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off Idioms & Phrases


A chip off the old block

  • a child who resembles either of his parents. Colloq. Milton.-
Webster 1913

auction off

  • verb sell at an auction
    auction; auctioneer.
WordNet

Automatic expansion gearcut-off

  • one that is regulated by the governor, and varies the supply of steam to the engine with the demand for power.
Webster 1913

back off

  • verb move backwards from a certain position
    back down; back up.
    • The bully had to back down
  • verb remove oneself from an obligation
    back down; pull out; bow out; chicken out.
    • He bowed out when he heard how much work was involved
WordNet

bear off

  • verb remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional state; transport into a new location or state
    bear off; take away; carry away; bear away.
    • Their dreams carried the Romantics away into distant lands
    • The car carried us off to the meeting
    • I'll take you away on a holiday
    • I got carried away when I saw the dead man and I started to cry
WordNet

beetle off

  • verb leave suddenly and as if in a hurry
    bolt out; run out; bolt; beetle off.
    • The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas
    • When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out
WordNet

beg off

  • verb ask for permission to be released from an engagement
    excuse.
WordNet

better off

  • adjective satellite in a more fortunate or prosperous condition
    • she would have been better off if she had stuck with teaching
    • is better off than his classmate
WordNet

bind off

  • verb finish the last row
    tie up.
WordNet

bite off

  • verb bite off with a quick bite
    snap at.
    • The dog snapped off a piece of cloth from the intruder's pants
WordNet

blast off

  • verb launch with great force
    • the rockets were blasted off
WordNet

block off

  • verb obstruct access to
    blockade.
  • verb render unsuitable for passage
    bar; block up; stop; blockade; barricade; block.
    • block the way
    • barricade the streets
    • stop the busy road
  • verb block off the passage through
    block off; close off.
    • We shut off the valve
WordNet

blow off

  • verb come off due to an explosion or other strong force
WordNet

blow-off

Blow"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. A blowing off steam, water, etc.; -- Also, adj. as, a blow-off cock or pipe.
  2. An outburst of temper or excitement. Colloq.
Webster 1913

bound off

  • verb bound off one point after another
    skip.
WordNet

break off

  • verb interrupt before its natural or planned end
    break short; cut short.
    • We had to cut short our vacation
  • verb prevent completion
    break; stop; discontinue.
    • stop the project
    • break off the negotiations
  • verb break off (a piece from a whole)
    break away; chip; chip off; break off.
    • Her tooth chipped
  • verb break a piece from a whole
    break; break off.
    • break a branch from a tree
  • verb break a small piece off from
    knap; chip; break off.
    • chip the glass
    • chip a tooth
WordNet

breaking off

  • noun an instance of sudden interruption
    abruption.
WordNet

bring off

  • verb be successful; achieve a goal
    manage; negociate; bring off; carry off.
    • She succeeded in persuading us all
    • I managed to carry the box upstairs
    • She pulled it off, even though we never thought her capable of it
    • The pianist negociated the difficult runs
WordNet

browned off

  • adjective satellite greatly annoyed; out of patience
    browned off; exasperated.
    • had an exasperated look on his face
    • felt exasperated beyond endurance
WordNet

brush off

  • verb bar from attention or consideration
    dismiss; brush aside; ignore; discount; push aside; disregard.
    • She dismissed his advances
WordNet

brush-off

  • noun a curt or disdainful rejection
WordNet

bugger off

  • verb leave immediately; used usually in the imperative form
    bugger off; get; buzz off; scram.
    • Scram!
WordNet

bully off

  • verb start a game by a face-off
    bully off.
WordNet

bump off

  • verb kill intentionally and with premeditation
    murder; off; slay; dispatch; remove; hit; bump off.
    • The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered
WordNet

bundle off

  • verb send off unceremoniously
WordNet

bunk off

  • verb play truant from work or school
    play hooky.
    • The boy often plays hooky
WordNet

burn off

  • verb use up (energy)
    burn; burn up.
    • burn off calories through vigorous exercise
  • verb clear land of its vegetation by burning it off
WordNet

buy off

  • verb pay someone with influence in order to receive a favor
    buy off.
WordNet

buzz off

  • verb leave immediately; used usually in the imperative form
    bugger off; get; buzz off; scram.
    • Scram!
WordNet

call off

  • verb postpone indefinitely or annul something that was scheduled
    cancel; scratch; scrub.
    • Call off the engagement
    • cancel the dinner party
    • we had to scrub our vacation plans
    • scratch that meeting--the chair is ill
  • verb give the calls (to the dancers) for a square dance
    call.
WordNet

cap off

  • verb finish or complete, as with some decisive action
    • he capped off the meeting with a radical proposal
WordNet

carry off

  • verb be successful; achieve a goal
    manage; negociate; bring off; carry off.
    • She succeeded in persuading us all
    • I managed to carry the box upstairs
    • She pulled it off, even though we never thought her capable of it
    • The pianist negociated the difficult runs
  • verb remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional state; transport into a new location or state
    bear off; take away; carry away; bear away.
    • Their dreams carried the Romantics away into distant lands
    • The car carried us off to the meeting
    • I'll take you away on a holiday
    • I got carried away when I saw the dead man and I started to cry
  • verb kill in large numbers
    annihilate; decimate; eliminate; wipe out; extinguish; eradicate.
    • the plague wiped out an entire population
WordNet

cart off

  • verb take away by means of a vehicle
    cart off; haul away; cart away.
    • They carted off the old furniture
WordNet

cast off

  • verb get rid of
    shake off; shed; throw away; drop; cast off; cast; throw.
    • he shed his image as a pushy boss
    • shed your clothes
  • verb make the last row of stitches when knitting
WordNet

cast-off

  • adjective satellite thrown away
    discarded; thrown-away; throwaway.
    • wearing someone's cast-off clothes
    • throwaway children living on the streets
    • salvaged some thrown-away furniture
WordNet
Cast"-off` adjective
Definitions
  1. Cast or laid aside; as, cast-off clothes.
Webster 1913

check off

  • verb put a check mark on or near or next to
    mark off; check off; mark; tick; check.
    • Please check each name on the list
    • tick off the items
    • mark off the units
WordNet

cheesed off

  • adjective satellite greatly annoyed; out of patience
    browned off; exasperated.
    • had an exasperated look on his face
    • felt exasperated beyond endurance
WordNet

chip off

  • verb break off (a piece from a whole)
    break away; chip; chip off; break off.
    • Her tooth chipped
WordNet

choke off

  • verb suppress
    choke back; choke down.
    • He choked down his rage
  • verb become or cause to become obstructed
    clog; congest; choke; foul; clog up; back up.
    • The leaves clog our drains in the Fall
    • The water pipe is backed up
WordNet

chop off

  • verb remove by or as if by cutting
    cut off; chop off.
    • cut off the ear
    • lop off the dead branch
WordNet

clear off

  • verb remove from sight
    clear away.
WordNet

click off

  • verb perform or finish an action rapidly
    • The game was clicked off in 1:48
WordNet

clock off

  • verb register one's departure from work
    punch out; clock out.
WordNet

close off

  • verb stem the flow of
    close off.
    • shut off the gas when you leave for a vacation
  • verb isolate or separate
    close off.
    • She was shut off from the friends
  • verb block off the passage through
    block off; close off.
    • We shut off the valve
WordNet

closing off

  • noun the act of isolating something; setting something apart from others
    isolation.
WordNet

come off

  • verb come to be detached
    come away; detach.
    • His retina detached and he had to be rushed into surgery
  • verb happen in a particular manner
    go over; come off.
    • how did your talk go over?
  • verb break off (a piece from a whole)
    break away; chip; chip off; break off.
    • Her tooth chipped
WordNet

cool off

  • verb become quiet or calm, especially after a state of agitation
    calm; calm down; simmer down; cool it; chill out; settle down.
    • After the fight both men need to cool off.
    • It took a while after the baby was born for things to settle down again.
  • verb lose intensity
    cool down; cool.
    • His enthusiasm cooled considerably
  • verb feel less enamoured of something or somebody
WordNet

cordon off

  • verb divide by means of a rope
    rope in; cordon off.
    • The police roped off the area where the crime occurred
WordNet

count off

  • verb call in turn from right to left or from back to front numbers that determine some position or function
WordNet

cream off

  • verb remove from the surface
    cream off; skim; cream.
    • skim cream from the surface of milk
  • verb pick the best
    cream off.
WordNet

cross off

  • verb remove from a list
    strike out; mark; cross out; cross off.
    • Cross the name of the dead person off the list
WordNet

curtain off

  • verb separate by means of a curtain
WordNet

cut off

  • verb make a break in
    interrupt; disrupt; break up.
    • We interrupt the program for the following messages
  • verb cease, stop
    cut.
    • cut the noise
    • We had to cut short the conversation
  • verb remove by or as if by cutting
    cut off; chop off.
    • cut off the ear
    • lop off the dead branch
  • verb cut off and stop
    cut out.
    • The bicyclist was cut out by the van
  • verb break a small piece off from
    knap; chip; break off.
    • chip the glass
    • chip a tooth
  • verb remove surgically
    amputate.
    • amputate limbs
  • adjective satellite detached by cutting
    severed.
    • cut flowers
    • a severed head
    • an old tale of Anne Bolyn walking the castle walls with her poor cut-off head under her arm
WordNet

