystallize; sort out; crystalise; shed light on; crystalize; enlighten.
    • Could you clarify these remarks?
    • Clear up the question of who is at fault
  • verb punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience
    discipline; correct.
    • The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently
WordNet

sound out

  • verb speak, pronounce, or utter in a certain way
    pronounce; enunciate; articulate; say; enounce.
    • She pronounces French words in a funny way
    • I cannot say `zip wire'
    • Can the child sound out this complicated word?
  • verb try to learn someone's opinions and intentions
    feel out; check out.
    • I have to sound out the new professor
WordNet

spaced-out

  • adjective satellite stupefied by (or as if by) some narcotic drug
    spacey; spacy.
  • adjective satellite confused or disoriented as if intoxicated through taking a drug
WordNet

speak out

  • verb express one's opinion openly and without fear or hesitation
    speak up; animadvert; opine; sound off.
    • John spoke up at the meeting
WordNet

spell out

  • verb make explicit; specify in detail
    • You should spell out your demands
  • verb spell fully and without abbreviating
    • Can you spell out your middle name instead of just giving the initial?
  • verb orally recite the letters of or give the spelling of
    spell.
    • How do you spell this word?" "We had to spell out our names for the police officer
WordNet

spew out

  • verb eject or send out in large quantities, also metaphorical
    spew; eruct.
    • the volcano spews out molten rocks every day
    • The editors of the paper spew out hostile articles about the Presidential candidate
WordNet

spike out

  • verb bring forth a spike or spikes
    spike.
    • my hyacinths and orchids are spiking now
WordNet

spill out

  • verb be disgorged
    spill over; pour out.
    • The crowds spilled out into the streets
WordNet

spin out

  • verb prolong or extend
    spin.
    • spin out a visit
WordNet

spit out

  • verb spit up in an explosive manner
    sputter; splutter.
  • verb utter with anger or contempt
    spit.
  • verb discharge (phlegm or sputum) from the lungs and out of the mouth
    cough out; expectorate; spit up; cough up.
WordNet

spread out

  • verb move outward
    fan out; spread; diffuse.
    • The soldiers fanned out
  • verb set out or stretch in a line, succession, or series
    spread out.
    • the houses were strung out in a long row
  • verb strew or distribute over an area
    spread; scatter.
    • He spread fertilizer over the lawn
    • scatter cards across the table
  • verb extend in one or more directions
    expand.
    • The dough expands
  • verb turn outward
    splay; rotate; spread out.
    • These birds can splay out their toes
    • ballet dancers can rotate their legs out by 90 degrees
  • verb move away from each other;
    scatter; disperse; dissipate.
    • The crowds dispersed
    • The children scattered in all directions when the teacher approached
  • verb spread out or open from a closed or folded state
    spread; open; unfold.
    • open the map
    • spread your arms
WordNet

spread-out

  • adjective satellite especially spread in a fan shape
    fanned.
    • the peacock's fanned tail
    • the spread-out cards
WordNet

squeeze out

  • verb force out
    • Some employees were squeezed out by the recent budget cuts
  • verb make by laborious and precarious means
    eke out.
    • He eked out a living as a painter
  • verb extract (liquid) by squeezing or pressing
    squeeze out.
    • wring out the washcloth
  • verb obtain with difficulty
    eke out.
    • He eked out some information from the archives
  • verb form or shape by forcing through an opening
    extrude.
    • extrude steel
  • verb cause to come out in a squirt
    force out; squirt; eject.
    • the boy squirted water at his little sister
WordNet

stamp out

  • verb end or extinguish by forceful means
    kill.
    • Stamp out poverty!
WordNet

stand out

  • verb be highly noticeable
    jump; jump out; leap out; stand out.
  • verb distinguish oneself
    excel; surpass.
    • She excelled in math
  • verb steer away from shore, of ships
  • verb be stubborn in resolution or resistance
WordNet

start out

  • verb take the first step or steps in carrying out an action
    begin; get; set about; start; set out; get down; commence.
    • We began working at dawn
    • Who will start?
    • Get working as soon as the sun rises!
    • The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia
    • He began early in the day
    • Let's get down to work now
  • verb leave
    depart; set forth; set off; start; part; set out; take off.
    • The family took off for Florida
WordNet

step out

  • verb go outside a room or building for a short period of time
WordNet

stick out

  • verb extend out or project in space
    project; protrude; jut out; jut.
    • His sharp nose jutted out
    • A single rock sticks out from the cliff
  • verb be highly noticeable
    jump; jump out; leap out; stand out.
  • verb put up with something or somebody unpleasant
    stomach; brook; support; put up; tolerate; bear; abide; endure; suffer; digest; stand.
    • I cannot bear his constant criticism
    • The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks
    • he learned to tolerate the heat
    • She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage
WordNet

sticking out

  • adjective satellite extending out above or beyond a surface or boundary
    sticking; jutting; protruding; relieved; projected; projecting.
    • the jutting limb of a tree
    • massive projected buttresses
    • his protruding ribs
    • a pile of boards sticking over the end of his truck
WordNet

stink out

  • verb cause to smell bad; fill with a bad smell
    stink up; smell up.
WordNet

stopping-out

Stop"ping-out` noun
Definitions
  1. A method adopted in etching, to keep the acid from those parts which are already sufficiently corroded, by applying varnish or other covering matter with a brush, but allowing the acid to act on the other parts.
Webster 1913

straight-out

  • adjective satellite without reservation or exception
    outright; unlimited.
WordNet
Straight"-out` adjective
Definitions
  1. Acting without concealment, obliquity, or compromise; hence, unqualified; thoroughgoing. Colloq. U.S.
    Straight-out and generous indignation. Mrs. Stowe.
Webster 1913

straighten out

  • verb settle or put right
    put right; iron out.
    • we need to iron out our disagreements
  • verb extricate from entanglement
    unsnarl; disentangle.
    • Can you disentangle the cord?
  • verb change for the better
    see the light; reform.
    • The lazy student promised to reform
    • the habitual cheater finally saw the light
  • verb make straight
    straighten.
  • verb make free from confusion or ambiguity; make clear
    crystallise; illuminate; elucidate; clear; clear up; crystallize; sort out; crystalise; shed light on; crystalize; enlighten.
    • Could you clarify these remarks?
    • Clear up the question of who is at fault
  • verb put (things or places) in order
    tidy up; tidy; straighten; clean up; square away; neaten.
    • Tidy up your room!
WordNet

