light Idioms & Phrases


Accidental lights

  • (Paint.), secondary lights; effects of light other than ordinary daylight, such as the rays of the sun darting through a cloud, or between the leaves of trees; the effect of moonlight, candlelight, or burning bodies.
Webster 1913

anchor light

  • noun a light in the rigging of a ship that is riding at anchor
    riding lamp; anchor light.
WordNet

Ancient lights

  • (Law), windows and other openings which have been enjoined without molestation for more than twenty years. In England, and in some of the United States, they acquire a prescriptive right.
Webster 1913

Ancient lights (Law), Calcium light, Flash light, etc.

  • See under Ancient, Calcium, etc.
Webster 1913

arc light

  • noun a lamp that produces light when electric current flows across the gap between two electrodes
    arc lamp.
WordNet

Artificial light

  • any light other than that which proceeds from the heavenly bodies.
Webster 1913

Batement light

  • (Arch.), a window or one division of a window having vertical sides, but with the sill not horizontal, as where it follows the rake of a staircase.
Webster 1913

beacon light

  • noun a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing ships
    pharos; beacon; lighthouse.
WordNet

beam of light

  • noun a column of light (as from a beacon)
    shaft; ray of light; irradiation; beam; beam of light; light beam; ray.
WordNet

Bengal light

  • noun a steady bright blue light; formerly used as a signal but now a firework
WordNet
  • a firework containing niter, sulphur, and antimony, and producing a sustained and vivid colored light, used in making signals and in pyrotechnics; called also blue light.
Webster 1913

Blue light

  • a composition which burns with a brilliant blue flame; used in pyrotechnics and as a night signal at sea, and in military operations.
Webster 1913

Bracket light

  • a gas fixture or a lamp attached to a wall, column, etc.
Webster 1913

brake light

  • noun a red light on the rear of a motor vehicle that signals when the brakes are applied to slow or stop
    stoplight.
WordNet

bude light

Bude" light`

Etymology
From Bude, in Cornwall, the residence of Sir G.Gurney, the inventor.
Definitions
  1. A light in which high illuminating power is obtained by introducing a jet of oxygen gas or of common air into the center of a flame fed with coal gas or with oil.
Webster 1913

Calcium light

  • noun a lamp consisting of a flame directed at a cylinder of lime with a lens to concentrate the light; formerly used for stage lighting
    limelight.
WordNet
  • an intense light produced by the incandescence of a stick or ball of lime in the flame of a combination of oxygen and hydrogen gases, or of oxygen and coal gas; called also Drummond light.
Webster 1913

Carbon light

  • (Elec.), an extremely brilliant electric light produced by passing a galvanic current through two carbon points kept constantly with their apexes neary in contact.
Webster 1913

Catoptric light

  • a light in which the rays are concentrated by reflectors into a beam visible at a distance.
Webster 1913

cigar lighter

  • noun a lighter for cigars or cigarettes
    cigar lighter; cigarette lighter.
WordNet

cigarette lighter

  • noun a lighter for cigars or cigarettes
    cigar lighter; cigarette lighter.
WordNet

city of light

  • noun the capital and largest city of France; and international center of culture and commerce
    Paris; French capital; capital of France.
WordNet

Cockshut timelight

  • evening twilight; nightfall; so called in allusion to the tome at which the cockshut used to be spread. Obs.
Webster 1913

come to light

  • verb be revealed or disclosed
    come to hand.
    • The truth finally came to light
WordNet

corpuscular theory of light

  • noun (physics) the theory that light is transmitted as a stream of particles
    corpuscular theory.
WordNet