cut-off

Cut"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. That which cuts off or shortens, as a nearer passage or road.
  2. (Mach.) (a) The valve gearing or mechanism by which steam is cut off from entering the cylinder of a steam engine after a definite point in a stroke, so as to allow the remainder of the stroke to be made by the expansive force of the steam already let in. See Expansion gear, under Expansion. (b) Any device for stopping or changing a current, as of grain or water in a spout.
Webster 1913

cutting off

  • noun the act of cutting something off
    abscission.
  • noun the act of shortening something by chopping off the ends
    cutting; cut.
    • the barber gave him a good cut
WordNet

damp off

Damp" off`
Definitions
  1. To decay and perish through excessive moisture.
Webster 1913

damping off

  • noun a plant disease caused by a fungus; diseased condition of seedlings in excessive moisture
WordNet

damping off fungus

  • noun fungus causing damping off disease in seedlings
    Pythium debaryanum.
WordNet

dash off

  • verb write quickly
    fling off; dash off; knock off; scratch off.
    • She dashed off a note to her husband saying she would not be home for supper
    • He scratched off a thank-you note to the hostess
  • verb write down hastily
    dash down.
    • She dashed off a letter to her lawyer
WordNet

day off

  • noun a day when you are not required to work
    • Thursday is his day off
WordNet

die off

  • verb become extinct
    die out.
    • Dinosaurs died out
WordNet

dope off

  • verb change from a waking to a sleeping state
    drowse off; drift off; flake out; drop off; dope off; fall asleep; doze off.
    • he always falls asleep during lectures
WordNet

doze off

  • verb change from a waking to a sleeping state
    drowse off; drift off; flake out; drop off; dope off; fall asleep; doze off.
    • he always falls asleep during lectures
WordNet

draw off

  • verb remove by drawing or pulling
    draw away; draw off.
    • She placed the tray down and drew off the cloth
    • draw away the cloth that is covering the cheese
  • verb remove (a commodity) from (a supply source)
    take out; draw; withdraw.
    • She drew $2,000 from the account
    • The doctors drew medical supplies from the hospital's emergency bank
WordNet

drawing off

  • noun act of getting or draining something such as electricity or a liquid from a source
    drawing.
    • the drawing of water from the well
WordNet

drift off

  • verb change from a waking to a sleeping state
    drowse off; drift off; flake out; drop off; dope off; fall asleep; doze off.
    • he always falls asleep during lectures
WordNet

drive off

  • verb force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings
    turn back; drive out; dispel; drive away; chase away; drive off.
    • Drive away potential burglars
    • drive away bad thoughts
    • dispel doubts
    • The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers
WordNet

drop off

  • verb fall or diminish
    • The number of students in this course dropped off after the first test
  • verb change from a waking to a sleeping state
    drowse off; drift off; flake out; drop off; dope off; fall asleep; doze off.
    • he always falls asleep during lectures
  • verb leave or unload
    unload; drop; put down; set down; discharge.
    • unload the cargo
    • drop off the passengers at the hotel
  • verb retreat
    fall back; fall behind; recede; lose.
  • verb get worse
    drop away; slip; fall away.
    • My grades are slipping
WordNet

drop-off

  • noun a noticeable deterioration in performance or quality
    slump; slack; falloff; drop-off.
    • the team went into a slump
    • a gradual slack in output
    • a drop-off in attendance
    • a falloff in quality
  • noun a steep high face of rock
    drop; cliff.
    • he stood on a high cliff overlooking the town
    • a steep drop
  • noun a change downward
    decrease; lessening.
    • there was a decrease in his temperature as the fever subsided
    • there was a sharp drop-off in sales
WordNet

drop-off charge

  • noun a fee added for returning a rented car to a location different from the one where it was rented
WordNet

drowse off

  • verb change from a waking to a sleeping state
    drowse off; drift off; flake out; drop off; dope off; fall asleep; doze off.
    • he always falls asleep during lectures
WordNet

ease off

  • verb become less intense
    ease up; flag; ease off.
  • verb reduce pressure or intensity
    ease up; let up.
    • he eased off the gas pedal and the car slowed down
WordNet

ebb off

  • verb flow back or recede
    ebb out; ebb down; ebb away; ebb.
    • the tides ebbed at noon
WordNet

even off

  • verb adjust for
    make up; compensate; counterbalance; even out; even up; correct.
    • engineers will work to correct the effects or air resistance
WordNet

face off

  • verb start a game by a face-off
    bully off.
WordNet

face-off

  • noun a hostile disagreement face-to-face
    showdown; confrontation; encounter.
  • noun (ice hockey) the method of starting play; a referee drops the puck between two opposing players
WordNet

fall off

  • verb come off
    • This button had fallen off
  • verb fall heavily or suddenly; decline markedly
    slump; sink.
    • The real estate market fell off
  • verb diminish in size or intensity
    fall away.
WordNet

Falling away, Falling off

  • etc. See To fall away, To fall off, etc., under Fall, v. i.
Webster 1913

falling off

  • noun a noticeable deterioration in performance or quality
    slump; slack; falloff; drop-off.
    • the team went into a slump
    • a gradual slack in output
    • a drop-off in attendance
    • a falloff in quality
WordNet

Far off

  • . (a) At a great distance, absolutely or relatively. (b) Distant in sympathy or affection; alienated. "But now, in Christ Jesus, ye who some time were far off are made nigh by the blood of Christ." Eph. ii. 13.
Webster 1913

far-off

  • adjective satellite very far away in space or time
    faraway.
    • faraway mountains
    • the faraway future
    • troops landing on far-off shores
    • far-off happier times
WordNet

fend off

  • verb prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening
    stave off; avert; debar; avoid; deflect; obviate; head off; forefend; fend off; forfend.
    • Let's avoid a confrontation
    • head off a confrontation
    • avert a strike
WordNet

fight off

  • verb force or drive back
    repulse; repel; drive back; rebuff.
    • repel the attacker
    • fight off the onslaught
    • rebuff the attack
WordNet

finish off

  • verb finish a task completely
    finish up; get through; wrap up; clear up; mop up; finish off.
    • I finally got through this homework assignment
WordNet

firing off

  • noun the act of discharging a gun
    discharge; firing.
WordNet

first off

  • adverb before anything else
    firstly; foremost; first of all; first.
    • first we must consider the garter snake
WordNet

Fixed expansion gear, ∨ Fixed cut-off

  • one that always operates at the same fixed point of the stroke.
Webster 1913

flake off

  • verb come off in flakes or thin small pieces
    flake off; flake; peel.
    • The paint in my house is peeling off
WordNet

fling off

  • verb write quickly
    fling off; dash off; knock off; scratch off.
    • She dashed off a note to her husband saying she would not be home for supper
    • He scratched off a thank-you note to the hostess
WordNet

flow off

  • verb flow off or away gradually
    flow away.
    • The water flowed off from the pipe
WordNet

fly off the handle

  • verb get very angry and fly into a rage
    hit the roof; flip one's lid; have kittens; go ballistic; flip one's wig; hit the ceiling; throw a fit; blow one's stack; lose one's temper; combust; blow up; blow a fuse; have a fit.
    • The professor combusted when the student didn't know the answer to a very elementary question
    • Spam makes me go ballistic
WordNet

fob off

  • verb sell as genuine, sell with the intention to deceive
    foist off; fob off.
WordNet

foist off

  • verb sell as genuine, sell with the intention to deceive
    foist off; fob off.
WordNet

freeze off

  • verb reject with contempt
    spurn; disdain; reject; scorn; pooh-pooh; turn down.
    • She spurned his advances
WordNet

frighten off

  • verb cause to lose courage
    scare away; frighten off; dash; pall; daunt; scare; frighten away.
    • dashed by the refusal
WordNet

From off

  • off from; off. "A live coal...taken with the tongs from off the altar." Is. vi. 6.
Webster 1913

fuck off

  • verb be lazy or idle
    loaf; lounge around; loll; lounge about; frig around; bum; arse around; bum around; waste one's time; arse about; loll around; bum about.
    • Her son is just bumming around all day
  • verb leave immediately; used usually in the imperative form
    bugger off; get; buzz off; scram.
    • Scram!
  • verb get sexual gratification through self-stimulation
    fuck off; wank; she-bop; masturbate; jack off.
WordNet

Further off

  • not so near; apart by a greater distance.
Webster 1913

get off

  • verb leave a vehicle, aircraft, etc.
  • verb be relieved of one's duties temporarily
  • verb transfer
    get off; send.
    • The spy sent the classified information off to Russia
  • verb cause to be acquitted; get off the hook; in a legal case
    • The lawyer got him off, even though there was no doubt in everybody's mind that he killed his wife
  • verb escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action
    get out; escape; get by; get away.
    • She gets away with murder!
    • I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities
  • verb enjoy in a sexual way
    • He gets off on shoes
  • verb alight from (a horse)
    light; dismount; unhorse; get down.
  • verb get out of quickly
    hop out.
    • The officer hopped out when he spotted an illegally parked car
  • verb send via the postal service
    mail.
    • I'll mail you the check tomorrow
  • verb get high, stoned, or drugged
    trip out; turn on; trip.
    • He trips every weekend
  • verb deliver verbally
    • He got off the best line I've heard in a long time
WordNet

get off the ground

  • verb get started or set in motion, used figuratively
    get off the ground.
    • the project took a long time to get off the ground
WordNet

give off

  • verb have as a by-product
    • The big cities gave off so many wonderful American qualities
  • verb give off, send forth, or discharge; as of light, heat, or radiation, vapor, etc.
    give out; emit.
    • The ozone layer blocks some harmful rays which the sun emits
WordNet

go off

  • verb run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    abscond; make off; absquatulate; decamp; bolt; go off.
    • The thief made off with our silver
    • the accountant absconded with the cash from the safe
  • verb be discharged or activated
    • the explosive devices went off
  • verb go off or discharge
    fire; discharge.
    • The gun fired
  • verb stop running, functioning, or operating
    • Our power went off during the hurricane
  • verb happen in a particular manner
    go over; come off.
    • how did your talk go over?
  • verb burst inward
    implode.
    • The bottle imploded
WordNet

go off at half-cock

  • verb act prematurely or without reflection or too soon
    go off at half-cock.
    • she wanted to quit her job but her mother told her not to go off half-cocked
WordNet

go off half-cocked

  • verb act prematurely or without reflection or too soon
    go off at half-cock.
    • she wanted to quit her job but her mother told her not to go off half-cocked
WordNet

goof-off

  • noun an idle worthless person
    no-account; goldbrick; good-for-naught; good-for-nothing; ne'er-do-well.
WordNet

goofing off

  • noun the evasion of work or duty
    slacking; shirking; soldiering; goldbricking.
WordNet