Stretch out

  • verb extend or stretch out to a greater or the full length
    stretch; extend; unfold.
    • Unfold the newspaper
    • stretch out that piece of cloth
    • extend the TV antenna
  • verb lie down comfortably
    stretch.
    • To enjoy the picnic, we stretched out on the grass
  • verb thrust or extend out
    extend; exsert; stretch forth; hold out; put out.
    • He held out his hand
    • point a finger
    • extend a hand
    • the bee exserted its sting
  • verb extend one's body or limbs
    stretch.
    • Let's stretch for a minute--we've been sitting here for over 3 hours
  • verb stretch (the neck) so as to see better
    crane.
    • The women craned their necks to see the President drive by
WordNet
  • an order to rowers to extend themselves forward in dipping the oar.
Webster 1913

strike out

  • verb remove from a list
    mark; cross out; strike off; cross off.
    • Cross the name of the dead person off the list
  • verb put out or be put out by a strikeout
    • Oral struck out three batters to close the inning
  • verb be unsuccessful in an endeavor
    • The candidate struck out with his health care plan
  • verb make a motion as with one's fist or foot towards an object or away from one's body
  • verb cause to get out
    retire.
    • The pitcher retired three batters
    • the runner was put out at third base
  • verb set out on a course of action
    • He struck out on his own
WordNet

string out

  • verb set out or stretch in a line, succession, or series
    spread out.
    • the houses were strung out in a long row
WordNet

strung-out

  • adjective satellite addicted to a drug
    dependent; hooked; drug-addicted; dependant.
WordNet

stub out

  • verb extinguish by crushing
    extinguish; crush out; press out.
    • stub out your cigar
WordNet

suck out

  • verb remove as if by suction
    draw out; aspirate.
    • aspirate the wound
WordNet

suss out

  • verb examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
    check into; go over; check over; check up on; look into; check out; check.
    • check the brakes
    • Check out the engine
WordNet

swear out

  • verb deliver a warrant or summons to someone
    process; serve.
    • He was processed by the sheriff
WordNet

swing out

  • verb make a big sweeping gesture or movement
    sweep; swing.
WordNet

take out

  • verb cause to leave
    remove; move out.
    • The teacher took the children out of the classroom
  • verb remove from its packing
    unpack.
    • unpack the presents
  • verb take out or remove
    take away.
    • take out the chicken after adding the vegetables
  • verb obtain by legal or official process
    • take out a license
    • take out a patent
  • verb make a date
    invite out; ask out.
    • Has he asked you out yet?
  • verb remove something from a container or an enclosed space
  • verb purchase prepared food to be eaten at home
    buy food.
  • verb remove (a commodity) from (a supply source)
    draw; draw off; withdraw.
    • She drew $2,000 from the account
    • The doctors drew medical supplies from the hospital's emergency bank
  • verb bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover
    pull; draw; pull out; get out.
    • draw a weapon
    • pull out a gun
    • The mugger pulled a knife on his victim
  • verb take liquid out of a container or well
    draw.
    • She drew water from the barrel
  • verb remove, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense
    pull; pull out; pull up; draw out; extract.
    • pull weeds
    • extract a bad tooth
    • take out a splinter
    • extract information from the telegram
  • verb buy and consume food from a restaurant or establishment that sells prepared food
    take away.
    • We'll take out pizza, since I am too tired to cook
  • verb take out of a literary work in order to cite or copy
    extract; excerpt.
  • verb prevent from being included or considered or accepted
    omit; except; leave off; leave out; exclude.
    • The bad results were excluded from the report
    • Leave off the top piece
WordNet

talk out of

  • verb persuade someone not to do something
WordNet

tap out

  • verb beat out a rhythm
    beat out; tap out.
WordNet

thin out

  • verb make sparse
    • thin out the young plants
  • verb become sparser
    • Towards the end of town, the houses thinned out
  • verb lessen the strength or flavor of a solution or mixture
    cut; dilute; reduce; thin.
    • cut bourbon
WordNet

think out

  • verb consider carefully and rationally
    • Every detail has been thought out
WordNet

thrash out

  • verb discuss vehemently in order to reach a solution or an agreement
    hammer out.
    • The leaders of the various Middle Eastern countries are trying to hammer out a peace agreement
WordNet

throw out

  • verb force to leave or move out
    kick out; expel.
    • He was expelled from his native country
  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss away.
    • Put away your worries
  • verb remove from a position or office
    oust; expel; boot out; drum out; kick out.
    • The chairman was ousted after he misappropriated funds
  • verb bring forward for consideration or acceptance
    advance.
    • advance an argument
  • verb cease to consider; put out of judicial consideration
    dismiss.
    • This case is dismissed!
WordNet

throw out of kilter

  • verb throw into great confusion or disorder
    derange; perturb.
    • Fundamental Islamicists threaten to perturb the social order in Algeria and Egypt
WordNet

thrust out

  • verb push to thrust outward
    obtrude; push out.
WordNet

thump out

  • verb beat out a rhythm
    beat out; tap out.
WordNet

Time immemorial, ∨ Time out of mind

  • . (Eng. Law) See under Immemorial.
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time out

  • noun a pause from doing something (as work)
    break; recess; respite.
    • we took a 10-minute break
    • he took time out to recuperate
WordNet

time out of mind

  • noun the distant past beyond memory
    time immemorial.
WordNet

time-out

  • noun a brief suspension of play
    • each team has two time-outs left
WordNet

tire out

  • verb exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress
    tire; wear down; jade; fag out; weary; fatigue; wear; tire out; outwear; fag; wear upon.
    • We wore ourselves out on this hike
WordNet

To back out, To back down

  • to retreat or withdraw from a promise, engagement, or contest; to recede. Colloq.
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To be burned out