Decomposition of light

  • the division of light into the prismatic colors.
Webster 1913

Depolarization of light

  • (Opt.), a change in the plane of polarization of rays, especially by a crystalline medium, such that the light which had been extinguished by the analyzer reappears as if the polarization had been anulled. The word is inappropriate, as the ray does not return to the unpolarized condition.
Webster 1913

drummond light

Drum"mond light`

Etymology
From Thomas Drummond, a British naval officer.
Definitions
  1. A very intense light, produced by turning two streams of gas, one oxygen and the other hydrogen, or coal gas, in a state of ignition, upon a ball of lime; or a stream of oxygen gas through a flame of alcohol upon a ball or disk of lime; -- called also oxycalcium light, or lime light. ✍ The name is also applied sometimes to a heliostat, invented by Drummond, for rendering visible a distant point, as in geodetic surveying, by reflecting upon it a beam of light from the sun.
Webster 1913

Dry light

  • pure unobstructed light; hence, a clear, impartial view. Bacon.
    The scientific man must keep his feelings under stern control, lest they obtrude into his researches, and color the dry light in which alone science desires to see its objects. J. C. Shairp.
Webster 1913

Earth light

  • (Astron.), the light reflected by the earth, as upon the moon, and corresponding to moonlight; called also earth shine. Sir J. Herschel.
Webster 1913

electric light

  • noun electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity
    lightbulb; electric light; electric-light bulb; bulb; incandescent lamp.
WordNet

electric-light bulb

  • noun electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity
    lightbulb; electric light; electric-light bulb; bulb; incandescent lamp.
WordNet

Electrical light

  • the light produced by a current of electricity which in passing through a resisting medium heats it to incandescence or burns it. See under Carbon.
Webster 1913

Electro-magnetic theory of light

  • (Physics), a theory of light which makes it consist in the rapid alternation of transient electric currents moving transversely to the direction of the ray.
Webster 1913

fairy light

  • noun a small colored light used for decoration (especially at Christmas)
WordNet

Fan light

  • (Arch.), a window over a door; so called from the semicircular form and radiating sash bars of those windows which are set in the circular heads of arched doorways.
Webster 1913

feast of lights

  • noun (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    Channukah; Feast of Dedication; Channukkah; Chanukkah; Hanukkah; Feast of the Dedication; Feast of Lights; Hannukah; Chanukah; Hanukah.
WordNet

festival of lights

  • noun (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of the Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    Channukah; Feast of Dedication; Channukkah; Chanukkah; Hanukkah; Feast of the Dedication; Feast of Lights; Hannukah; Chanukah; Hanukah.
WordNet

first light

  • noun the first light of day
    sunup; daybreak; break of day; dawning; aurora; morning; break of the day; dayspring; dawn; cockcrow; sunrise.
    • we got up before dawn
    • they talked until morning
WordNet

Fixed light

  • one which emits constant beams; distinguished from a flashing, revolving, or intermittent light.
Webster 1913

Flash light, ∨ Flashing light

  • a kind of light shown by lighthouses, produced by the revolution of reflectors, so as to show a flash of light every few seconds, alternating with periods of dimness. Knight.
Webster 1913

Floating light

  • a light shown at the masthead of a vessel moored over sunken rocks, shoals, etc., to warn mariners of danger; a light-ship; also, a light erected on a buoy or floating stage.
Webster 1913

Floor light

  • a frame with glass panes in a floor.
Webster 1913

green light

  • noun a signal to proceed
    go-ahead.
  • noun permission to proceed with a project or to take action
    • the gave the green light for construction to begin
WordNet

guiding light

  • noun a celebrity who is an inspiration to others
    luminary; notable; guiding light; notability.
    • he was host to a large gathering of luminaries
WordNet

half-light

  • noun a greyish light (as at dawn or dusk or in dim interiors)
WordNet

idiot light

  • noun a colored warning light on an instrument panel (as for low oil pressure)
WordNet