Governor cut-off

  • (Steam Engine), a variable cut-off gear in which the governor acts in such a way as to cause the steam to be cut off from entering the cylinder at points of the stroke dependent upon the engine's speed.
Webster 1913

hands-off

  • adjective satellite not involving participation or intervention
    • a hands-off foreign policy
WordNet

haul off

  • verb take away by means of a vehicle
    cart off; haul away; cart away.
    • They carted off the old furniture
WordNet

have it off

  • verb have sexual intercourse with
    love; fuck; sleep with; have it away; screw; have intercourse; get it on; lie with; hump; make love; make out; get laid; have a go at it; bonk; eff; have sex; jazz; be intimate; know; bang; bed; do it; roll in the hay; sleep together.
    • This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm
    • Adam knew Eve
    • Were you ever intimate with this man?
WordNet

head off

  • verb prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening
    stave off; avert; debar; avoid; deflect; obviate; head off; forefend; fend off; forfend.
    • Let's avoid a confrontation
    • head off a confrontation
    • avert a strike
WordNet

hive off

  • verb remove from a group and make separate
    • The unit was hived off from its parent company
  • verb withdraw (money) and move into a different location, often secretly and with dishonest intentions
    divert.
WordNet

hold off

  • verb resist and fight to a standoff
    • Dallas had enough of a lead to hold the Broncos off
  • verb wait before acting
    hold back; wait.
    • the scientists held off announcing their results until they repeated the experiment
WordNet

jack off

  • verb get sexual gratification through self-stimulation
    fuck off; wank; she-bop; masturbate; jack off.
WordNet

jacking off

  • noun slang for masturbation
    wank; jacking off; hand job.
WordNet

jerk off

  • verb get sexual gratification through self-stimulation
    fuck off; wank; she-bop; masturbate; jack off.
WordNet

jerk-off

  • noun terms of abuse for a masturbator
    tosser; wanker.
WordNet

jerking off

  • noun slang for masturbation
    wank; jacking off; hand job.
WordNet

jump off

  • verb set off quickly, usually with success
    • The freshman jumped off to a good start in his math class
  • verb jump down from an elevated point
    jump; leap.
    • the parachutist didn't want to jump
    • every year, hundreds of people jump off the Golden Gate bridge
    • the widow leapt into the funeral pyre
WordNet

jumping-off place

  • noun a place from which an enterprise or expedition is launched
    point of departure.
    • one day when I was at a suitable jumping-off place I decided to see if I could find him
    • my point of departure was San Francisco
WordNet

jumping-off point

  • noun a beginning from which an enterprise is launched
    point of departure; springboard.
    • he uses other people's ideas as a springboard for his own
    • reality provides the jumping-off point for his illusions
    • the point of departure of international comparison cannot be an institution but must be the function it carries out
WordNet

keep off

  • verb refrain from certain foods or beverages
    avoid.
    • I keep off drugs
    • During Ramadan, Muslims avoid tobacco during the day
  • verb refrain from entering or walking onto
    keep off.
    • keep off the grass
    • stay off the premises
WordNet

keep one's eyes off

  • verb stay clear of, avoid
    keep one's eyes off; stay away; stand back; keep one's distance.
    • Keep your hands off my wife!
    • Keep your distance from this man--he is dangerous
WordNet

keep one's hands off

  • verb stay clear of, avoid
    keep one's eyes off; stay away; stand back; keep one's distance.
    • Keep your hands off my wife!
    • Keep your distance from this man--he is dangerous
WordNet

kick off

  • verb commence officially
    inaugurate.
WordNet

kill off

  • verb kill en masse; kill on a large scale; kill many
    exterminate.
    • Hitler wanted to exterminate the Jews, Gypsies, Communists, and homosexuals of Europe
WordNet

Knock off

  • verb get rid of (someone who may be a threat) by killing
    neutralize; liquidate; do in; waste; neutralise.
    • The mafia liquidated the informer
    • the double agent was neutralized
  • verb cut the price of
    shave.
  • verb take by theft
    cop; glom; thieve; hook; snitch.
    • Someone snitched my wallet!
  • verb write quickly
    fling off; dash off; knock off; scratch off.
    • She dashed off a note to her husband saying she would not be home for supper
    • He scratched off a thank-you note to the hostess
  • verb stop pursuing or acting
    drop.
    • drop a lawsuit
    • knock it off!
WordNet
  • a device in a knitting machine to remove loops from the needles.
Webster 1913

laid-off

  • adjective satellite having lost your job
    pink-slipped; dismissed; discharged; fired.
WordNet

laugh off

  • verb deal with a problem by laughing or pretending to be amused by it
    laugh away.
    • She laughs away all these problems
WordNet

lay off

  • verb put an end to a state or an activity
    quit; discontinue; stop; give up; cease.
    • Quit teasing your little brother
  • verb dismiss, usually for economic reasons
    furlough.
    • She was laid off together with hundreds of other workers when the company downsized
WordNet

lead off

  • verb teach immoral behavior to
    lead astray.
    • It was common practice to lead off the young ones, and teach them bad habits
  • verb set in motion, cause to start
    start; begin; commence.
    • The U.S. started a war in the Middle East
    • The Iraqis began hostilities
    • begin a new chapter in your life
WordNet

leading off

  • noun the act of enticing others into sinful ways
    leading astray.
WordNet

leave off

  • verb come to an end, stop or cease
    • the road leaves off at the edge of the forest
    • leave off where you started
  • verb prevent from being included or considered or accepted
    take out; omit; except; leave out; exclude.
    • The bad results were excluded from the report
    • Leave off the top piece
  • verb stop using
    • leave off your jacket--no need to wear it here
WordNet

left-off

Left"-off" adjective
Definitions
  1. Laid a side; cast-off.
Webster 1913

let off

  • verb grant exemption or release to
    excuse; relieve; exempt.
    • Please excuse me from this class
WordNet

let-off

Let"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. (Mach.) A device for letting off, releasing, or giving forth, as the warp from the cylinder of a loom.
Webster 1913

level off

  • verb become level or even
    level.
    • The ground levelled off
WordNet

lift off

  • verb depart from the ground
    lift off.
    • The plane took off two hours late
WordNet

lip off

  • verb speak spontaneously and without restraint
    lip off.
    • She always shoots her mouth off and says things she later regrets
WordNet

log off

  • verb exit a computer
    log out.
    • Please log off before you go home
WordNet

loose off

  • verb fire as from a gun
    let fly; let drive.
    • The soldiers let drive their bullets
WordNet

lop off

  • verb remove by or as if by cutting
    cut off; chop off.
    • cut off the ear
    • lop off the dead branch
WordNet

make off

  • verb run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    abscond; make off; absquatulate; decamp; bolt; go off.
    • The thief made off with our silver
    • the accountant absconded with the cash from the safe
WordNet

mark off

  • verb set boundaries to and delimit
    mark out.
    • mark out the territory
  • verb put a check mark on or near or next to
    mark off; check off; mark; tick; check.
    • Please check each name on the list
    • tick off the items
    • mark off the units
WordNet

melt off

  • verb take off weight
    slim; slenderize; reduce; slim down; lose weight; thin.
WordNet

mid-off

  • noun the fielding position in cricket closest to the bowler on the off side
WordNet

mouth off

  • verb talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner
    rabbit on; spout; rant; rave; jabber.
WordNet

nip off

  • verb sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    snip; nip; nip off; clip.
    • nip off the flowers
WordNet

nod off

  • verb change from a waking to a sleeping state
    drowse off; drift off; flake out; drop off; dope off; fall asleep; doze off.
    • he always falls asleep during lectures
WordNet

Nothing off

  • (Naut.), an order to the steersman to keep the vessel close to the wind.
Webster 1913

Off and on

  • adverb not regularly
    off and on.
    • they phone each other off and on
WordNet
  • . (a) Not constantly; not regularly; now and then; occasionally . (b) (Naut.) On different tacks, now toward, and now away from, the land.
Webster 1913

off guard

  • adjective satellite not prepared or vigilant
    off her guard; off guard; napping; off one's guard; off his guard; off your guard.
    • the blow caught him napping
    • caught in an off-guard moment
    • found him off his guard
WordNet