  • to suffer loss by fire, as the burning of one's house, store, or shop, with the contents.
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To be out at the heels

  • to have on stockings that are worn out; hence, to be shabby, or in a poor plight. Shak.
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To be out of her reckoning

  • to be at a distance from the place indicated by the reckoning; said of a ship.
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To be out of one's head

  • to be temporarily insane.
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To bear out

  • . (a) To maintain and support to the end; to defend to the last. "Company only can bear a man out in an ill thing." South. (b) To corroborate; to confirm.
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To beat out

  • to extend by hammering.
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To beat out of

  • a thing, to cause to relinquish it, or give it up. "Nor can anything beat their posterity out of it to this day." South.
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To block out

  • to begin to reduce to shape; to mark out roughly; to lay out; as, to block out a plan.
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To blow out

  • . (a) To be driven out by the expansive force of a gas or vapor; as, a steam cock or valve sometimes blows out. (b) To talk violently or abusively. Low
  • to extinguish by a current of air, as a candle.
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To bowl (a player) out

  • in cricket, to put out a striker by knocking down a bail or a stump in bowling.
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To branch out

  • to speak diffusively; to extend one's discourse to other topics than the main one; also, to enlarge the scope of one's business, etc.
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To break out

  • to take or force out by breaking; as, to break out a pane of glass .
  • . (a) To burst forth; to escape from restraint; to appear suddenly, as a fire or an epidemic. "For in the wilderness shall waters break out, and stream in the desert." Isa. xxxv. 6 (b) To show itself in cutaneous eruptions; said of a disease. (c) To have a rash or eruption on the akin; said of a patient.
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To break out a cargo

  • to unstow a cargo, so as to unload it easily.
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To bring out

  • to expose; to detect; to bring to light from concealment.
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To burn out

  • to destroy or obliterate by burning. "Must you with hot irons burn out mine eyes?" Shak.
  • to burn till the fuel is exhausted.
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To buy out

  • (a) To buy off, or detach from. Shak. (b) To purchase the share or shares of in a stock, fund, or partnership, by which the seller is separated from the company, and the purchaser takes his place; as, A buys out B. (c) To purchase the entire stock in trade and the good will of a business.
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To call out

  • . (a) To summon to fight; to challenge. (b) To summon into service; as, to call out the militia.
  • To call or utter loudly; to brawl.
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To carry out

  • . (a) To bear from within. (b) To put into execution; to bring to a successful issue. (c) To sustain to the end; to continue to the end.
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To carve out

  • to make or get by cutting, or as if by cutting; to cut out. "[Macbeth] with his brandished steel . . . carved out his passage."
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To cast out

  • to throy out; to eject, as from a house; to cast forth; to expel; to utter.
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To chalk out

  • to sketch with, or as with, chalk; to outline; to indicate; to plan. Colloq. "I shall pursue the plan I have chalked out."
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To clean out

  • to exhaust; to empty; to get away from (one) all his money. Colloq.
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To come out

  • . (a) To pass out or depart, as from a country, room, company, etc. "They shall come out with great substance." Gen. xv. 14. (b) To become public; to appear; to be published. "It is indeed come out at last." Bp. Stillingfleet. (c) To end; to result; to turn out; as, how will this affair come out? he has come out well at last. (d) To be introduced into society; as, she came out two seasons ago. (e) To appear; to show itself; as, the sun came out. (f) To take sides; to take a stand; as, he came out against the tariff. (g) To publicly admit oneself to be homosexual.
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To come out, To cut out, To fall out

  • etc. See under Come, Cut, Fall, etc.
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To come out with

  • to give publicity to; to disclose.
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To corbel out

  • to furnish with a corbel of courses, each projecting beyond the one next below it.
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To count out

  • . (a) To exclude (one) will not particapate or cannot be depended upon. (b) (House of Commons) To declare adjourned, as a sitting of the House, when it is ascertained that a quorum is not present. (c) To prevent the accession of (a person) to office, by a fraudulent return or count of the votes cast; said of a candidate really elected. Colloq.
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To crop out

  • . (a) (Geol.) To appear above the surface, as a seam or vein, or inclined bed, as of coal. (b) To come to light; to be manifest; to appear; as, the peculiarities of an author crop out.
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To crowd out

  • to press out; specifically, to prevent the publication of; as, the press of other matter crowded out the article.
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To crush out

  • . (a) To force out or separate by pressure, as juice from grapes. (b) To overcome or destroy completely; to suppress.
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To cry out

  • . (a) To exclaim; to vociferate; to scream; to clamor. (b) To complain loudly; to lament.
  • to proclaim; to shout."Your gesture cries it out." Shak.
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To cry out against

  • to complain loudly of; to censure; to blame.
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To cry out onupon

  • to denounce; to censure. "Cries out upon abuses." Shak.
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To cut out

  • . (a) To remove by cutting or carving; as, to cut out a piece from a board. (b) To shape or form by cutting; as, to cut out a garment. " A large forest cut out into walks." Addison. (c) To scheme; to contrive; to prepare; as, to cut out work for another day. "Every man had cut out a place for himself." Addison. (d) To step in and take the place of; to supplant; as, to cut out a rival. Colloq. (e) To debar. "I am cut out from anything but common acknowledgments." Pope. (f) To seize and carry off (a vessel) from a harbor, or from under the guns of an enemy.
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To dam out

  • to keep out by means of a dam.
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To die out

  • to cease gradually; as, the prejudice has died out.
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To dig from, out of, out, ∨ up

  • to get out or obtain by digging; as, to dig coal from or out of a mine; to dig out fossils; to dig up a tree. The preposition is often omitted; as, the men are digging coal, digging iron ore, digging potatoes.
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To dish out

  • . #1 To serve out of a dish; to distribute in portions at table. #2 (Arch.) To hollow out, as a gutter in stone or wood.
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To draw (one) out

  • to elicit cunningly the thoughts and feelings of another.
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To draw out

  • to stretch or extend; to protract; to spread out. "Wilt thou draw out thine anger to all generations?" Ps. lxxxv. 5. "Linked sweetness long drawn out." Milton.
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To dream away, out, through

