logo
Writing Improvement Software

grace Idioms & Phrases


Act of grace

  • an expression often used to designate an act declaring pardon or amnesty to numerous offenders, as at the beginning of a new reign.
Webster 1913

Coup de grace

  • noun the blow that kills (usually mercifully)
    deathblow.
WordNet
  • F., the stroke of mercy with which an executioner ends by death the sufferings of the condemned; hence, a decisive, finishing stroke.
Webster 1913

Day of grace

  • (Theol.), the time of probation, when the offer of divine forgiveness is made and may be accepted.
    That day of grace fleets fast away. I. Watts.
Webster 1913

Days of grace

  • . See Grace.
  • (Com.), the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payer to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States, the days of grace are three, but in some countries more, the usages of merchants being different.
Webster 1913

Expectative grace

  • a mandate given by the pope or a prince appointing a successor to any benefice before it becomes vacant.
Webster 1913

fall from grace

  • verb revert back to bad behavior after a period of good behavior
    • The children fell from grace when they asked for several helpings of dessert
WordNet

free grace

  • noun (Christian theology) the free and unmerited favor or beneficence of God
    free grace; grace.
    • God's grace is manifested in the salvation of sinners
    • there but for the grace of God go I
WordNet

Good graces

  • favor; friendship.
Webster 1913

Grace cup

  • noun cup to be passed around for the final toast after a meal
WordNet
  • . (a) A cup or vessel in which a health is drunk after grace. (b) A health drunk after grace has been said.
    The grace cup follows to his sovereign's health. Hing.
Webster 1913

Grace drink

  • a drink taken on rising from the table; a grace cup.
    To [Queen Margaret, of Scotland] . . . we owe the custom of the grace drink, she having established it as a rule at her table, that whosoever staid till grace was said was rewarded with a bumper. Encyc. Brit.
Webster 1913

grace ethel cecile rosalie allen

  • noun United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)
    Allen; Gracie Allen; Gracie.
WordNet

Grace hoop

  • a hoop used in playing graces. See Grace, n., 13.
Webster 1913

grace kelly

  • noun United States film actress who retired when she married into the royal family of Monaco (1928-1982)
    Kelly; Grace Patricia Kelly; Grace Kelly.
WordNet

Grace note

  • noun an embellishing note usually written in smaller size
    acciaccatura; appoggiatura.
WordNet
  • (Mus.), an appoggiatura. See Appoggiatura, and def. 11 above.
Webster 1913

grace of god

  • noun (Christian theology) the free and unmerited favor or beneficence of God
    free grace; grace.
    • God's grace is manifested in the salvation of sinners
    • there but for the grace of God go I
WordNet

grace patricia kelly

  • noun United States film actress who retired when she married into the royal family of Monaco (1928-1982)
    Kelly; Grace Patricia Kelly; Grace Kelly.
WordNet

Grace stroke

  • a finishing stoke or touch; a coup de grace.
Webster 1913

Herb grace, ∨ Herb of grace

  • . (Bot.) See Rue.
Webster 1913

herb of grace

  • noun European strong-scented perennial herb with grey-green bitter-tasting leaves; an irritant similar to poison ivy
    Ruta graveolens; rue.
WordNet

Means of grace

  • means of securing knowledge of God, or favor with God, as the preaching of the gospel, etc.
Webster 1913

princess grace of monaco

  • noun United States film actress who retired when she married into the royal family of Monaco (1928-1982)
    Kelly; Grace Patricia Kelly; Grace Kelly.
WordNet

saving grace

  • noun (Christian theology) a state of sanctification by God; the state of one who is under such divine influence
    grace; saving grace.
    • the conception of grace developed alongside the conception of sin
    • it was debated whether saving grace could be obtained outside the membership of the church
    • the Virgin lived in a state of grace
  • noun a redeeming quality or characteristic
    • her love of music remains her one saving grace
    • her sense of humor has to be a saving grace
    • the saving grace for both developments is that they are creating jobs
WordNet

state of grace

  • noun (Christian theology) a state of sanctification by God; the state of one who is under such divine influence
    grace; saving grace.
    • the conception of grace developed alongside the conception of sin
    • it was debated whether saving grace could be obtained outside the membership of the church
    • the Virgin lived in a state of grace
WordNet

To do grace

  • to reflect credit upon.
    Content to do the profession some grace. Shak.
Webster 1913

To fall from grace

  • (M. E. Ch.), to sin; to withdraw from the faith.
Webster 1913

To say grace

  • to render thanks before or after a meal.
Webster 1913

To take heart of grace

  • to take courage.
Webster 1913

With a bad grace

  • in a forced, reluctant, or perfunctory manner; ungraciously.
    What might have been done with a good grace would at least be done with a bad grace. Macaulay.
Webster 1913

With a good grace

  • in a fit and proper manner grace fully; graciously.
Webster 1913

Year of grace

  • noun any year of the Christian era
WordNet
  • any year of the Christian era; Anno Domini; A. D. or a. d.
Webster 1913

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

Writing Improvement Software
Writing Improvement Software