Off hand

  • . See Offhand.
Webster 1913

off her guard

  • adjective satellite not prepared or vigilant
    off her guard; off guard; napping; off one's guard; off his guard; off your guard.
    • the blow caught him napping
    • caught in an off-guard moment
    • found him off his guard
WordNet

off his guard

  • adjective satellite not prepared or vigilant
    off her guard; off guard; napping; off one's guard; off his guard; off your guard.
    • the blow caught him napping
    • caught in an off-guard moment
    • found him off his guard
WordNet

off one's guard

  • adjective satellite not prepared or vigilant
    off her guard; off guard; napping; off one's guard; off his guard; off your guard.
    • the blow caught him napping
    • caught in an off-guard moment
    • found him off his guard
WordNet

Off side

  • (Football), out of play; said when a player has got in front of the ball in a scrimmage, or when the ball has been last touched by one of his own side behind him.
  • . (a) The right hand side in driving; the farther side . See Gee. (b) (Cricket) See Off, n.
Webster 1913

off the beaten track

  • adjective satellite remote from populous or much-traveled regions
    out-of-the-way.
    • they found a quiet out-of-the-way resort
WordNet

off the cuff

  • adverb without preparation
    • the presidential candidate made a remark off the cuff
WordNet

off the hook

  • adjective satellite freed from danger or blame or obligation
    • I let him off the hook with a mild reprimand
WordNet

off the record

  • adverb not for quotation
    • he spoke to the reporter off the record
WordNet

off year

  • noun a year in which productivity is low or inferior
  • noun a year in which no major political elections are held
WordNet

off your guard

  • adjective satellite not prepared or vigilant
    off her guard; off guard; napping; off one's guard; off his guard; off your guard.
    • the blow caught him napping
    • caught in an off-guard moment
    • found him off his guard
WordNet

off-and-on

  • adjective satellite intermittently stopping and starting
    fitful; interrupted.
    • fitful (or interrupted) sleep
    • off-and-on static
WordNet

off-axis reflector

  • noun a reflecting telescope with the mirror slightly tilted to throw the image to the side where it can be viewed
    Herschelian telescope.
WordNet

off-base

  • adjective satellite located outside a military base
    • off-base housing
WordNet

off-broadway

  • noun low-budget theaters located outside the Broadway area in Manhattan
WordNet

off-center

  • adjective satellite situated away from the center or axis
    off-center.
WordNet

off-centered

  • adjective satellite situated away from the center or axis
    off-center.
WordNet

off-color

  • adjective satellite in violation of good taste even verging on the indecent
    indelicate; off-color.
    • an indelicate remark
    • an off-color joke
  • adjective satellite humorously vulgar
    bawdy; ribald.
    • bawdy songs
    • off-color jokes
    • ribald language
WordNet

off-colour

  • adjective satellite in violation of good taste even verging on the indecent
    indelicate; off-color.
    • an indelicate remark
    • an off-color joke
WordNet

off-day

  • noun a day when things go poorly
    • I guess this is one of my off-days
WordNet

off-guard

  • adjective satellite not prepared or vigilant
    off her guard; off guard; napping; off one's guard; off his guard; off your guard.
    • the blow caught him napping
    • caught in an off-guard moment
    • found him off his guard
WordNet

off-hand

  • adverb without preparation
    ex tempore.
    • I don't know the figures off-hand
WordNet

off-key

  • adjective satellite inaccurate in pitch
    sour; false.
    • a false (or sour) note
    • her singing was off key
WordNet

off-licence

  • noun a store that sells alcoholic beverages for consumption elsewhere
    liquor store; package store.
WordNet

off-limits

  • adjective satellite barred to a designated group
    out-of-bounds.
    • that area is off-limits
WordNet

off-line

  • adjective not on a regular route of a transportation system
    • an off-line ticket office
  • adjective not connected to a computer network
    • off-line resources
WordNet

off-line equipment

  • noun electronic equipment not in direct communication (or under the control of) the central processing unit
    auxiliary equipment.
WordNet

off-line operation

  • noun a operation performed by off-line equipment not under the control of the central processing unit
    auxiliary operation.
WordNet

off-putting

  • adjective satellite causing annoyance or repugnance
    • an off-putting remark
  • adjective satellite tending to repel
    • The trappings of upper-class life are off-putting and sterile"- Elizabeth Hess
WordNet

off-roader

  • noun a bicycle with a sturdy frame and fat tires; originally designed for riding in mountainous country
    all-terrain bike; mountain bike.
WordNet

off-season

  • noun the season when travel is least active and rates are lowest
WordNet

off-site

  • adjective taking place or located away from the site
    • an off-site waste treatment operation
WordNet

off-speed pitch

  • noun a baseball thrown with little velocity when the batter is expecting a fastball
    change-of-pace; change-of-pace ball; change-up.
WordNet

off-street

  • adjective not on the streets
    • off-street parking
    • off-street unloading of vehicles
WordNet

off-the-clock

  • adverb overtime without extra compensation
    • she often has to work off-the-clock
WordNet

off-the-cuff

  • adjective satellite with little or no preparation or forethought
    extemporaneous; extempore; offhand; ad-lib; offhanded; extemporary; unrehearsed; impromptu.
    • his ad-lib comments showed poor judgment
    • an extemporaneous piano recital
    • an extemporary lecture
    • an extempore skit
    • an impromptu speech
    • offhand excuses
    • trying to sound offhanded and reassuring
    • an off-the-cuff toast
    • a few unrehearsed comments
WordNet

off-the-peg

  • adjective satellite (especially of clothing) made in standard sizes and available from merchandise in stock
    ready-to-wear; off-the-peg; off-the-rack.
    • a ready-made jacket
    • ready-to-wear clothes
WordNet

off-the-rack

  • adjective satellite (especially of clothing) made in standard sizes and available from merchandise in stock
    ready-to-wear; off-the-peg; off-the-rack.
    • a ready-made jacket
    • ready-to-wear clothes
WordNet

off-the-shelf

  • adjective satellite (especially of clothing) made in standard sizes and available from merchandise in stock
    ready-to-wear; off-the-peg; off-the-rack.
    • a ready-made jacket
    • ready-to-wear clothes
WordNet

off-the-shoulder

  • adjective satellite not covering the shoulders (especially in the case of a blouse or dress)
WordNet

off-the-wall

  • adjective satellite conspicuously or grossly unconventional or unusual
    gonzo; freakish; eccentric; outre; flaky; outlandish; bizarre; freaky; flakey.
    • restaurants of bizarre design--one like a hat, another like a rabbit
    • famed for his eccentric spelling
    • a freakish combination of styles
    • his off-the-wall antics
    • the outlandish clothes of teenagers
    • outre and affected stage antics
WordNet

off-white

  • noun a shade of white the color of bleached bones
    pearl; ivory; bone.
  • adjective satellite of something having a color tending toward white
    whitish.
WordNet

on and off

  • adverb not regularly
    off and on.
    • they phone each other off and on
WordNet

on-off switch

  • noun a hinged switch that can assume either of two positions
    on/off switch; toggle switch; toggle.
WordNet

one-off

  • noun a happening that occurs only once and is not repeated
WordNet

pair off

  • verb form a pair or pairs
    pair; pair off; couple.
    • The two old friends paired off
WordNet

palm off

  • verb sell as genuine, sell with the intention to deceive
    foist off; fob off.
WordNet

pan off

  • verb wash dirt in a pan to separate out the precious minerals
    pan out; pan.
WordNet

partition off

  • verb divide into parts, pieces, or sections
    partition.
    • The Arab peninsula was partitioned by the British
WordNet

partner off

  • verb form a pair or pairs
    pair; pair off; couple.
    • The two old friends paired off
WordNet

pass off

  • verb be accepted as something or somebody in a false character or identity
    • She passed off as a Russian agent
  • verb disregard
    • She passed off the insult
  • verb cause to be circulated and accepted in a false character or identity
    • She passed the glass off as diamonds
    • He passed himself off as a secret agent
  • verb disappear gradually
    blow over; fade; pass; evanesce; fleet.
    • The pain eventually passed off
  • verb come to pass
    fall out; come about; pass; hap; happen; take place; occur; go on.
    • What is happening?
    • The meeting took place off without an incidence
    • Nothing occurred that seemed important
  • verb expel (gases or odors)
    breathe; emit.
WordNet

pay off

  • verb yield a profit or result
    • His efforts finally paid off
  • verb eliminate by paying off (debts)
    liquidate.
  • verb pay off (loans or promissory notes)
    redeem.
  • verb do or give something to somebody in return
    pay; compensate; make up.
    • Does she pay you for the work you are doing?
  • verb pay someone with influence in order to receive a favor
    buy off.
  • verb take vengeance on or get even
    fix; get; pay back.
    • We'll get them!
    • That'll fix him good!
    • This time I got him
WordNet

peel off

  • verb peel off the outer layer of something
  • verb take off, as with some difficulty
    • He peeled off his blood-soaked shirt
  • verb leave a formation
  • verb come off in flakes or thin small pieces
    flake off; flake; peel.
    • The paint in my house is peeling off
  • verb peel off in scales
    desquamate.
    • dry skin desquamates
WordNet

pension off

  • verb let go from employment with an attractive pension
    • The director was pensioned off when he got senile
  • verb grant a pension to
    pension.
WordNet

pick off

  • verb shoot one by one
  • verb pull or pull out sharply
    tweak; pick off; pluck.
    • pluck the flowers off the bush
WordNet

pick-off

  • noun a baseball play in which a base runner is caught off base and tagged out
WordNet

pissed off

  • adjective satellite aroused to impatience or anger
    nettled; riled; peeved; stung; miffed; roiled; steamed; annoyed; pissed; irritated.
    • made an irritated gesture
    • feeling nettled from the constant teasing
    • peeved about being left out
    • felt really pissed at her snootiness
    • riled no end by his lies
    • roiled by the delay
WordNet

play off

  • verb set into opposition or rivalry
    oppose; pit; match.
    • let them match their best athletes against ours
    • pit a chess player against the Russian champion
    • He plays his two children off against each other
WordNet

polish off

  • verb finish a task completely
    finish up; get through; wrap up; clear up; mop up; finish off.
    • I finally got through this homework assignment
  • verb kill intentionally and with premeditation
    murder; off; slay; dispatch; remove; hit; bump off.
    • The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered
  • verb finish eating all the food on one's plate or on the table
    eat up; finish.
    • She polished off the remaining potatoes
WordNet