Incandescent lamplight

  • (Elec.), a kind of lamp in which the light is produced by a thin filament of conducting material, usually carbon usually tungsten! , contained in a vacuum, and heated to incandescence by an electric current, as in the Edison lamp; called also incandescence lamp, and glowlamp.
Webster 1913

indirect lighting

  • noun a concealed lighting fixture
WordNet

infrared light

  • noun electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths longer than visible light but shorter than radio waves
    infrared radiation; infrared emission; infrared.
WordNet

inner light

  • noun a divine presence believed by Quakers to enlighten and guide the soul
    Christ Within; Light; Inner Light.
WordNet

klieg light

  • noun carbon arc lamp that emits an intense light used in producing films
WordNet

leading light

  • noun a celebrity who is an inspiration to others
    luminary; notable; guiding light; notability.
    • he was host to a large gathering of luminaries
WordNet

light adaptation

  • noun the process of adjusting the eyes to relatively high levels of illumination; the pupil constricts and the cones system is operative
WordNet

light air

  • noun wind moving 1-3 knots; 1 on the Beaufort scale
WordNet

light arm

  • noun a rifle or pistol
WordNet

Light ball

  • (Mil.), a ball of combustible materials, used to afford light; sometimes made so as to fired from a cannon or mortar, or to be carried up by a rocket.
Webster 1913

light ballast

  • noun an electrical device for starting and regulating fluorescent and discharge lamps
    ballast.
WordNet

Light barrel

  • (Mil.), an empty power barrel pierced with holes and filled with shavings soaked in pitch, used to light up a ditch or a breach.
Webster 1913

light beam

  • noun a column of light (as from a beacon)
    shaft; ray of light; irradiation; beam; beam of light; light beam; ray.
WordNet

light beer

  • noun lager with reduced alcohol content
WordNet

light bread

  • noun bread made with finely ground and usually bleached wheat flour
    white bread.
WordNet

light breeze

  • noun wind moving 4-7 knots; 2 on the Beaufort scale
WordNet

light brown

  • noun a brown that is light but unsaturated
WordNet

light bulb

  • noun electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity
    lightbulb; electric light; electric-light bulb; bulb; incandescent lamp.
WordNet

Light cavalry, Light horse

  • (Mil.), light-armed soldiers mounted on strong and active horses.
Webster 1913

light circuit

  • noun wiring that provides power to electric lights
    light circuit.
WordNet

light colonel

  • noun a commissioned officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines holding a rank above major and below colonel
    lieutenant colonel.
WordNet

light company

  • noun a public utility that provides electricity
    power service; power company; electric company.
WordNet

light cream

  • noun cream that has at least 18% butterfat
    single cream; coffee cream.
    • in England they call light cream `single cream'
WordNet

light diet

  • noun diet prescribed for bedridden or convalescent people; does not include fried or highly seasoned foods
WordNet

Light dues

  • (Com.), tolls levied on ships navigating certain waters, for the maintenance of lighthouses.
Webster 1913

Light eater

  • one who eats but little.
Webster 1913

light filter

  • noun a transparent filter that reduces the light (or some wavelengths of the light) passing through it
    diffusing screen.
WordNet

light flyweight

  • noun an amateur boxer who weighs no more than 106 pounds
WordNet

light heavyweight

  • noun an amateur boxer who weighs no more than 179 pounds
  • noun a wrestler who weighs 192-214 pounds
  • noun a professional boxer who weighs between 169 and 175 pounds
    cruiserweight.
WordNet

light hour

  • noun the distance light travels in a vacuum in one hour; approximately one billion kilometers
WordNet

Light infantry

  • infantry soldiers selected and trained for rapid evolutions.
Webster 1913

light intensity

  • noun luminous intensity measured in candelas
    candlepower.
WordNet

Light iron

  • a candlestick. Obs.
Webster 1913

Light keeper

  • a person appointed to take care of a lighthouse or light-ship.
Webster 1913

light machine gun

  • noun a submachine gun not greater than .30 millimeter
WordNet

light meter

  • noun photographic equipment that measures the intensity of light
    exposure meter; photometer.
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light microscope

  • noun microscope consisting of an optical instrument that magnifies the image of an object
WordNet

light middleweight

  • noun an amateur boxer who weighs no more than 156 pounds
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light minute

  • noun the distance light travels in a vacuum in one minute; approximately 18 million kilometers
WordNet