  • etc., to pass in revery or inaction; to spend in idle vagaries; as, to dream away an hour; to dream through life. " Why does Antony dream out his hours?"
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To dress upout

  • to dress elaborately, artificially, or pompously. "You see very often a king of England or France dressed up like a Julius Cæsar." Addison.
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To dub out

  • (Plastering), to fill out, as an uneven surface, to a plane, or to carry out a series of small projections.
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To eat out

  • to consume completely. "Eat out the heart and comfort of it." Tillotson.
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To eat the wind out of a vessel

  • (Naut.), to gain slowly to windward of her.
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To face (a thing) out

  • to persist boldly or impudently in an assertion or in a line of conduct. "That thinks with oaths to face the matter out." Shak
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To fag out

  • to become untwisted or frayed, as the end of a rope, or the edge of canvas.
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To fall out

  • . (a) To quarrel; to begin to contend.
    A soul exasperated in ills falls outWith everything, its friend, itself.Addison.
    (b) To happen; to befall; to chance. "There fell out a bloody quarrel betwixt the frogs and the mice." L'Estrange. (c) (Mil.) To leave the ranks, as a soldier.
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To fetch out

  • to develop. "The skill of the polisher fetches out the colors [of marble]" Addison.
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To fight it out

  • to fight until a decisive and conclusive result is reached.
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To figure out

  • to solve; to compute or find the result of.
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To fill out

  • to extend or enlarge to the desired limit; to make complete; as, to fill out a bill.
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To find out

  • to detect (a thief); to discover (a secret) to solve or unriddle (a parable or enigma); to understand. "Canst thou by searching find out God?" Job. xi. 7. "We do hope to find out all your tricks." Milton.
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To find the latchstring out

  • to meet with hospitality; to be welcome. (Intrusion is prevented by drawing in the latchstring.) Colloq. U.S.
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To fit out

  • to supply with necessaries or means; to furnish; to equip; as, to fit out a privateer.
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To fizzle out

  • to burn with a hissing noise and then go out, like wet gunpowder; hence, to fail completely and ridicuously; to prove a failure. Colloq.
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To flat out

  • to fail from a promising beginning; to make a bad ending; to disappoint expectations. Colloq.
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To fling out

  • to utter; to speak in an abrupt or harsh manner; as, to fling out hard words against another.
  • to become ugly and intractable; to utter sneers and insinuations.
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To fly out

  • . (a) To rush out. (b) To burst into a passion; to break out into license.
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To fork over ∨ out

  • to hand or pay over, as money. Slang
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To funk out

  • to back out in a cowardly fashion. Colloq.
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To give out

  • . (a) To utter publicly; to report; to announce or declare.
    One that gives out himself Prince Florizel.
    Shak.
    Give out you are of Epidamnum. Shak.
    (b) To send out; to emit; to distribute; as, a substance gives out steam or odors.
  • . (a) To expend all one's strength. Hence: (b) To cease from exertion; to fail; to be exhausted; as, my feet being to give out; the flour has given out.
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To go in and out

  • to do the business of life; to live; to have free access. John x. 9.
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To go out

  • . (a) To issue forth from a place. (b) To go abroad; to make an excursion or expedition.
    There are other men fitter to go out than I. Shak.
    What went ye out for to see ? Matt. xi. 7, 8, 9.
    (c) To become diffused, divulged, or spread abroad, as news, fame etc. (d) To expire; to die; to cease; to come to an end; as, the light has gone out.
    Life itself goes out at thy displeasure. Addison.
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To grow out of

  • to issue from, as plants from the soil, or as a branch from the main stem; to result from.
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To hang out

  • . (a) To be hung out so as to be displayed; to project. (b) To be unyielding; as, the juryman hangs out against an agreement. Colloq. (c) to lounge around a particular place; as, teenageers tend to hang out at the mall these days
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To hang out the white flag

  • to ask truce or quarter, or, in some cases, to manifest a friendly design by exhibiting a white flag.
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To have (a man) out

  • to engage (one) in a duel.
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To have it out

  • to speak freely; to bring an affair to a conclusion.
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To hearken out

  • to search out. Obs.
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To heave out a sail

  • (Naut.), to unfurl it.
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To help out

  • to aid, as in delivering from a difficulty, or to aid in completing a design or task.
    The god of learning and of light Would want a god himself to help him out. Swift.
  • to lend aid; to bring a supply.
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To hem out

  • to shut out. "You can not hem me out of London." J. Webster.
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To hit out

  • to perform by good luck. Obs. Spenser.
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To hold out

  • . (a) To extend; to offer. "Fortune holds out these to you as rewards." B. Jonson. (b) To continue to do or to suffer; to endure. "He can not long hold out these pangs." Shak.
  • to last; to endure; to continue; to maintain one's self; not to yield or give way.
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To knock out

  • , to force out by a blow or by blows; as, to knock out the brains.
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To lash out

  • to strike out wildly or furiously.
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To laugh one out of

  • to cause one by laughter or ridicule to abandon or give up; as, to laugh one out of a plan or purpose.
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To laugh out

  • to laugh in spite of some restraining influence; to laugh aloud.
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To laugh out of the other corner (∨ side) of the mouth

  • to weep or cry; to feel regret, vexation, or disappointment after hilarity or exaltation. Slang
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To lay one's self out

  • to strive earnestly.
    No selfish man will be concerned to lay out himself for the good of his country. Smalridge.
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To lay out

  • . (a) To expend. Macaulay. (b) To display; to discover . (c) To plan in detail; to arrange; as, to lay out a garden . (d) To prepare for burial; as, to lay out a corpse . (e) To exert; as, to lay out all one's strength.
  • to purpose; to plan; as, he lays out to make a journey.
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To lead off ∨ out

  • to go first; to begin.
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To leak out

  • to be divulged gradually or clandestinely; to become public; as, the facts leaked out.
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To leave one out in the cold

  • to overlook or neglect him. Colloq.
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To leave out

  • to omit; as, to leave out a word or name in writing.
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To let out