Poorly off

  • not well off; not rich.
Webster 1913

pop off

  • verb leave quickly
  • verb pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life
    decease; give-up the ghost; perish; die; buy the farm; snuff it; choke; drop dead; pass away; expire; exit; croak; pass; go; kick the bucket; conk; cash in one's chips.
    • She died from cancer
    • The children perished in the fire
    • The patient went peacefully
    • The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102
WordNet

pound off

  • verb partition off into compartments
    pound.
    • The locks pound the water of the canal
WordNet

pull off

  • verb pull or pull out sharply
    tweak; pick off; pluck.
    • pluck the flowers off the bush
  • verb cause to withdraw
    • We pulled this firm off the project because they overcharged
  • verb be successful; achieve a goal
    manage; negociate; bring off; carry off.
    • She succeeded in persuading us all
    • I managed to carry the box upstairs
    • She pulled it off, even though we never thought her capable of it
    • The pianist negociated the difficult runs
  • verb remove by drawing or pulling
    draw away; draw off.
    • She placed the tray down and drew off the cloth
    • draw away the cloth that is covering the cheese
WordNet

pull-off

  • noun designated paved area beside a main road where cars can stop temporarily
    rest stop; lay-by; rest area; layby.
WordNet

put off

  • verb hold back to a later time
    prorogue; set back; defer; remit; put over; shelve; table; postpone; hold over.
    • let's postpone the exam
  • verb cause to feel intense dislike or distaste
    put off.
  • verb take away the enthusiasm of
    dishearten.
  • verb cause to feel embarrassment
    disconcert; flurry; confuse.
    • The constant attention of the young man confused her
  • verb avoid or try to avoid fulfilling, answering, or performing (duties, questions, or issues)
    dodge; fudge; sidestep; evade; parry; elude; skirt; duck; hedge; circumvent.
    • He dodged the issue
    • she skirted the problem
    • They tend to evade their responsibilities
    • he evaded the questions skillfully
WordNet

put-off

Put"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. A shift for evasion or delay; an evasion; an excuse. L'Estrange.
Webster 1913

raffle off

  • verb dispose of in a lottery
    raffle.
    • We raffled off a trip to the Bahamas
WordNet

rail off

  • verb separate with a railing
    rail.
    • rail off the crowds from the Presidential palace
WordNet

rake off

  • verb take money from an illegal transaction
WordNet

rake-off

  • noun a percentage (of winnings or loot or profit) taken by an operator or gangster
    vigorish.
WordNet

rattle off

  • verb recite volubly or extravagantly
    rattle down; roll off; reel off; rattle off.
    • He could recite the names of all the chemical elements
WordNet

reel off

  • verb unwind from or as if from a reel
    unreel.
    • unreel the tape
  • verb recite volubly or extravagantly
    rattle down; roll off; reel off; rattle off.
    • He could recite the names of all the chemical elements
WordNet

ride off

  • verb ride away on a horse, for example
    ride away.
WordNet

Right away, ∨ Right off

  • at once; straightway; without delay. Colloq. U.S. "We will . . . shut ourselves up in the office and do the work right off." D. Webster.
Webster 1913

rinse off

  • verb wash off soap or remaining dirt
    rinse.
WordNet

rip off

  • verb deprive somebody of something by deceit
    cheat; chisel.
    • The con-man beat me out of $50
    • This salesman ripped us off!
    • we were cheated by their clever-sounding scheme
    • They chiseled me out of my money
WordNet

rip-off

  • noun the act of stealing
    heist.
WordNet

roar off

  • verb leave
    • The car roared off into the fog
WordNet

roll off

  • verb recite volubly or extravagantly
    rattle down; roll off; reel off; rattle off.
    • He could recite the names of all the chemical elements
WordNet

roll-on roll-off

  • noun a method of transport (as a ferry or train or plane) that vehicles roll onto at the beginning and roll off of at the destination
WordNet

rope off

  • verb divide by means of a rope
    rope in; cordon off.
    • The police roped off the area where the crime occurred
WordNet

round off

  • verb make round
    round out; round.
    • round the edges
  • verb bring to a highly developed, finished, or refined state
    polish up; polish; round; brush up.
    • polish your social manners
  • verb express as a round number
    round out; round down; round.
    • round off the amount
WordNet

rub off

  • verb wear away
    corrade; abrase; abrade; rub down.
WordNet

run off

  • verb run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    abscond; make off; absquatulate; decamp; bolt; go off.
    • The thief made off with our silver
    • the accountant absconded with the cash from the safe
  • verb leave suddenly and as if in a hurry
    bolt out; run out; bolt; beetle off.
    • The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas
    • When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out
  • verb force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings
    turn back; drive out; dispel; drive away; chase away; drive off.
    • Drive away potential burglars
    • drive away bad thoughts
    • dispel doubts
    • The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers
  • verb run away secretly with one's beloved
    elope.
    • The young couple eloped and got married in Las Vegas
  • verb run off as waste
    waste.
    • The water wastes back into the ocean
  • verb reproduce by xerography
    photocopy; xerox.
  • verb decide (a contest or competition) by a runoff
WordNet

rush off

  • verb depart in a hurry
    rush away.
WordNet

sawed-off

  • adjective satellite well below average height
    sawed-off; pint-sized; pint-size; runty.
  • adjective satellite cut short
    sawed-off; shortened.
    • a sawed-off shotgun
    • a sawed-off broomstick
    • the shortened rope was easier to use
WordNet

sawed-off shotgun

  • noun a shotgun with short barrels
WordNet

sawn-off

  • adjective satellite well below average height
    sawed-off; pint-sized; pint-size; runty.
  • adjective satellite cut short
    sawed-off; shortened.
    • a sawed-off shotgun
    • a sawed-off broomstick
    • the shortened rope was easier to use
WordNet

scare off

  • verb cause to lose courage
    scare away; frighten off; dash; pall; daunt; scare; frighten away.
    • dashed by the refusal
WordNet

scratch off

  • verb write quickly
    fling off; dash off; knock off; scratch off.
    • She dashed off a note to her husband saying she would not be home for supper
    • He scratched off a thank-you note to the hostess
WordNet

screen off

  • verb partition by means of a divider, such as a screen
    screen off.
    • screen off this part of the room
WordNet

seal off

  • verb make tight; secure against leakage
    seal.
    • seal the windows
  • verb impose a blockade on
    blockade.
WordNet

sell off

  • verb get rid of by selling, usually at reduced prices
    • The store sold off the surplus merchandise
WordNet

send off

  • verb send away towards a designated goal
    despatch; dispatch.
  • verb throw, send, or cast forward
    project.
    • project a missile
  • verb transfer
    get off; send.
    • The spy sent the classified information off to Russia
WordNet

send-off

  • noun an organized expression of goodwill at the start of a trip or new venture
    bon voyage.
  • noun a start given to contestants
    send-off; kickoff.
    • I was there with my parents at the kickoff
WordNet

separate off

  • verb partition by means of a divider, such as a screen
    screen off.
    • screen off this part of the room
WordNet

set off

  • verb put in motion or move to act
    activate; touch off; actuate; set off; trigger; spark off; spark; trip.
    • trigger a reaction
    • actuate the circuits
  • verb leave
    depart; set forth; set off; start out; start; part; set out.
    • The family took off for Florida
  • verb direct attention to, as if by means of contrast
    bring out.
    • This dress accentuates your nice figure!
    • I set off these words by brackets
  • verb cause to burst with a violent release of energy
    explode; detonate; blow up.
    • We exploded the nuclear bomb
  • verb make up for
    cancel; offset.
    • His skills offset his opponent's superior strength
  • verb set in motion or cause to begin
    • The guide set the tour off to a good start
  • verb provoke or stir up
    incite; instigate; stir up.
    • incite a riot
    • set off great unrest among the people
WordNet

set-off

Set"-off` noun
Etymology
Set + off.
Definitions
  1. That which is set off against another thing; an offset.
    I do not contemplate such a heroine as a set-off to the many sins imputed to me as committed against woman. D. Jerrold.
  2. That which is used to improve the appearance of anything; a decoration; an ornament.
  3. (Law) A counterclaim; a cross debt or demand; a distinct claim filed or set up by the defendant against the plaintiff's demand. Set-off differs from recoupment, as the latter generally grows out of the same matter or contract with the plaintiff's claim, while the former grows out of distinct matter, and does not of itself deny the justice of the plaintiff's demand. Offset is sometimes improperly used for the legal term set-off. See Recoupment.
  4. (Arch.) Same as Offset, n., 4.
  5. (Print.) See Offset, 7. Syn. -- Set-off, Offset. -- Offset originally denoted that which branches off or projects, as a shoot from a tree, but the term has long been used in America in the sense of set-off. This use is beginning to obtain in England; though Macaulay uses set-off, and so, perhaps, do a majority of English writers.
Webster 1913

