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hold Idioms & Phrases


anchor-hold

An"chor-hold` noun
Definitions
  1. The hold or grip of an anchor, or that to which it holds.
  2. Hence: Firm hold: security.
Webster 1913

bank holding company

  • noun a holding company owning or controlling one or more banks
WordNet

blanch holding

Blanch" hold`ing
Definitions
  1. (Scots Law) A mode of tenure by the payment of a small duty in white rent (silver) or otherwise.
Webster 1913

blench holding

Blench" hold`ing
Definitions
  1. (Law) See Blanch holding.
Webster 1913

cargo hold

  • noun the space in a ship or aircraft for storing cargo
    storage area; cargo area; hold; cargo deck.
WordNet

choke hold

  • noun a restraining hold; someone loops the arm around the neck of another person in a tight grip, usually from behind
    chokehold.
    • he grabbed the woman in a chokehold, demanded her cash and jewelry, and then fled
WordNet

closely held corporation

  • noun stock is publicly traded but most is held by a few shareholders who have no plans to sell
WordNet

closely-held

  • adjective satellite owned by a relatively few shareholders
    • a closely-held corporation
WordNet

get hold

  • verb get something or somebody for a specific purpose
    line up; find; come up.
    • I found this gadget that will serve as a bottle opener
    • I got hold of these tools to fix our plumbing
    • The chairman got hold of a secretary on Friday night to type the urgent letter
WordNet

get hold of

  • verb get into one's hands, take physically
    take.
    • Take a cookie!
    • Can you take this bag, please
  • verb be in or establish communication with
    get through; contact; reach.
    • Our advertisements reach millions
    • He never contacted his children after he emigrated to Australia
  • verb affect
    clutch; seize.
    • Fear seized the prisoners
    • The patient was seized with unbearable pains
    • He was seized with a dreadful disease
WordNet

Ground hold

  • (Naut.), ground tackle. Obs. Spenser.
Webster 1913

hand-held

  • adjective small and light enough to be operated while you hold it in your hands
    handheld.
    • a hand-held computer
WordNet

hand-held computer

  • noun a portable battery-powered computer small enough to be carried in your pocket
    hand-held computer.
WordNet

hand-held microcomputer

  • noun a portable battery-powered computer small enough to be carried in your pocket
    hand-held computer.
WordNet

hold back

  • verb hold back, as of a danger or an enemy; check the expansion or influence of
    turn back; stop; arrest; contain; check.
    • Arrest the downward trend
    • Check the growth of communism in South East Asia
    • Contain the rebel movement
    • Turn back the tide of communism
  • verb keep under control; keep in check
    keep back; restrain; keep.
    • suppress a smile
    • Keep your temper
    • keep your cool
  • verb refrain from doing
    forbear.
    • she forbore a snicker
  • verb wait before acting
    hold back; wait.
    • the scientists held off announcing their results until they repeated the experiment
  • verb secure and keep for possible future use or application
    retain; keep back; hold.
    • The landlord retained the security deposit
    • I reserve the right to disagree
  • verb hold back; keep from being perceived by others
    conceal; hold back.
    • She conceals her anger well
WordNet

hold close

  • verb hold firmly, usually with one's hands
    hold close; cling to; clutch.
    • She clutched my arm when she got scared
WordNet

hold dear

  • verb be fond of; be attached to
    treasure; care for; cherish.
WordNet

hold down

  • verb keep
    • She manages to hold down two jobs
  • verb restrain
    • please hold down the noise so that the neighbors can sleep
WordNet

hold fast

  • verb stick to firmly
    bind; stick to; adhere; stick; bond.
    • Will this wallpaper adhere to the wall?
WordNet

hold firm

  • verb refuse to abandon one's opinion or belief
    stand firm; stand fast; stand pat.
WordNet

hold forth

  • verb talk at length and formally about a topic
    discourse; dissertate.
    • The speaker dissertated about the social politics in 18th century England
WordNet

hold in

  • verb close in; darkness enclosed him"
    confine; enclose.
  • verb lessen the intensity of; temper; hold in restraint; hold or keep within limits
    control; moderate; curb; contain; hold; check.
    • moderate your alcohol intake
    • hold your tongue
    • hold your temper
    • control your anger
  • verb hold back; keep from being perceived by others
    conceal; hold back.
    • She conceals her anger well
WordNet

hold off

  • verb resist and fight to a standoff
    • Dallas had enough of a lead to hold the Broncos off
  • verb wait before acting
    hold back; wait.
    • the scientists held off announcing their results until they repeated the experiment
WordNet

hold on

  • verb hold firmly
    grasp.
  • verb stop and wait, as if awaiting further instructions or developments
    stop.
    • Hold on a moment!
  • verb be persistent, refuse to stop
    persevere; hang on; hang in; persist.
    • he persisted to call me every night
    • The child persisted and kept asking questions
  • verb hold the phone line open
    hold on; hang on.
    • Please hang on while I get your folder
  • verb retain possession of
    keep.
    • Can I keep my old stuffed animals?
    • She kept her maiden name after she married
WordNet

Hold on! Hold up!