Light money

  • charges laid by government on shipping entering a port, for the maintenance of lighthouses and light-ships.
Webster 1913

Light of foot

  • . (a) Having a light step. (b) Fleet.
Webster 1913

Light of heart

  • gay, cheerful.
Webster 1913

Light oil

  • (Chem. ), the oily product, lighter than water, forming the chief part of the first distillate of coal tar, and consisting largely of benzene and toluene.
Webster 1913

light opera

  • noun a short amusing opera
    operetta.
WordNet

light pen

  • noun (computer science) a pointer that when pointed at a computer display senses whether or not the spot is illuminated
    electronic stylus.
WordNet

light reaction

  • noun the first stage of photosynthesis during which energy from light is used for the production of ATP
WordNet

light reflex

  • noun reflex contraction of the sphincter muscle of the iris in response to a bright light (or certain drugs) causing the pupil to become smaller
    myosis; miosis; pupillary reflex.
WordNet

Light sails

  • (Naut.), all the sails above the topsails, with, also, the studding sails and flying jib. Dana.
Webster 1913

light second

  • noun the distance light travels in a vacuum in one second; approximately 300,000 kilometers
WordNet

light show

  • noun a display of colored lights moving in shifting patterns
WordNet

Light sleeper

  • one easily wakened.
Webster 1913

light source

  • noun any device serving as a source of illumination
    light.
    • he stopped the car and turned off the lights
WordNet

light speed

  • noun the speed at which light travels in a vacuum; the constancy and universality of the speed of light is recognized by defining it to be exactly 299,792,458 meters per second
    c; light speed.
WordNet

light time

  • noun distance measured in terms of the speed of light (or radio waves)
    • the light time from Jupiter to the sun is approximately 43 minutes
WordNet

light touch

  • noun momentary contact
    brush.
WordNet

light unit

  • noun a measure of the visible electromagnetic radiation
WordNet

light up

  • verb start to burn with a bright flame
    • The coal in the BBQ grill finally lit up
  • verb make lighter or brighter
    light; illuminate; illumine; illume.
    • This lamp lightens the room a bit
  • verb become clear
    clear up; clear; brighten.
    • The sky cleared after the storm
  • verb ignite
    • The sky lit up quickly above the raging volcano
  • verb begin to smoke
    light; fire up.
    • After the meal, some of the diners lit up
WordNet

light upon

  • verb find unexpectedly
    happen upon; fall upon; attain; come upon; chance upon; discover; come across; strike; chance on.
    • the archeologists chanced upon an old tomb
    • she struck a goldmine
    • The hikers finally struck the main path to the lake
WordNet

Light weight

  • a prize fighter, boxer, wrestler, or jockey, who is below a standard medium weight. Cf. Feather weight, under Feather. Cant
Webster 1913

light welterweight

  • noun an amateur boxer who weighs no more than 140 pounds
WordNet

light whipping cream

  • noun cream that has enough butterfat (30% to 36%) to be whipped
    whipping cream.
WordNet

light within

  • noun a divine presence believed by Quakers to enlighten and guide the soul
    Christ Within; Light; Inner Light.
WordNet

light year

  • noun the distance that light travels in a vacuum in 1 year; 5.88 trillion miles or 9.46 trillion kilometers
    light year.
WordNet

light-armed

  • adjective satellite armed with light weapons
    lightly-armed.
  • adjective satellite armed with light equipment and weapons
    • a light-armed brigade
WordNet

Light"-armed` adjective

Definitions
  1. Armed with light weapons or accouterments.
Webster 1913

light-blue

  • adjective satellite of a light shade of blue
    pale blue.
WordNet

light-boat

Light"-boat` noun

Definitions
  1. Light-ship.
Webster 1913

light-boned

  • adjective satellite having a bone structure that is light with respect to the surrounding flesh
WordNet

light-colored

  • adjective (used of color) having a relatively small amount of coloring agent
    light.
    • light blue
    • light colors such as pastels
    • a light-colored powder
WordNet

light-duty

  • adjective not designed for heavy work
    • a light-duty detergent
WordNet

light-emitting diode

  • noun diode such that light emitted at a p-n junction is proportional to the bias current; color depends on the material used
    LED.
WordNet

light-fingered

  • adjective satellite having nimble fingers literally or figuratively; especially for stealing or picking pockets
    nimble-fingered.
    • a light-fingered burglar who can crack the combination of a bank vault"- Harry Hansen
    • the light-fingered thoughtfulness...of the most civilized playwright of the era"- Time
WordNet