  • . (a) To allow to go forth; as, to let out a prisoner . (b) To extend or loosen, as the folds of a garment; to enlarge; to suffer to run out, as a cord . (c) To lease; to give out for performance by contract, as a job . (d) To divulge.
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To let the cat out of the bag

  • to tell a secret, carelessly or willfully. Colloq.
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To live out

  • to be at service; to live away from home as a servant. U. S.
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To look out

  • to seek for; as, prudent persons look out associates good reputation.
  • to be on the watch; to be careful; as, the seaman looks out for breakers.
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To make an out

  • (Print.), to omit something, in setting or correcting type, which was in the copy.
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To make out

  • to succeed; to be able at last; to make shift; as, he made out to reconcile the contending parties.
  • . (a) To find out; to discover; to decipher; as, to make out the meaning of a letter. (b) To prove; to establish; as, the plaintiff was unable to make out his case . (c) To make complete or exact; as, he was not able to make out the money.
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To mark out

  • . (a) To designate, as by a mark; to select; as, the ringleaders were marked out for punishment . (b) To obliterate or cancel with a mark; as, to mark out an item in an account.
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To muster troops out of service

  • (Mil.), to register them for final payment and discharge.
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To pay out

  • (Naut.), to pass out; hence, to slacken; to allow to run out; as, to pay out more cable. See under Cable.
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To pay out the cable, To veer out the cable

  • to slacken it, that it may run out of the ship; to let more cable run out of the hawse hole.
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To pick out

  • . (a) To mark out; to variegate; as, to pick out any dark stuff with lines or spots of bright colors . (b) To select from a number or quantity.
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To put one out conceit with

  • to make one indifferent to a thing, or in a degree displeased with it.
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To put a vessel out of commission

  • (Naut.), to detach the officers and crew and retire it from active service, temporarily or permanently.
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To put one's nose out of joint

  • to humiliate one's pride, esp. by supplanting one in the affections of another. Slang
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To put out

  • . (a) To eject; as, to put out and intruder. (b) To put forth; to shoot, as a bud, or sprout . (c) To extinguish; as, to put out a candle, light, or fire . (d) To place at interest; to loan; as, to put out funds . (e) To provoke, as by insult; to displease; to vex; as, he was put out by my reply . Colloq. (f) To protrude; to stretch forth; as, to put out the hand. (g) To publish; to make public; as, to put out a pamphlet . (h) To confuse; to disconcert; to interrupt; as, to put one out in reading or speaking . (i) (Law) To open; as, to put out lights, that is, to open or cut windows . Burrill. (j) (Med.) To place out of joint; to dislocate; as, to put out the ankle. (k) To cause to cease playing, or to prevent from playing longer in a certain inning, as in base ball .
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To put out of court

  • to refuse further judicial hearing.
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To put out of the way

  • to kill; to destroy.
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To put to grass, To put out to grass

  • to put out to graze a season, as cattle.
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To put to nurse, ∨ To put out to nurse

  • to send away to be nursed; to place in the care of a nurse.
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To rake out

  • (Falconry), to fly too far and wide from its master while hovering above waiting till the game is sprung; said of the hawk.
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To rap out

  • to utter with sudden violence, as an oath.
    A judge who rapped out a great oath. Addison.
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To ride out

  • . (a) To go upon a military expedition. Obs. Chaucer. (b) To ride in the open air. Colloq.
  • (Naut.), to keep safe afloat during (a storm) while riding at anchor or when hove to on the open sea; as, to ride out the gale.
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To ring inout

  • to usher, attend on, or celebrate, by the ringing of bells; as, to ring out the old year and ring in the new. Tennyson.
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To rip out

  • to rap out, to utter hastily and violently; as, to rip out an oath. Colloq. See To rap out, under Rap, v. t.
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To rout out

  • (a) To turn up to view, as if by rooting; to discover; to find . (b) To turn out by force or compulsion; as, to rout people out of bed. Colloq.
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To rub out

  • to remove or separate by friction; to erase; to obliterate; as, to rub out a mark or letter; to rub out a stain.
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To run out

  • . (a) To come to an end; to expire; as, the lease runs out Michaelmas. (b) To extend; to spread . "Insectile animals . . . run all out into legs." Hammond. (c) To expatiate; as, to run out into beautiful digressions. (d) To be wasted or exhausted; to become poor; to become extinct; as, an estate managed without economy will soon run out.
    And had her stock been less, no doubt She must have long ago run out. Dryden.
  • . (a) To thrust or push out; to extend. (b) To waste; to exhaust; as, to run out an estate . (c) (Baseball) To put out while running between two bases.
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To screw out

  • to press out; to extort.
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To search out

  • to seek till found; to find by seeking; as, to search out truth.
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To see (anything) out

  • to see (it) to the end; to be present at, or attend, to the end.
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To sell (anything) out

  • to dispose of it wholly or entirely; as, he had sold out his corn, or his interest in a business.
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To sell out

  • to sell one's whole stockk in trade or one's entire interest in a property or a business.
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To serve one out

  • to retaliate upon; to requite. "I'll serve you out for this." C. Kingsley.
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To serve out

  • to distribute; as, to serve out rations.
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To set out

  • . (a) To assign; to allot; to mark off; to limit; as, to set out the share of each proprietor or heir of an estate; to set out the widow's thirds. (b) To publish, as a proclamation . Obs. (c) To adorn; to embellish.
    An ugly woman, in rich habit set out with jewels, nothing can become. Dryden.
    (d) To raise, equip, and send forth; to furnish. R.
    The Venetians pretend they could set out, in case of great necessity, thirty men-of-war. Addison.
    (e) To show; to display; to recommend; to set off.
    I could set out that best side of Luther. Atterbury.
    (f) To show; to prove. R. "Those very reasons set out how heinous his sin was." Atterbury. (g) (Law) To recite; to state at large.
  • to begin a journey or course; as, to set out for London, or from London; to set out in business;to set out in life or the world.
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To shake out a reef

  • (Naut.), to untile the reef points and spread more canvas.
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To shell out

  • to distribute freely; to bring out or pay, as money. Colloq.
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To shoot out the lip