shade off

  • verb cast a shadow over
    shadow; shade.
WordNet

shake off

  • verb get rid of
    shake off; escape from; shake.
    • I couldn't shake the car that was following me
  • verb get rid of
    shake off; shed; throw away; drop; cast off; cast; throw.
    • he shed his image as a pushy boss
    • shed your clothes
WordNet

shoo off

  • verb drive away by crying `shoo!'
    shoo away; shoo.
WordNet

shoot one's mouth off

  • verb speak spontaneously and without restraint
    lip off.
    • She always shoots her mouth off and says things she later regrets
WordNet

shove off

  • verb leave; informal or rude
    blow; shove along.
    • shove off!
    • The children shoved along
    • Blow now!
WordNet

show off

  • verb display proudly; act ostentatiously or pretentiously
    swank; flash; flaunt; ostentate.
    • he showed off his new sports car
WordNet

show-off

  • noun someone who deliberately behaves in such a way as to attract attention
    exhibitionist.
WordNet

shrug off

  • verb minimize the importance of, brush aside
    • Jane shrugged off the news that her stock had fallen 3 points
WordNet

shut off

  • verb stem the flow of
    close off.
    • shut off the gas when you leave for a vacation
  • verb isolate or separate
    close off.
    • She was shut off from the friends
  • verb block off the passage through
    block off; close off.
    • We shut off the valve
WordNet

sign off

  • verb cease broadcasting; get off the air; as of radio stations
WordNet

siphon off

  • verb convey, draw off, or empty by or as if by a siphon
    siphon; syphon.
WordNet

skim off

  • verb remove from the surface
    cream off; skim; cream.
    • skim cream from the surface of milk
  • verb pick the best
    cream off.
WordNet

slack off

  • verb become less in amount or intensity
    die away; slack; abate; let up.
    • The storm abated
    • The rain let up after a few hours
WordNet

slacken off

  • verb become less intense
    ease up; flag; ease off.
WordNet

sleep off

  • verb get rid of by sleeping
    • sleep off a hangover
WordNet

slip off

  • verb take off with ease or speed
    • She slipped off her jacket
WordNet

slough off

  • verb discard as undesirable
    • the candidate sloughed off his former campaign workers
  • verb separate from surrounding living tissue, as in an abortion
WordNet

snap off

  • verb break a piece from a whole
    break; break off.
    • break a branch from a tree
WordNet

sneak off

  • verb leave furtively and stealthily
    steal away; sneak away; sneak out; slip away.
    • The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard
WordNet

snip off

  • verb sever or remove by pinching or snipping
    snip; nip; nip off; clip.
    • nip off the flowers
WordNet

sound off

  • verb express one's opinion openly and without fear or hesitation
    speak up; animadvert; opine; speak out.
    • John spoke up at the meeting
  • verb start playing
    strike up.
    • The musicians struck up a tune
  • verb express complaints, discontent, displeasure, or unhappiness
    plain; kvetch; kick; complain; quetch.
    • My mother complains all day
    • She has a lot to kick about
WordNet

spark off

  • verb put in motion or move to act
    activate; touch off; actuate; set off; trigger; spark off; spark; trip.
    • trigger a reaction
    • actuate the circuits
WordNet

spiel off

  • verb recite volubly or extravagantly
    rattle down; roll off; reel off; rattle off.
    • He could recite the names of all the chemical elements
WordNet

spin off

  • verb produce as a consequence of something larger
WordNet

spin-off

  • noun a product made during the manufacture of something else
    byproduct; by-product.
WordNet

spirit off

  • verb carry off mysteriously; as if by magic
    spirit away.
WordNet

sponge off

  • verb clean with a sponge, by rubbing
    sponge down.
WordNet

square off

  • verb settle conclusively; come to terms
    determine; settle; square up.
    • We finally settled the argument
WordNet

Standing off

  • (Naut.), sailing from the land.
Webster 1913

start-off

  • noun a start given to contestants
    send-off; kickoff.
    • I was there with my parents at the kickoff
WordNet

stave off

  • verb prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening
    stave off; avert; debar; avoid; deflect; obviate; head off; forefend; fend off; forfend.
    • Let's avoid a confrontation
    • head off a confrontation
    • avert a strike
WordNet

stay off

  • verb refrain from entering or walking onto
    keep off.
    • keep off the grass
    • stay off the premises
WordNet

straight off

  • adverb without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    straightaway; forthwith; like a shot; at once; directly; right away; immediately; now; instantly.
    • he answered immediately
    • found an answer straightaway
    • an official accused of dishonesty should be suspended forthwith
    • Come here now!
WordNet

strike off

  • verb remove from a list
    strike out; mark; cross out; cross off.
    • Cross the name of the dead person off the list
WordNet

swear off

  • verb promise to abstain from
    • I have sworn off cigarettes altogether
WordNet

sweat off

  • verb lose weight by sweating
    • I sweated off 3 pounds in the sauna
WordNet

sweep off

  • verb overwhelm emotionally
    sweep away.
    • Her swept her away
WordNet

switch off

  • verb cause to stop operating by disengaging a switch
    switch off; cut; turn out.
    • Turn off the stereo, please
    • cut the engine
    • turn out the lights
WordNet

take off

  • verb leave
    depart; set forth; set off; start out; start; part; set out.
    • The family took off for Florida
  • verb take away or remove
    • Take that weight off me!
  • verb depart from the ground
    lift off.
    • The plane took off two hours late
  • verb take time off from work; stop working temporarily
    take off.
  • verb mimic or imitate in an amusing or satirical manner
    • This song takes off from a famous aria
  • verb remove clothes
    • take off your shirt--it's very hot in here
  • verb get started or set in motion, used figuratively
    get off the ground.
    • the project took a long time to get off the ground
  • verb prove fatal
    • The disease took off
  • verb make a subtraction
    deduct; subtract.
    • subtract this amount from my paycheck
WordNet

take time off

  • verb take time off from work; stop working temporarily
    take off.
WordNet

take-off

Take"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. An imitation, especially in the way of caricature.
Webster 1913

taking-off

Tak"ing-off` noun
Definitions
  1. Removal; murder. See To take off (c), under Take, v. t.
    The deep damnation of his taking-off. Shak.
Webster 1913

tap-off

  • noun the act of starting a basketball game with a jump ball
    tap-off.
WordNet

taper off

  • verb end weakly
    peter out; fizzle; fizzle out.
    • The music just petered out--there was no proper ending
  • verb become smaller or less active
    • Business tapered off
WordNet

tapering off

  • adjective satellite gradually decreasing until little remains
    dwindling; tapering.
WordNet

tax write-off

  • noun a reduction in the gross amount on which a tax is calculated; reduces taxes by the percentage fixed for the taxpayer's income bracket
    deduction; tax deduction.
WordNet

tear off

  • verb rip off violently and forcefully
    tear away.
    • The passing bus tore off her side mirror
WordNet

tee off

  • verb strike a ball from the teeing ground at the start of a hole
WordNet

tell off

  • verb reprimand
    brush down.
    • She told the misbehaving student off
WordNet

throw off

  • verb get rid of
    shake off; shed; throw away; drop; cast off; cast; throw.
    • he shed his image as a pushy boss
    • shed your clothes
  • verb get rid of
    shake off; escape from; shake.
    • I couldn't shake the car that was following me
WordNet

throw-off

Throw"-off` noun
Definitions
  1. A start in a hunt or a race. Eng.
Webster 1913

tick off

  • verb put a check mark on or near or next to
    mark off; check off; mark; tick; check.
    • Please check each name on the list
    • tick off the items
    • mark off the units
WordNet

time off

  • noun a time period when you are not required to work
    • he requested time off to attend his grandmother's funeral
WordNet

tip off

  • verb give insider information or advise to
    tip.
    • He tipped off the police about the terrorist plot
WordNet

tip-off

  • noun inside information that something is going to happen
  • noun the act of starting a basketball game with a jump ball
    tap-off.
WordNet

To be better off

  • to be in a better condition.
Webster 1913

To be ill off, To be badly off

  • to be in poor condition.
Webster 1913

To be off

  • . (a) To depart; to escape; as, he was off without a moment's warning. (b) To be abandoned, as an agreement or purpose; as, the bet was declared to be off. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To be off color

  • to be of a wrong color. to be mildly obscene
Webster 1913

To be off one's food

  • to have no appetite. (Colloq.)
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To be off one's rocker

  • to be insane.
Webster 1913

To be off the hinges

  • to be in a state of disorder or irregularity; to have lost proper adjustment.
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To be well off

  • to be in good condition.
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To bear off

  • . (a) To restrain; to keep from approach. (b) (Naut.) To remove to a distance; to keep clear from rubbing against anything; as, to bear off a blow; to bear off a boat. (c) To gain; to carry off, as a prize.
  • (Naut.), to steer away, as from land.
Webster 1913

To beat off

  • to repel or drive back.
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To blow off

  • to empty (a boiler) of water through the blow-off pipe, while under steam pressure; also, to eject (steam, water, sediment, etc.) from a boiler.
  • to let steam escape through a passage provided for the purpose; as, the engine or steamer is blowing off.
Webster 1913

To box off

  • to divide into tight compartments.
  • (Naut.), to turn the head of a vessel either way by bracing the headyards aback.
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To branch off

  • to form a branch or a separate part; to diverge.
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To break off

  • . (a) To become separated by rupture, or with suddenness and violence. (b) To desist or cease suddenly. "Nay, forward, old man; do not break off so." Shak.
  • . (a) To separate by breaking; as, to break off a twig. (b) To stop suddenly; to abandon. "Break off thy sins by righteousness." Dan. iv. 27.
Webster 1913

