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mood Idioms & Phrases


common mood

  • noun a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
    common mood; declarative mood; declarative; indicative; fact mood.
WordNet

Conjunctive mood

  • (Gram.), the mood which follows a conjunction or expresses contingency; the subjunctive mood.
Webster 1913

declarative mood

  • noun a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
    common mood; declarative mood; declarative; indicative; fact mood.
WordNet

fact mood

  • noun a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
    common mood; declarative mood; declarative; indicative; fact mood.
WordNet

imperative mood

  • noun a mood that expresses an intention to influence the listener's behavior
    imperative form; imperative; imperative mood.
WordNet

Indicative mood

  • noun a mood (grammatically unmarked) that represents the act or state as an objective fact
    common mood; declarative mood; declarative; indicative; fact mood.
WordNet
  • (Gram.), that mood or form of the verb which indicates, that is, which simply affirms or denies or inquires; as, he writes; he is not writing; has the mail arrived?
Webster 1913

Infinitive mood

  • (Gram.), that form of the verb which merely names the action, and performs the office of a verbal noun. Some grammarians make two forms in English: (a) The simple form, as, speak, go, hear, before which to is commonly placed, as, to speak; to go; to hear. (b) The form of the imperfect participle, called the infinitive in -ing; as, going is as easy as standing.
Webster 1913

interrogative mood

  • noun some linguists consider interrogative sentences to constitute a mood
    interrogative.
WordNet

jussive mood

  • noun a mood that expresses an intention to influence the listener's behavior
    imperative form; imperative; imperative mood.
WordNet

Optative mood

  • noun a mood (as in Greek or Sanskrit) that expresses a wish or hope; expressed in English by modal verbs
    optative.
WordNet
  • (Gram.), that mood or form of a verb, as in Greek, Sanskrit, etc., in which a wish or desire is expressed.
Webster 1913

Potential mood, ∨ mode

  • (Gram.), that form of the verb which is used to express possibility, liberty, power, will, obligation, or necessity, by the use of may, can, must, might, could, would, or should; as, I may go; he can write.
Webster 1913

Subjunctive mood

  • noun a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
    subjunctive.
WordNet
  • (Gram.), that form of a verb which express the action or state not as a fact, but only as a conception of the mind still contingent and dependent. It is commonly subjoined, or added as subordinate, to some other verb, and in English is often connected with it by if, that, though, lest, unless, except, until, etc., as in the following sentence: "If there were no honey, they [bees] would have no object in visiting the flower." Lubbock. In some languages, as in Latin and Greek, the subjunctive is often independent of any other verb, being used in wishes, commands, exhortations, etc.
Webster 1913