Light"-fin`gered adjective

Definitions
  1. Dexterous in taking and conveying away; thievish; pilfering; addicted to petty thefts. Fuller.
Webster 1913

light-foot

Light"-foot`, Light"-foot`ed adjective

Also
  • Light-foot
  • Light-footed
Definitions
  1. Having a light, springy step; nimble in running or dancing; active; as, light-foot Iris. Tennyson.
Webster 1913

light-footed

  • adjective (of movement) having a light and springy step
    • a light-footed girl
WordNet

Light"-foot`, Light"-foot`ed adjective

Also
  • Light-foot
  • Light-footed
Definitions
  1. Having a light, springy step; nimble in running or dancing; active; as, light-foot Iris. Tennyson.
Webster 1913

light-green

  • adjective satellite of the color between blue and yellow in the color spectrum; similar to the color of fresh grass
    dark-green; green; greenish.
    • a green tree
    • green fields
    • green paint
WordNet

light-haired

  • adjective being or having light colored skin and hair and usually blue or grey eyes
    blonde; blond.
    • blond Scandinavians
    • a house full of light-haired children
WordNet

light-handed

  • adjective satellite having a metaphorically delicate touch
    • the translation is...light-handed...and generally unobtrusive"- New Yorker
WordNet

Light"-hand`ed adjective

Definitions
  1. (Naut.) Not having a full complement of men; as, a vessel light-handed.
Webster 1913

light-handedly

  • adverb in a light-handed manner
WordNet

light-headed

  • adjective satellite weak and likely to lose consciousness
    light; swooning; faint; lightheaded.
    • suddenly felt faint from the pain
    • was sick and faint from hunger
    • felt light in the head
    • a swooning fit
    • light-headed with wine
    • light-headed from lack of sleep
  • adjective satellite lacking seriousness; given to frivolity
    giddy; featherbrained; airheaded; lightheaded; empty-headed; dizzy; silly.
    • a dizzy blonde
    • light-headed teenagers
    • silly giggles
WordNet

Light"-head`ed adjective

Definitions
  1. Disordered in the head; dilirious. Walpole.
  2. Thoughtless; heedless; volatile; unsteady; fickle; loose. "Light-headed, weak men." Clarendon. -- Light"-head`ed*ness, n.
Webster 1913

light-headedly

  • adverb in a giddy light-headed manner
    dizzily; giddily.
    • he walked around dizzily
WordNet

light-hearted

  • adjective satellite carefree and happy and lighthearted
    blithe; lightsome; blithesome; lighthearted.
    • was loved for her blithe spirit
    • a merry blithesome nature
    • her lighthearted nature
    • trilling songs with a lightsome heart
WordNet

Light"-heart"ed adjective

Definitions
  1. Free from grief or anxiety; gay; cheerful; merry. -- Light"-heart`ed*ly, adv. -- Light"-heart"ed*ness, n.
Webster 1913

light-heartedly

  • adverb in a light-hearted manner
    lightsomely.
    • he light-heartedly overlooks some of the basic facts of life
WordNet

light-heeled

Light"-heeled` adjective

Definitions
  1. Lively in walking or running; brisk; light-footed.
Webster 1913

light-horseman

Light"-horse`man noun

Wordforms
plural -men
Definitions
  1. A soldier who serves in the light horse. See under 5th Light.
  2. (Zoöl.) A West Indian fish of the genus Ephippus, remarkable for its high dorsal fin and brilliant colors.
Webster 1913