  • wait; stop; forbear. Collog
Webster 1913

hold one's own

  • verb be sufficiently competent in a certain situation
    • He can hold his own in graduate school
  • verb maintain one's position and be in control of a situation
WordNet

hold open

  • verb retain rights to
    save; keep; keep open.
    • keep my job for me while I give birth
    • keep my seat, please
    • keep open the possibility of a merger
WordNet

hold out

  • verb thrust or extend out
    stretch out; extend; exsert; stretch forth; put out.
    • He held out his hand
    • point a finger
    • extend a hand
    • the bee exserted its sting
  • verb stand up or offer resistance to somebody or something
    resist; withstand; stand firm.
  • verb last and be usable
    wear; endure.
    • This dress wore well for almost ten years
  • verb wait uncompromisingly for something desirable
    • He held out for the dessert and did not touch the cheeses
  • verb continue to live through hardship or adversity
    live on; last; live; endure; hold out; go; survive.
    • We went without water and food for 3 days
    • These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America
    • The race car driver lived through several very serious accidents
    • how long can a person last without food and water?
WordNet

hold over

  • verb intimidate somebody (with a threat)
    • She was holding it over him
  • verb hold over goods to be sold for the next season
    carry over.
  • verb keep in a position or state from an earlier period of time
  • verb continue a term of office past the normal period of time
  • verb hold back to a later time
    prorogue; set back; defer; remit; put off; put over; shelve; table; postpone.
    • let's postpone the exam
WordNet

hold still for

  • verb tolerate or bear
    stand for.
    • I won't stand for this kind of behavior!
WordNet

hold sway

  • verb be master; reign or rule
WordNet

hold the line

  • verb hold the line on prices; keep the price of something constant
  • verb hold the phone line open
    hold on; hang on.
    • Please hang on while I get your folder
WordNet

hold tight

  • verb hold firmly, usually with one's hands
    hold close; cling to; clutch.
    • She clutched my arm when she got scared
WordNet

hold up

  • verb be the physical support of; carry the weight of
    support; hold; sustain.
    • The beam holds up the roof
    • He supported me with one hand while I balanced on the beam
    • What's holding that mirror?
  • verb hold up something as an example; hold up one's achievements for admiration
  • verb cause to be slowed down or delayed
    delay; detain.
    • Traffic was delayed by the bad weather
    • she delayed the work that she didn't want to perform
  • verb rob at gunpoint or by means of some other threat
    stick up.
  • verb continue to live through hardship or adversity
    live on; last; live; endure; hold out; go; survive.
    • We went without water and food for 3 days
    • These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America
    • The race car driver lived through several very serious accidents
    • how long can a person last without food and water?
  • verb resist or confront with resistance
    withstand; defy; hold.
    • The politician defied public opinion
    • The new material withstands even the greatest wear and tear
    • The bridge held
  • verb resist or withstand wear, criticism, etc.
    stand up; hold up.
    • Her shoes won't hold up
    • This theory won't hold water
WordNet

hold water

  • verb resist or withstand wear, criticism, etc.
    stand up; hold up.
    • Her shoes won't hold up
    • This theory won't hold water
WordNet

hold-down

  • noun a limitation or constraint
    • taxpayers want a hold-down on government spending
WordNet

holding cell

  • noun a jail in a courthouse where accused persons can be confined during a trial
WordNet

holding company

  • noun a company with controlling shares in other companies
WordNet

holding device

  • noun a device for holding something
WordNet

holding paddock

  • noun a pen where livestock is temporarily confined
    holding paddock; holding pen.
WordNet

holding pattern

  • noun a state of inaction with no progress and no change
    • you should go into a holding pattern until he gets over his disappointment
  • noun the flight path (usually circular) maintained by an aircraft that is awaiting permission to land
WordNet

holding pen

  • noun a pen where livestock is temporarily confined
    holding paddock; holding pen.
WordNet

holding yard

  • noun a pen where livestock is temporarily confined
    holding paddock; holding pen.
WordNet

multibank holding company

  • noun a bank holding company owning several banks
WordNet

privately held corporation

  • noun a corporation owned by a few people; shares have no public market
    closed corporation; private corporation; close corporation.
WordNet

scissor hold

  • noun a wrestling hold in which you wrap your legs around the opponents body or head and put your feet together and squeeze
    scissors; scissors grip; scissor hold; scissor grip.
WordNet

scissors hold

  • noun a wrestling hold in which you wrap your legs around the opponents body or head and put your feet together and squeeze
    scissors; scissors grip; scissor hold; scissor grip.
WordNet

take hold

  • verb assume control
    take charge; take control.
  • verb have or hold in one's hands or grip
    hold.
    • Hold this bowl for a moment, please
    • A crazy idea took hold of him
WordNet

take hold of

  • verb take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of
    catch; grab.
    • Catch the ball!
    • Grab the elevator door!
WordNet

taking hold

  • noun the act of gripping something firmly with the hands (or the tentacles)
    grasping; seizing; prehension.
WordNet