  • (Script.), to show contempt by protruding the lip.
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To shut out

  • to preclude from entering; to deny admission to; to exclude; as, to shut out rain by a tight roof.
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To sift out

  • to search out with care, as if by sifting.
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To sit out

  • . (a) To be without engagement or employment . Obs. Bp. Sanderson. (b) To outstay.
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To smell out

  • to find out by sagacity. Colloq.
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To smite out

  • to knock out, as a tooth. Exod,xxi.27.
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To snuff out

  • to extinguish by snuffing.
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To speak out

  • to speak loudly and distinctly; also, to speak unreservedly.
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To stamp out

  • to put an end to by sudden and energetic action; to extinguish; as, to stamp out a rebellion.
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To stand out

  • . (a) To project; to be prominent . "Their eyes stand out with fatness." Psalm lxxiii. 7. (b) To persist in opposition or resistance; not to yield or comply; not to give way or recede.
    His spirit is come in, That so stood out against the holy church. Shak.
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To step out

  • . (a) (Mil.) To increase the length, but not the rapidity, of the step, extending it to thirty-tree inches. (b) To go out for a short distance or a short time .
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To stick out

  • to cause to project or protrude; to render prominent.
  • . (a) To project; to be prominent. "His bones that were not seen stick out." Job xxxiii. 21. (b) To persevere in a purpose; to hold out; as, the garrison stuck out until relieved. Colloq. also v.i. to stick it out.
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To strike out

  • . (a) To start; to wander; to make a sudden excursion; as, to strike out into an irregular course of life . (b) To strike with full force . (c) (Baseball) To be put out for not hitting the ball during one's turn at the bat.
  • . (a) To produce by collision; to force out, as, to strike out sparks with steel. (b) To blot out; to efface; to erase . "To methodize is as necessary as to strike out." Pope. (c) To form by a quick effort; to devise; to invent; to contrive, as, to strike out a new plan of finance. (d) (Baseball) To cause a player to strike out; said of the pitcher . See To strike out, under Strike, v. i.
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To suck out

  • to draw out with the mouth; to empty by suction.
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To sue out

  • (Law), to petition for and take out, or to apply for and obtain; as, to sue out a writ in chancery; to sue out a pardon for a criminal.
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To take out

  • . (a) To remove from within a place; to separate; to deduct. (b) To draw out; to remove; to clear or cleanse from; as, to take out a stain or spot from cloth . (c) To produce for one's self; as, to take out a patent . (d) To put an end to; as, to take the conceit out of a man . (e) To escort; as, to take out to dinner. usu. paying the expenses
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To take the wind out of one's sails

  • to cause one to stop, or lose way, as when a vessel intercepts the wind of another. Colloq.
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To tear out

  • to pull or draw out by violence; as, to tear out the eyes.
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To throw in, ∨ out of, gear

  • (Mach.), to connect or disconnect (wheelwork or couplings, etc.); to put in, or out of, working relation.
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To throw out

  • . (a) To cast out; to reject or discard; to expel. "The other two, whom they had thrown out, they were content should enjoy their exile." Swift. "The bill was thrown out." Swift. (b) To utter; to give utterance to; to speak; as, to throw out insinuation or observation. "She throws out thrilling shrieks." Spenser. (c) To distance; to leave behind. Addison. (d) To cause to project; as, to throw out a pier or an abutment. (e) To give forth; to emit; as, an electric lamp throws out a brilliant light. (f) To put out; to confuse; as, a sudden question often throws out an orator.
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To thrust out

  • to drive out or away; to expel.
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To tire out

  • to weary or fatigue to exhaustion; to harass.
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To toe out

  • to have the toes of each foot, in standing or walking, incline from the other foot.
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To tread out

  • to press out with the feet; to press out, as wine or wheat; as, to tread out grain with cattle or horses.
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To trot out

  • to lead or bring out, as a horse, to show his paces; hence, to bring forward, as for exhibition. Slang.
Webster 1913

To turn out

  • . (a) To move from its place, as a bone. (b) To bend or point outward; as, his toes turn out. (c) To rise from bed. Colloq. (d) To come abroad; to appear; as, not many turned out to the fire. (e) To prove in the result; to issue; to result; as, the cropsturned out poorly.
  • . (a) To drive out; to expel; as, to turn a family out of doors; to turn a man out of office.
    I'll turn you out of my kingdom. Shak.
    (b) to put to pasture, as cattle or horses. (c) To produce, as the result of labor, or any process of manufacture; to furnish in a completed state. (d) To reverse, as a pocket, bag, etc., so as to bring the inside to the outside; hence, to produce. (e) To cause to cease, or to put out, by turning a stopcock, valve, or the like; as, to turn out the lights.
Webster 1913

To veer awayout

  • (Naut.), to let out; to slacken and let run; to pay out; as, to veer away the cable; to veer out a rope.
Webster 1913

To wear out

  • . (a) To consume, or render useless, by attrition or decay; as, to wear out a coat or a book. (b) To consume tediously. "To wear out miserable days." Milton. (c) To harass; to tire. "[He] shall wear out the saints of the Most High." Dan vii. 25. (d) To waste the strength of; as, an old man worn out in military service.
Webster 1913

To weary out

  • to subdue or exhaust by fatigue.
Webster 1913

To weather out

  • to encounter successfully, though with difficulty; as, to weather out a storm.
Webster 1913

To wind out

  • to extricate. Obs. Clarendon.
Webster 1913

To work out

  • . (a) To effect by labor and exertion. "Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling." Phil. ii. 12. (b) To erase; to efface. R.
    Tears of joy for your returning spilt, Work out and expiate our former guilt. Dryden.
    (c) To solve, as a problem. (d) To exhaust, as a mine, by working.
Webster 1913

tog out

  • verb put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    rig out; dress up; fig out; overdress; trick up; deck out; prink; tog out; get up; fig up; deck up; fancy up; attire; tog up; gussy up.
    • She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera
    • The young girls were all fancied up for the party
WordNet

top out

  • verb give up one's career just as one becomes very successful
    • The financial consultant topped out at age 40 because he was burned out
  • verb provide with a top or finish the top (of a structure)
    top.
    • the towers were topped with conical roofs
  • verb to reach the highest point; attain maximum intensity, activity
    peak.
    • That wild, speculative spirit peaked in 1929
    • Bids for the painting topped out at $50 million
WordNet

toss out

  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss away.
    • Put away your worries
WordNet

trick out

  • verb put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    rig out; dress up; fig out; overdress; trick up; deck out; prink; tog out; get up; fig up; deck up; fancy up; attire; tog up; gussy up.
    • She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera
    • The young girls were all fancied up for the party
WordNet

tricked-out

  • adjective satellite decorated in a particular way
    • tricked-out cupboards looking like Georgian cabinets
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trip out