light-legged

Light"-legged` adjective

Definitions
  1. Nimble; swift of foot. Sir P. Sidney.
Webster 1913

light-minded

  • adjective satellite showing inappropriate levity
    flippant.
WordNet

Light"-mind`ed adjective

Definitions
  1. Unsettled; unsteady; volatile; not considerate. -- Light"-mind`ed*ness, n.
Webster 1913

light-mindedness

  • noun inappropriate levity
    flippancy.
    • her mood changed and she was all lightness and joy
WordNet

light-o'-love

  • noun a woman inconstant in love
    light-o'-love.
WordNet

Light"-o'-love` noun

Definitions
  1. An old tune of a dance, the name of which made it a proverbial expression of levity, especially in love matters. Nares. "Best sing it to the tune of light-o'-love." Shak.
  2. Hence: A light or wanton woman. Beau. & Fl.
Webster 1913

light-of-love

  • noun a woman inconstant in love
    light-o'-love.
WordNet

light-sensitive

  • adjective satellite sensitive to visible light
    photosensitive.
    • photographic film is light-sensitive
WordNet

light-ship

Light"-ship` noun

Definitions
  1. (Naut.) A vessel carrying at the masthead a brilliant light, and moored off a shoal or place of dangerous navigation as a guide for mariners.
Webster 1913

light-skinned

  • adjective satellite having little skin pigmentation
WordNet

light-tight

  • adjective satellite not penetrable by light
    lightproof.
    • lightproof containers
WordNet

light-winged

Light"-winged` adjective

Definitions
  1. Having light and active wings; volatile; fleeting. Shak.
Webster 1913

light-year

  • noun the distance that light travels in a vacuum in 1 year; 5.88 trillion miles or 9.46 trillion kilometers
    light year.
WordNet

lighter-than-air

  • adjective satellite relating to a balloon or other aircraft that flies because it weighs less than the air it displaces
WordNet

lighter-than-air craft

  • noun aircraft supported by its own buoyancy
WordNet

lighting circuit

  • noun wiring that provides power to electric lights
    light circuit.
WordNet

lighting fixture

  • noun a fixture providing artificial light
WordNet

lighting industry

  • noun an industry devoted to manufacturing and selling and installing lighting
WordNet

lighting-up

  • adjective satellite turning lights on
    • it's lighting-up time
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lights-out

  • noun a prescribed bedtime
  • noun (military) signal to turn the lights out
    taps.
WordNet

Lime light

  • . See Calcium light under Calcium. as one word, limelight means the center of public attention, esp. in the phrase "in the limelight"
Webster 1913

lit crit

  • noun the informed analysis and evaluation of literature
    literary criticism.
WordNet

  • noun light on an airplane that indicates the plane's position and orientation; red light on the left (port) wing tip and green light on the right (starboard) wing tip
WordNet

New light

  • . (Zoöl.) See Crappie.
Webster 1913

Newtonian theory of light

  • . See Note under Light.
Webster 1913

night-light

  • noun light (as a candle or small bulb) that burns in a bedroom at night (as for children or invalids)
WordNet

Northern lights

  • noun the aurora of the northern hemisphere
    aurora borealis.
WordNet
  • . See Aurora borealis, under Aurora.
Webster 1913

one-way light time

  • noun the elapsed time it takes for light (or radio signals) to travel between the Earth and a celestial object
    OWLT.
WordNet

organic light-emitting diode

  • noun a self-luminous diode (it glows when an electrical field is applied to the electrodes) that does not require backlighting or diffusers
    OLED.
WordNet

panel light

  • noun a light to illuminate an instrument panel
WordNet

pilot light

  • noun small auxiliary gas burner that provides a flame to ignite a larger gas burner
    pilot burner; pilot.
  • noun indicator consisting of a light to indicate whether power is on or a motor is in operation
    pilot lamp; indicator lamp.
WordNet

pocket lighter

  • noun a lighter for cigars or cigarettes
    cigar lighter; cigarette lighter.
WordNet