To break off from

  • to desist from; to abandon, as a habit.
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To bring off

  • to bear or convey away; to clear from condemnation; to cause to escape.
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To bundle off

  • to send off in a hurry, or without ceremony.
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To buy off

  • . (a) To influence to compliance; to cause to bend or yield by some consideration; as, to buy off conscience. (b) To detach by a consideration given; as, to buy off one from a party.
Webster 1913

To call off

  • to summon away; to divert; as, to call off the attention; to call off workmen from their employment.
Webster 1913

To carry off

  • (a) To remove to a distance. (b) To bear away as from the power or grasp of others. (c) To remove from life; as, the plague carried off thousands.
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To cast off

  • . (a) To discard or reject; to drive away; to put off; to free one's self from. (b) (Hunting) To leave behind, as dogs; also, to set loose, or free, as dogs. Crabb. (c) (Naut.) To untie, throw off, or let go, as a rope.
Webster 1913

To cast off copy

  • (Print.), to estimate how much printed matter a given amount of copy will make, or how large the page must be in order that the copy may make a given number of pages.
Webster 1913

To choke off

  • to stop a person in the execution of a purpose; as, to choke off a speaker by uproar.
Webster 1913

To claw off

  • (Naut.), to turn to windward and beat, to prevent falling on a lee shore.
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To come off

  • . (a) To depart or pass off from. (b) To get free; to get away; to escape. (c) To be carried through; to pass off; as, it came off well. (d) To acquit one's self; to issue from (a contest, etc.); as, he came off with honor; hence, substantively, a come off, an escape; an excuse; an evasion. Colloq. (e) To pay over; to give. Obs. (f) To take place; to happen; as, when does the race come off? (g) To be or become after some delay; as, the weather came off very fine. (h) To slip off or be taken off, as a garment; to separate. (i) To hurry away; to get through. Chaucer.
Webster 1913

To come off, To cut off, To fall off, To go off

  • etc. See under Come, Cut, Fall, Go, etc.
Webster 1913

To come off by

  • to suffer . Obs. "To come off by the worst." Calamy.
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To come off from

  • to leave. "To come off from these grave disquisitions." Felton.
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To come off with flying colors

  • to be victorious; to succeed thoroughly in an undertaking.
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To cut off

  • . (a) To sever; to separate.
    I would to God, . . . The king had cut off my brother's. Shak.
    (b) To put an untimely death; to put an end to; to destroy. "Irenus was likewise cut off by martyrdom." Addison. (c) To interrupt; as, to cut off communication; to cut off (the flow of) steam from (the boiler to) a steam engine. (d) To intercept; as,, to cut off an enemy's retreat. (e) To end; to finish; as, to cut off further debate.
Webster 1913

To declare off

  • to recede from an agreement, undertaking, contract, etc.; to renounce.
Webster 1913

To draw off

  • to withdraw; to abstract. Addison.
Webster 1913

To drink offup

  • to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial.
Webster 1913

To drop off

  • to fall asleep gently; also, to die. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To ease off, To ease away

  • (Naut.), to slacken a rope gradually.
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To edge awayoff

  • (Naut.), to increase the distance gradually from the shore, vessel, or other object.
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To fall off

  • . (a) To drop; as, fruits fall off when ripe. (b) To withdraw; to separate; to become detached; as, friends fall off in adversity. "Love cools, friendship falls off, brothers divide." Shak. (c) To perish; to die away; as, words fall off by disuse. (d) To apostatize; to forsake; to withdraw from the faith, or from allegiance or duty.
    Those captive tribes . . . fell offFrom God to worship calves.Milton.
    (e) To forsake; to abandon; as, his customers fell off. (f) To depreciate; to change for the worse; to deteriorate; to become less valuable, abundant, or interesting; as, a falling off in the wheat crop; the magazine or the review falls off. "O Hamlet, what a falling off was there!" Shak. (g) (Naut.) To deviate or trend to the leeward of the point to which the head of the ship was before directed; to fall to leeward.
Webster 1913

To fend off a boat ∨ vessel

  • (Naut.), to prevent its running against anything with too much violence.
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To fling off

  • to baffle in the chase; to defeat of prey; also, to get rid of. Addison.
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To fly off

  • to separate, or become detached suddenly; to revolt.
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To fob off

  • to shift off by an artifice; to put aside; to delude with a trick."A conspiracy of bishops could prostrate and fob off the right of the people."
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To get off

  • . (a) To utter; to discharge; as, to get off a joke. (b) To go away; to escape; as, to get off easily from a trial . Colloq.
Webster 1913

To give off

  • to emit, as steam, vapor, odor, etc.
  • to cease; to forbear. Obs. Locke.
Webster 1913

To go off

  • . (a) To go away; to depart.
    The leaders . . . will not go off until they hear you. Shak.
    (b) To cease; to intermit; as, this sickness went off. (c) To die. Shak. (d) To explode or be discharged; said of gunpowder, of a gun, a mine, etc. (e) To find a purchaser; to be sold or disposed of. (f) To pass off; to take place; to be accomplished.
    The wedding went off much as such affairs do. Mrs. Caskell.
Webster 1913

To go off halfcocked

  • . (a) To be discharged prematurely, or with the trigger at half cock; said of a firearm. (b) To do or say something without due thought or care. Colloq. or Low
Webster 1913

To go off the hooks

  • to die. Colloq. Thackeray.
Webster 1913

To haul off

  • (Naut.), to sail closer to the wind, in order to get farther away from anything; hence, to withdraw; to draw back.
Webster 1913

To head off

  • to intercept; to get before; as, an officer heads off a thief who is escaping.
Webster 1913

To help off

  • to help to go or pass away, as time; to assist in removing. Locke.
Webster 1913

To hit off

  • to describe with quick characteristic strokes; as, to hit off a speaker. Sir W. Temple.
Webster 1913

To hold off

  • to keep at a distance.
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To knock off

  • to cease, as from work; to desist.
  • . (a) To force off by a blow or by beating. (b) To assign to a bidder at an auction, by a blow on the counter . (c) To leave off (work, etc.) . Colloq.
Webster 1913

To lead off ∨ out

  • to go first; to begin.
Webster 1913

To leave off

  • . (a) To desist from; to forbear; to stop; as, to leave off work at six o'clock . (b) To cease wearing or using; to omit to put in the usual position; as, to leave off a garment; to leave off the tablecloth . (c) To forsake; as, to leave off a bad habit.
  • to cease; to desist; to stop.
Webster 1913

To let off

  • (a) To discharge; to let fly, as an arrow; to fire the charge of, as a gun . (b) To release, as from an engagement or obligation . Colloq.
Webster 1913

To make off

  • to go away suddenly.
Webster 1913

To pair off

  • to separate from a company in pairs or couples; specif. (Parliamentary Cant), to agree with one of the opposite party or opinion to abstain from voting on specified questions or issues. See Pair, n., 6.
Webster 1913

To pass off

  • to go away; to cease; to disappear; as, an agitation passes off.
  • to impose fraudulently; to palm off. "Passed himself off as a bishop." Macaulay.
Webster 1913

To pay off

  • . (a) To make compensation to and discharge; as, to pay off the crew of a ship . (b) To allow (a thread, cord, etc.) to run off; to unwind.
  • . Etymol. uncertain. (Naut.) To fall to leeward, as the head of a vessel under sail.
Webster 1913

To pick off

  • . (a) To pluck; to remove by picking . (b) To shoot or bring down, one by one; as, sharpshooters pick off the enemy.
Webster 1913

To play off

  • to affect; to feign; to practice artifice.
  • to display; to show; to put in exercise; as, to play off tricks.
Webster 1913

to pluck off

  • to pull or tear off; as, to pluck off the skin.
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To point off

  • to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures.
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To polish off

  • to finish completely, as an adversary. Slang
Webster 1913

To pop off

  • to thrust away, or put off promptly; as, to pop one off with a denial. Locke.
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To post off

  • to put off; to delay. Obs. "Why did I, venturously, post off so great a business?" Baxter.
Webster 1913

To pull off

  • take or draw off. (b) to perform (something illegal or unethical); as, to pull off a heist [robbery]. (c) to accomplish, against the odds.
Webster 1913

To put off

  • . (a) To lay aside; to discard; as, to put off a robe; to put off mortality. "Put off thy shoes from off thy feet." Ex. iii. 5. (b) To turn aside; to elude; to disappoint; to frustrate; to baffle.
    I hoped for a demonstration, but Themistius hoped to put me off with an harangue. Boyle.
    We might put him off with this answer. Bentley.
    (c) To delay; to defer; to postpone; as, to put off repentance. (d) To get rid of; to dispose of; especially, to pass fraudulently; as, to put off a counterfeit note, or an ingenious theory = to pass off . (e) To push from land; as, to put off a boat .
  • to go away; to depart; esp., to leave land, as a ship; to move from the shore.
Webster 1913

To rattle off

  • . (a) To tell glibly or noisily; as, to rattle off a story . (b) To rail at; to scold .
    "She would sometimes rattle off her servants sharply."Arbuthnot.
Webster 1913

To rub off

  • to clean anything by rubbing; to separate by friction; as, to rub off rust.
Webster 1913

To run off

  • to cause to flow away, as a charge of molten metal from a furnace.
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To set off

  • . (a) To separate from a whole; to assign to a particular purpose; to portion off; as, to set off a portion of an estate. (b) To adorn; to decorate; to embellish .
    They . . . set off the worst faces with the best airs. Addison.
    (c) To give a flattering description of.
  • . (a) To enter upon a journey; to start . (b) (Typog.) To deface or soil the next sheet; said of the ink on a freshly printed sheet, when another sheet comes in contract with it before it has had time to dry.
Webster 1913