  • verb get high, stoned, or drugged
    turn on; trip; get off.
    • He trips every weekend
WordNet

trot out

  • verb bring out and show for inspection and admiration
    • His novel trots out a rich heiress
    • always able to trot out some new excuse
WordNet

trump out

  • verb proclaim or announce with or as if with a fanfare
    trump.
WordNet

try out

  • verb put to the test, as for its quality, or give experimental use to
    essay; prove; try; examine; test.
    • This approach has been tried with good results
    • Test this recipe
  • verb try something new, as in order to gain experience
    experiment.
    • Students experiment sexually
    • The composer experimented with a new style
  • verb perform in order to get a role
    audition.
    • She auditioned for a role on Broadway
  • verb take a sample of
    sample; try; taste.
    • Try these new crackers
    • Sample the regional dishes
WordNet

tucker out

  • verb wear out completely
    wash up; exhaust; tucker; beat.
    • This kind of work exhausts me
    • I'm beat
    • He was all washed up after the exam
WordNet

turf out

  • verb put out or expel from a place
    eject; chuck out; turf out; boot out; exclude.
    • The unruly student was excluded from the game
WordNet

turn out

  • verb be shown or be found to be
    turn up; prove.
    • She proved to be right
    • The medicine turned out to save her life
    • She turned up HIV positive
  • verb prove to be in the result or end
    • It turns out that he was right
  • verb produce quickly or regularly, usually with machinery
    • This factory turns out saws
  • verb result or end
    come out.
    • How will the game turn out?
  • verb come, usually in answer to an invitation or summons
    • How many people turned out that evening?
  • verb bring forth, "The apple tree bore delicious apples this year"
    bear.
    • The unidentified plant bore gorgeous flowers
  • verb put out or expel from a place
    eject; chuck out; turf out; boot out; exclude.
    • The unruly student was excluded from the game
  • verb come and gather for a public event
    • Hundreds of thousands turned out for the anti-war rally in New York
  • verb outfit or equip, as with accessories
    • The actors were turned out lavishly
  • verb turn outward
    splay; rotate; spread out.
    • These birds can splay out their toes
    • ballet dancers can rotate their legs out by 90 degrees
  • verb cause to stop operating by disengaging a switch
    switch off; cut; turn off.
    • Turn off the stereo, please
    • cut the engine
    • turn out the lights
  • verb get up and out of bed
    get up; rise; uprise; arise.
    • I get up at 7 A.M. every day
    • They rose early
    • He uprose at night
WordNet

turn-out

Turn"-out` noun
Wordforms
plural Turn-outs
Definitions
  1. The act of coming forth; a leaving of houses, shops, etc.; esp., a quitting of employment for the purpose of forcing increase of wages; a strike; -- opposed to lockout.
  2. A short side track on a railroad, which may be occupied by one train while another is passing on a main track; a shunt; a siding; a switch.
  3. That which is prominently brought forward or exhibited; hence, an equipage; as, a man with a showy carriage and horses is said to have a fine turn-out.
  4. The aggregate number of persons who have come out, as from their houses, for a special purpose.
  5. Net quantity of produce yielded. 6. A space alongside a highway where vehicles may stop, esp. for emergency purposes, or to admire the view.
Webster 1913

turned out

  • adjective satellite dressed well or smartly
    • the girls were well turned out and smart
WordNet

usher out

  • verb end one's encounter with somebody by causing or permitting the person to leave
    dismiss.
    • I was dismissed after I gave my report
WordNet

vege out

  • verb engage in passive relaxation
    vegetate.
    • After a hard day's work, I vegetate in front of the television
WordNet

vote out

  • verb thwart the passage of
    vote down; kill; shoot down; defeat.
    • kill a motion
    • he shot down the student's proposal
WordNet

walk out

  • verb stop work in order to press demands
    strike.
    • The auto workers are striking for higher wages
    • The employees walked out when their demand for better benefits was not met
  • verb leave abruptly, often in protest or anger
    • The customer that was not served walked out
  • verb leave suddenly, often as an expression of disapproval
    • She walked out on her husband and children
WordNet

walk out of

  • verb leave, usually as an expression of disapproval
WordNet

wash out

  • verb prevent or interrupt due to rain
    rain out.
    • The storm had washed out the game
  • verb wash free from unwanted substances, such as dirt
    • Wash out your dirty shirt in the sink
  • verb wear or destroy by the force of water
    • The hail storms had washed out the bridges
  • verb remove by the application of water or other liquid and soap or some other cleaning agent
    wash; wash away; wash off.
    • he washed the dirt from his coat
    • The nurse washed away the blood
    • Can you wash away the spots on the windows?
    • he managed to wash out the stains
  • verb deplete of strength or vitality
    • The illness washed her out
  • verb drain off the color in the course of laundering
    • The harsh soap washed out the delicate blouse
  • verb lose color in the process of being washed
    • The expensive shirt washed out in the German washing machine
WordNet

washed-out

  • adjective satellite drained of energy or effectiveness; extremely tired; completely exhausted
    exhausted; spent; dog-tired; worn out; played out; fagged; fatigued; washed-out.
    • the day's shopping left her exhausted
    • he went to bed dog-tired
    • was fagged and sweaty
    • the trembling of his played out limbs
    • felt completely washed-out
    • only worn-out horses and cattle
    • you look worn out
  • adjective satellite having lost freshness or brilliance of color
    washy; bleached; faded.
    • sun-bleached deck chairs
    • faded jeans
    • a very pale washed-out blue
    • washy colors
WordNet