Polar lights

  • the aurora borealis or australis.
Webster 1913

primary color for light

  • noun any of three primary colors of light from which all colors can be obtained by additive mixing
    primary color for light.
    • the primary colors for light are red, blue, and green
WordNet

primary colour for light

  • noun any of three primary colors of light from which all colors can be obtained by additive mixing
    primary color for light.
    • the primary colors for light are red, blue, and green
WordNet

primary subtractive color for light

  • noun any of the three colors that give the primary colors for light after subtraction from white light
    primary subtractive color for light.
    • the primary subtractive colors for light are magenta, cyan, and yellow
WordNet

primary subtractive colour for light

  • noun any of the three colors that give the primary colors for light after subtraction from white light
    primary subtractive color for light.
    • the primary subtractive colors for light are magenta, cyan, and yellow
WordNet

ray of light

  • noun a column of light (as from a beacon)
    shaft; ray of light; irradiation; beam; beam of light; light beam; ray.
WordNet

rear light

  • noun lamp (usually red) mounted at the rear of a motor vehicle
    rear lamp; taillight; tail lamp.
WordNet

red light

  • noun a cautionary sign of danger
    red light.
  • noun the signal to stop
WordNet

red-light district

  • noun a district with many brothels
WordNet

Revolving light

  • a light or lamp in a lighthouse so arranged as to appear and disappear at fixed intervals, either by being turned about an axis so as to show light only at intervals, or by having its light occasionally intercepted by a revolving screen.
Webster 1913

riding light

  • noun a light in the rigging of a ship that is riding at anchor
    riding lamp; anchor light.
WordNet

room light

  • noun light that provides general illumination for a room
WordNet

round-trip light time

  • noun the elapsed time it takes for a signal to travel from Earth to a spacecraft (or other body) and back to the starting point
    RTLT.
WordNet

running light

  • noun light carried by a boat that indicates the boat's direction; vessels at night carry a red light on the port bow and a green light on the starboard bow
    sidelight.
WordNet

saint elmo's light

  • noun an electrical discharge accompanied by ionization of surrounding atmosphere
    Saint Elmo's light; St. Elmo's fire; Saint Ulmo's fire; corona discharge; corona; corposant; Saint Elmo's fire; electric glow.
WordNet

saint ulmo's light

  • noun an electrical discharge accompanied by ionization of surrounding atmosphere
    Saint Elmo's light; St. Elmo's fire; Saint Ulmo's fire; corona discharge; corona; corposant; Saint Elmo's fire; electric glow.
WordNet

see the light

  • verb change for the better
    straighten out; reform.
    • The lazy student promised to reform
    • the habitual cheater finally saw the light
WordNet

shaft of light

  • noun a column of light (as from a beacon)
    shaft; ray of light; irradiation; beam; beam of light; light beam; ray.
WordNet

shed light on

  • verb make free from confusion or ambiguity; make clear
    crystallise; illuminate; straighten out; elucidate; clear; clear up; crystallize; sort out; crystalise; crystalize; enlighten.
    • Could you clarify these remarks?
    • Clear up the question of who is at fault
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sheet lighting

  • noun lightning that appears as a broad sheet; due to reflections of more distant lightning and to diffusion by the clouds
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signal light

  • noun a fire set as a signal
    signal fire.
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southern lights

  • noun the aurora of the southern hemisphere
    aurora australis.
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speed of light

  • noun the speed at which light travels in a vacuum; the constancy and universality of the speed of light is recognized by defining it to be exactly 299,792,458 meters per second
    c; light speed.
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Stage lights

  • the lights by which the stage in a theater is illuminated.
Webster 1913

strip lighting

  • noun light consisting of long tubes (instead of bulbs) that provide the illumination
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strobe light

  • noun scientific instrument that provides a flashing light synchronized with the periodic movement of an object; can make moving object appear stationary
    stroboscope; strobe.
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sweetness and light

  • noun a mild reasonableness
    • when he learned who I was he became all sweetness and light
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The light of the countenance