To set off against

  • to place against as an equivalent; as, to set off one man's services against another's.
Webster 1913

To sheer off

  • to turn or move aside to a distance; to move away.
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To shift off

  • to delay; to defer; to put off; to lay aside.
Webster 1913

To show off

  • to exhibit ostentatiously.
  • to make a show; to display one's self.
Webster 1913

To shuffe off

  • to push off; to rid one's self of.
Webster 1913

To shut off

  • . (a) To exclude . (b) To prevent the passage of, as steam through a pipe, or water through a flume, by closing a cock, valve, or gate.
Webster 1913

To sleep off

  • to become free from by sleep; as, to sleep off drunkeness or fatigue.
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To slight off

  • to treat slightingly; to drive off; to remove. R.
Webster 1913

To slip off

  • to take off quickly; as, to slip off a coat.
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To smite off

  • to cut off.
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To snap off

  • . (a) To break suddenly . (b) To bite off suddenly.
Webster 1913

To stand off

  • . (a) To keep at a distance . (b) Not to comply . (c) To keep at a distance in friendship, social intercourse, or acquaintance . (d) To appear prominent; to have relief . "Picture is best when it standeth off, as if it were carved." Sir H. Wotton.
Webster 1913

To stand off and on

  • (Naut.), to remain near a coast by sailing toward land and then from it.
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To step off

  • to measure by steps, or paces; hence, to divide, as a space, or to form a series of marks, by successive measurements, as with dividers.
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To stop off

  • (Founding), to fill (a part of a mold) with sand, where a part of the cavity left by the pattern is not wanted for the casting.
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To strike off

  • . (a) To erase from an account; to deduct; as, to strike off the interest of a debt . (b) (Print.) To impress; to print; as, to strike off a thousand copies of a book . = to run off? [copies] (c) To separate by a blow or any sudden action; as, to strike off what is superfluous or corrupt.
Webster 1913

To swear off

  • to make a solemn vow, or a serious resolution, to abstain from something; as, to swear off smoking. Slang
Webster 1913

To take off

  • . (a) To remove, as from the surface or outside; to remove from the top of anything; as, to take off a load; to take off one's hat. (b) To cut off; as, to take off the head, or a limb . (c) To destroy; as, to take off life . (d) To remove; to invalidate; as, to take off the force of an argument . (e) To withdraw; to call or draw away . Locke. (f) To swallow; as, to take off a glass of wine. (g) To purchase; to take in trade . "The Spaniards having no commodities that we will take off." Locke. (h) To copy; to reproduce. "Take off all their models in wood." Addison. (i) To imitate; to mimic; to personate. (k) To find place for; to dispose of; as, more scholars than preferments can take off. R. Bacon. to begin to fly; said of an airplane, or of a person operating an airplane or other flying device.
  • to mimic or personate. also, to take off on, to do a take-off on
Webster 1913

To tear off

  • to pull off by violence; to strip.
Webster 1913

To tell off

  • to count; to divide. Sir W. Scott.
  • (Mil.), to divide and practice a regiment or company in the several formations, preparatory to marching to the general parade for field exercises. Farrow. (b) to criticise
Webster 1913

To throw off

  • . (a) To expel; to free one's self from; as, to throw off a disease. (b) To reject; to discard; to abandon; as, to throw off all sense of shame; to throw off a dependent. (c) To make a start in a hunt or race. Eng. (d) To emit. Same as throw out (e). (e) To disconcert or confuse. Same as to throw out (f).
Webster 1913

To thrust off

  • to push away.
Webster 1913

To tip off

  • to pour out, as liquor.
  • to fall off by tipping.
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To top off

  • to complete by putting on, or finishing, the top or uppermost part of; as, to top off a stack of hay; hence, to complete; to finish; to adorn.
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To toss off

  • to drink hastily.
Webster 1913

To turn off

  • to be diverted; to deviate from a course; as, the road turns off to the left.
  • . (a) To dismiss contemptuously; as, to turn off a sycophant or a parasite. (b) To give over; to reduce. (c) To divert; to deflect; as, to turn off the thoughts from serious subjects; to turn off a joke. (d) To accomplish; to perform, as work. (e) (Mech.) To remove, as a surface, by the process of turning; to reduce in size by turning. (f) To shut off, as a fluid, by means of a valve, stopcock, or other device; to stop the passage of; as, to turn off the water or the gas. (g) (colloq.) To dampen the enthusiasm of.
Webster 1913

To wear off

  • to diminish or remove by attrition or slow decay; as, to wear off the nap of cloth.
  • to pass away by degrees; as, the follies of youth wear off with age.
Webster 1913

To whistle off

  • . (a) To dismiss by a whistle; a term in hawking. "AS a long-winged hawk when he is first whistled off the fist, mounts aloft." Burton. (b) Hence, in general, to turn loose; to abandon; to dismiss.
Webster 1913

To wind off

  • to unwind; to uncoil.
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To work off

  • to remove gradually, as by labor, or a gradual process; as, beer works off impurities in fermenting.
Webster 1913

top off

  • verb finish up or conclude
    top.
    • They topped off their dinner with a cognac
    • top the evening with champagne
  • verb fill to the point of almost overflowing
    • She topped off the cup
WordNet

toss off

  • verb write quickly
    fling off; dash off; knock off; scratch off.
    • She dashed off a note to her husband saying she would not be home for supper
    • He scratched off a thank-you note to the hostess
  • verb drink down entirely
    drink down; bolt down; pour down; pop; belt down; down; kill.
    • He downed three martinis before dinner
    • She killed a bottle of brandy that night
    • They popped a few beer after work
WordNet

touch off

  • verb put in motion or move to act
    activate; touch off; actuate; set off; trigger; spark off; spark; trip.
    • trigger a reaction
    • actuate the circuits
WordNet

trade-off

  • noun an exchange that occurs as a compromise
    tradeoff.
    • I faced a tradeoff between eating and buying my medicine
WordNet

trigger off

  • verb put in motion or move to act
    activate; touch off; actuate; set off; trigger; spark off; spark; trip.
    • trigger a reaction
    • actuate the circuits
WordNet

turn off

  • verb cause to stop operating by disengaging a switch
    switch off; cut; turn out.
    • Turn off the stereo, please
    • cut the engine
    • turn out the lights
  • verb make a turn
    • turn off at the parking area
  • verb cause to feel intense dislike or distaste
    put off.
WordNet

walk off

  • verb take without permission
    • he walked off with my wife!
    • The thief walked off with my gold watch
  • verb go away from
    walk away.
    • The actor walked off before he got his cue
    • I got annoyed and just walked off
WordNet

ward off

  • verb prevent the occurrence of; prevent from happening
    stave off; avert; debar; avoid; deflect; obviate; head off; forefend; fend off; forfend.
    • Let's avoid a confrontation
    • head off a confrontation
    • avert a strike
  • verb avert, turn away, or repel
    • Ward off danger
WordNet

wash off

  • verb remove by the application of water or other liquid and soap or some other cleaning agent
    wash; wash away; wash out.
    • he washed the dirt from his coat
    • The nurse washed away the blood
    • Can you wash away the spots on the windows?
    • he managed to wash out the stains
WordNet

wash-off

Wash"-off` adjective
Definitions
  1. (Calico Printing) Capable of being washed off; not permanent or durable; -- said of colors not fixed by steaming or otherwise.
Webster 1913

wave off

  • verb dismiss as insignificant
    • He waved off suggestions of impropriety
WordNet

wave-off

  • noun an approach that fails and gives way to another attempt
    go-around; overshoot.
WordNet

wear off

  • verb deteriorate through use or stress
    wear out; wear down; wear thin; wear.
    • The constant friction wore out the cloth
  • verb diminish, as by friction
    wear away.
    • Erosion wore away the surface
WordNet

Well off

  • in good condition; especially, in good condition as to property or any advantages; thriving; prosperous.
Webster 1913

well-off

  • adjective satellite in fortunate circumstances financially; moderately rich
    well-to-do; prosperous; well-heeled; comfortable; well-fixed; well-situated; easy.
    • they were comfortable or even wealthy by some standards
    • easy living
    • a prosperous family
    • his family is well-situated financially
    • well-to-do members of the community
  • adjective satellite fortunately situated
    • doesn't know when he's well-off
WordNet

whisk off

  • verb brush or wipe off lightly
    whisk.
  • verb take away quickly and suddenly
    whisk away.
WordNet

wind off

  • verb reverse the winding or twisting of
    unwind; unroll.
    • unwind a ball of yarn
WordNet

wipe off

  • verb remove by wiping
    wipe away.
  • verb remove by or as if by rubbing or erasing
    efface; score out; erase; rub out.
    • Please erase the formula on the blackboard--it is wrong!
WordNet

work off

  • verb cause to go away through effort or work
    • work off the extra pounds you have gained over the holidays
    • we must work off the debt
WordNet

write off

  • verb concede the loss or worthlessness of something or somebody
    • write it off as a loss
  • verb write something fluently, and without hesitation
  • verb cancel (a debt)
  • verb reduce the estimated value of something
    expense; write down.
    • For tax purposes you can write off the laser printer
WordNet

write-off

  • noun (accounting) reduction in the book value of an asset
    write-down.
  • noun the act of cancelling from an account a bad debt or a worthless asset
WordNet

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

Writing Improvement Software
Writing Improvement Software