watch out

  • verb be vigilant, be on the lookout or be careful
    look out; watch.
    • Watch out for pickpockets!
WordNet

way out

  • noun an opening that permits escape or release
    issue; exit; outlet.
    • he blocked the way out
    • the canyon had only one issue
WordNet

way-out

  • adjective satellite informal terms; strikingly unconventional
    offbeat; quirky; kinky; far-out.
WordNet

wear out

  • verb exhaust or get tired through overuse or great strain or stress
    tire; wear down; jade; fag out; weary; fatigue; wear; tire out; outwear; fag; wear upon.
    • We wore ourselves out on this hike
  • verb go to pieces
    break; fall apart; wear; bust.
    • The lawn mower finally broke
    • The gears wore out
    • The old chair finally fell apart completely
  • verb deteriorate through use or stress
    wear down; wear off; wear thin; wear.
    • The constant friction wore out the cloth
WordNet

weed out

  • verb remove unwanted elements
    comb out.
    • The company weeded out the incompetent people
    • The new law weeds out the old inequities
WordNet

Week in, week out

  • . See Day in, day out (above).
Webster 1913

well out

  • verb flow freely and abundantly
    stream.
    • Tears streamed down her face
WordNet

well thought out

  • adjective satellite resulting from careful thought
    • the paper was well thought out
WordNet

white out

  • verb cover up with a liquid correction fluid
    whiteout.
    • white-out the typo
  • verb widen the interlinear spacing by inserting leads
WordNet

white-out

  • verb lose daylight visibility in heavy fog, snow, or rain
    whiteout.
WordNet

winkle out

  • verb force from a place or position
    • The committee winkled out the unqualified candidates
  • verb remove or displace from a position
    winkle.
WordNet

winnow out

  • verb dismiss from consideration or a contest
    reject; eliminate; rule out.
    • John was ruled out as a possible suspect because he had a strong alibi
    • This possibility can be eliminated from our consideration
WordNet

wipe out

  • verb use up (resources or materials)
    exhaust; consume; deplete; use up; eat up; eat; run through.
    • this car consumes a lot of gas
    • We exhausted our savings
    • They run through 20 bottles of wine a week
  • verb kill in large numbers
    annihilate; carry off; decimate; eliminate; extinguish; eradicate.
    • the plague wiped out an entire population
  • verb eliminate completely and without a trace
    sweep away.
    • The old values have been wiped out
  • verb remove from memory or existence
    erase.
    • The Turks erased the Armenians in 1915
  • verb mark for deletion, rub off, or erase
    obliterate; kill.
    • kill these lines in the President's speech
  • verb wipe out the effect of something
    cancel out.
    • The new tax effectively cancels out my raise
    • The `A' will cancel out the `C' on your record
WordNet

wiped out

  • adjective satellite destroyed completely
    annihilated; exterminated.
  • adjective satellite destroyed financially
    broken; impoverished.
    • the broken fortunes of the family
WordNet

work out

  • verb come up with
    work up.
    • His colleagues worked out his interesting idea
    • We worked up an ad for our client
  • verb happen in a certain way, leading to, producing, or resulting in a certain outcome, often well
    • Things worked out in an interesting way
    • Not everything worked out in the end and we were disappointed
  • verb work out in detail
    elaborate.
    • elaborate a plan
  • verb do physical exercise
    exercise.
    • She works out in the gym every day
  • verb be calculated
    • The fees work out to less than $1,000
  • verb make a mathematical calculation or computation
    cypher; compute; calculate; reckon; cipher; figure.
  • verb find the solution to (a problem or question) or understand the meaning of
    lick; work; puzzle out; solve; figure out.
    • did you solve the problem?
    • Work out your problems with the boss
    • this unpleasant situation isn't going to work itself out
    • did you get it?
    • Did you get my meaning?
    • He could not work the math problem
  • verb give a workout to
    work; exercise.
    • Some parents exercise their infants
    • My personal trainer works me hard
    • work one's muscles
    • this puzzle will exercise your mind
WordNet

working out

  • noun developing in intricate and painstaking detail
    elaboration.
WordNet

worn out

  • adjective satellite drained of energy or effectiveness; extremely tired; completely exhausted
    exhausted; spent; dog-tired; worn out; played out; fagged; fatigued; washed-out.
    • the day's shopping left her exhausted
    • he went to bed dog-tired
    • was fagged and sweaty
    • the trembling of his played out limbs
    • felt completely washed-out
    • only worn-out horses and cattle
    • you look worn out
WordNet

worn-out

  • adjective satellite used until no longer useful
    raddled.
    • battered trumpets and raddled radios
    • worn-out shoes with flapping soles
  • adjective satellite drained of energy or effectiveness; extremely tired; completely exhausted
    exhausted; spent; dog-tired; worn out; played out; fagged; fatigued; washed-out.
    • the day's shopping left her exhausted
    • he went to bed dog-tired
    • was fagged and sweaty
    • the trembling of his played out limbs
    • felt completely washed-out
    • only worn-out horses and cattle
    • you look worn out
WordNet
Worn"-out` adjective
Definitions
  1. Consumed, or rendered useless, by wearing; as, worn-out garments.
Webster 1913

wring out

  • verb extract (liquid) by squeezing or pressing
    squeeze out.
    • wring out the washcloth
WordNet

write out

  • verb put into writing; write in complete form
    write up.
    • write out a contract
  • verb make out and issue
    cut; make out; issue.
    • write out a check
    • cut a ticket
    • Please make the check out to me
WordNet

wrong-side-out

  • adjective satellite with the inside surface on the outside
    inside-out.
WordNet

wung-out

Wung"-out` adjective
Definitions
  1. Having the sails set in the manner called wing-and-wing. Sailors' slang
Webster 1913

zonk out

  • verb lose consciousness due to a sudden trauma, for example
    pass out; black out.
  • verb fall asleep fast, as when one is extremely tired
    • after the long drive, we zonked out and slept for 10 hours
WordNet