  • favor; kindness; smiles.
    Lord, lift thou up the light of thy countenance upon us. Ps. iv. 6.
Webster 1913

theater light

  • noun any of various lights used in a theater
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thorough-lighted

Thor"ough-light`ed adjective

Definitions
  1. (Arch.) Provided with thorough lights or windows at opposite sides, as a room or building. Gwilt.
Webster 1913

To bring to light

  • to cause to be disclosed.
  • to disclose; to discover; to make clear; to reveal.
Webster 1913

To come to light

  • to be disclosed.
Webster 1913

To light a fire

  • to kindle the material of a fire.
Webster 1913

To make light of

  • to treat as of little consequence; to slight; to disregard.
Webster 1913

To see the light

  • to come into the light; hence, to come into the world or public notice; as, his book never saw the light. also, see the light of day; (b) to come to understand (sometimes used ironically, said of a person who professes to change his opinion after he has been convinced that it will be in his own interest if the facts are different from his initial beliefs)
Webster 1913

To set light by

  • to undervalue; to slight; to treat as of no importance; to despise.
Webster 1913

To stand in one's own light

  • to take a position which is injurious to one's own interest.
Webster 1913

To walk in the light

  • (Script.), to live in the practice of religion, and to enjoy its consolations. 1 John i. 7.
Webster 1913

top-light

Top"-light` noun

Definitions
  1. (Naut.) A lantern or light on the top of a vessel.
Webster 1913

traffic light

  • noun a visual signal to control the flow of traffic at intersections
    traffic signal; stoplight.
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trip the light fantastic

  • verb move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance
    dance; trip the light fantastic.
    • My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio
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trip the light fantastic toe

  • verb move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance
    dance; trip the light fantastic.
    • My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio
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ultraviolet light

  • noun radiation lying in the ultraviolet range; wave lengths shorter than light but longer than X rays
    ultraviolet radiation; ultraviolet illumination; ultraviolet; UV.
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Vault light

  • a partly glazed plate inserted in a pavement or ceiling to admit light to a vault below.
Webster 1913

very light

  • noun a colored flare fired from a Very pistol
    Very light.
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very-light

  • noun a colored flare fired from a Very pistol
    Very light.
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vigil light

  • noun a candle lighted by a worshiper in a church
    vigil candle.
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visible light

  • noun (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation
    light; visible radiation.
    • the light was filtered through a soft glass window
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wagon-lit

  • noun a passenger car that has berths for sleeping
    sleeping car; sleeper.
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warning light

  • noun a cautionary sign of danger
    red light.
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Watch light

  • a low-burning lamp used by watchers at night; formerly, a candle having a rush wick.
Webster 1913

wave theory of light

  • noun (physics) the theory that light is transmitted as waves
    wave theory; undulatory theory.
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Wax light

  • noun stick of wax with a wick in the middle
    candle; taper.
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  • a candle or taper of wax.
Webster 1913

well-lighted

  • adjective satellite provided with artificial light
    lighted; lit; illuminated.
    • illuminated advertising
    • looked up at the lighted windows
    • a brightly lit room
    • a well-lighted stairwell
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White light

  • . (a) (Physics) Light having the different colors in the same proportion as in the light coming directly from the sun, without having been decomposed, as by passing through a prism. See the Note under Color, n., 1. (b) A kind of firework which gives a brilliant white illumination for signals, etc.
Webster 1913

yellow light

  • noun the signal to proceed with caution
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Zodiacal light

  • noun a luminous tract in the sky; a reflection of sunlight from cosmic dust in the plane of the ecliptic; visible just before sunrise and just after sunset
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  • a luminous tract of the sky, of an elongated, triangular figure, lying near the ecliptic, its base being on the horizon, and its apex at varying altitudes. It is to be seen only in the evening, after twilight, and in the morning before dawn. It is supposed to be due to sunlight reflected from multitudes of meteoroids revolving about the sun nearly in the plane of the ecliptic.
Webster 1913