To clap hold of

  • to seize roughly or quickly.
Webster 1913

To held in

  • to restrain; to curd.
Webster 1913

To hold, put, ∨ bring one's nose to the grindstone

  • . See under Grindstone.
Webster 1913

To hold a chapel

  • to have a meeting of the men employed in a printing office, for the purpose of considering questions affecting their interests.
Webster 1913

To hold a wager

  • to lay or hazard a wager. Swift.
Webster 1913

To hold by the button

  • to detain in conversation to weariness; to bore; to buttonhole.
Webster 1913

To hold forth

  • to offer; to exhibit; to propose; to put forward. "The propositions which books hold forth and pretend to teach." Locke.
  • to speak in public; to harangue; to preach. L'Estrange.
Webster 1913

To hold good

  • to remain true or valid; to be operative; to remain in force or effect; as, his promise holds good; the condition still holds good.
Webster 1913

To hold hand

  • to compete successfully or on even conditions. Obs. Shak.
Webster 1913

To hold in

  • to restrain one's self; as, he wanted to laugh and could hardly hold in.
Webster 1913

To hold in hand

  • to toy with; to keep in expectation; to have in one's power. Obs.
    O, fie! to receive favors, return falsehoods, And hold a lady in hand. Beaw. & Fl.
Webster 1913

To hold in play

  • to keep under control; to dally with. Macaulay.
  • to keep occupied or employed.
Webster 1913

To hold in pledge

  • to keep as security.
Webster 1913

To hold off

  • to keep at a distance.
Webster 1913

To hold on

  • to hold in being, continuance or position; as, to hold a rider on.
  • to keep fast hold; to continue; to go on. "The trade held on for many years," Swift.
Webster 1913

To hold one's day

  • to keep one's appointment. Obs. Chaucer.
Webster 1913

To hold one's own

  • . (a) To keep good one's present condition absolutely or relatively; not to fall off, or to lose ground; as, a ship holds her own when she does not lose ground in a race or chase; a man holds his own when he does not lose strength or weight.
  • to keep or maintain one's possessions; to yield nothing; esp., to suffer no loss or disadvantage in a contest.
Webster 1913

To hold one's peace

  • to be silent; to refrain from speaking.
  • to keep silence. -
Webster 1913

To hold opinion with

  • to agree with. Obs. Shak.
Webster 1913

To hold out

  • . (a) To extend; to offer. "Fortune holds out these to you as rewards." B. Jonson. (b) To continue to do or to suffer; to endure. "He can not long hold out these pangs." Shak.
  • to last; to endure; to continue; to maintain one's self; not to yield or give way.
Webster 1913

To hold over

  • to remain in office, possession, etc., beyond a certain date.
Webster 1913

To hold tack

  • to last or hold out. Milton.
Webster 1913

To hold the tongue

  • to be silent.
Webster 1913

To hold to ∨ with

  • to take sides with, as a person or opinion.
Webster 1913

To hold together

  • to be joined; not to separate; to remain in union. Dryden. Locke.
Webster 1913

To hold up

  • . (a) To raise; to lift; as, hold up your head. (b) To support; to sustain. "He holds himself up in virtue."Sir P. Sidney. (c) To exhibit; to display; as, he was held up as an example. (d) To rein in; to check; to halt; as, hold up your horses.
  • . (a) To support one's self; to remain unbent or unbroken; as, to hold up under misfortunes. (b) To cease raining; to cease to stop; as, it holds up. Hudibras. (c) To keep up; not to fall behind; not to lose ground. Collier.
Webster 1913

To hold water

  • . (a) Literally, to retain water without leaking; hence (Fig.), to be whole, sound, consistent, without gaps or holes; commonly used in a negative sense; as, his statements will not hold water. Collog. (b) (Naut.) To hold the oars steady in the water, thus checking the headway of a boat.
Webster 1913

To lay hold of, ∨ To lay hold on

  • to seize; to catch.
Webster 1913

To take hold of

  • to seize; to fix on.
Webster 1913

wrestling hold

  • noun a hold used in the sport of wrestling
WordNet

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

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