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away-going

A*way"-go"ing adjective
Definitions
  1. (Law) Sown during the last years of a tenancy, but not ripe until after its expiration; -- said of crops. Wharton.
Webster 1913

easy going

  • noun easy unobstructed progress
    plain sailing; clear sailing.
    • after we solved that problem the rest was plain sailing
WordNet

easy-going

Eas"y-go`ing adjective
Definitions
  1. Moving easily; hence, mild-tempered; ease-loving; inactive.
Webster 1913

get going

  • verb begin or set in motion
    go; start.
    • I start at eight in the morning
    • Ready, set, go!
  • verb start to be active
    get started; get rolling; get moving; get weaving; get cracking; bestir oneself.
    • Get cracking, please!
WordNet

get-go

  • noun the time at which something is supposed to begin
    outset; showtime; starting time; kickoff; start; offset; beginning; commencement; first.
    • they got an early start
    • she knew from the get-go that he was the man for her
WordNet

get-up-and-go

  • noun enterprising or ambitious drive
    push; energy.
    • Europeans often laugh at American energy
WordNet

give-and-go

  • noun a basketball maneuver; one offensive player passes the ball to another, then runs toward the basket to take a return pass
WordNet

go a long way

  • verb suffice or be adequate for a while or to a certain extent
WordNet

go about

  • verb begin to deal with
    set about; approach.
    • approach a task
    • go about a difficult problem
    • approach a new project
WordNet

go across

  • verb go across or through
    go across; pass.
    • We passed the point where the police car had parked
    • A terrible thought went through his mind
WordNet

go after

  • verb go after with the intent to catch
    chase after; track; dog; trail; tail; tag; give chase; chase.
    • The policeman chased the mugger down the alley
    • the dog chased the rabbit
  • verb go in search of or hunt for
    pursue; quest after; quest for.
    • pursue a hobby
WordNet

go against

  • verb fail to agree with; be in violation of; as of rules or patterns
    break; violate.
    • This sentence violates the rules of syntax
  • verb act in disregard of laws, rules, contracts, or promises
    infract; violate; break; offend; breach; transgress.
    • offend all laws of humanity
    • violate the basic laws or human civilization
    • break a law
    • break a promise
  • verb resist
    buck.
    • buck the trend
WordNet

go ahead

  • verb proceed (with a plan of action)
    plow ahead.
    • He went ahead with the project
WordNet

go all out

  • verb perform a task as well as possible
    do one's best; give one's best; give full measure.
    • The cast gives full measure every night
WordNet

go along

  • verb cooperate or pretend to cooperate
    play along.
    • He decided to play along with the burglars for the moment
  • verb continue a certain state, condition, or activity
    go along; keep; continue; proceed.
    • Keep on working!
    • We continued to work into the night
    • Keep smiling
    • We went on working until well past midnight
  • verb pass by
    elapse; go along; lapse; slip away; glide by; slip by; pass; slide by.
    • three years elapsed
WordNet

go around

  • verb be sufficient
    • There's not enough to go around
  • verb become widely known and passed on
    spread; circulate.
    • the rumor spread
    • the story went around in the office
  • verb go around the flank of (an opposing army)
    outflank.
  • verb turn on or around an axis or a center
    revolve; rotate.
    • The Earth revolves around the Sun
    • The lamb roast rotates on a spit over the fire
  • verb avoid something unpleasant or laborious
    short-circuit; get around; bypass.
    • You cannot bypass these rules!
WordNet

go away

  • verb move away from a place into another direction
    go; depart.
    • Go away before I start to cry
    • The train departs at noon
  • verb go away from a place
    leave; go away.
    • At what time does your train leave?
    • She didn't leave until midnight
    • The ship leaves at midnight
  • verb become invisible or unnoticeable
    vanish; disappear.
    • The effect vanished when day broke
  • verb get lost, as without warning or explanation
    vanish; disappear.
    • He disappeared without a trace
WordNet

go back

  • verb belong to an earlier time
    date back; date from.
    • This story dates back 200 years
  • verb return in thought or speech to something
    recur.
  • verb regain a former condition after a financial loss
    recover; recuperate.
    • We expect the stocks to recover to $2.90
    • The company managed to recuperate
WordNet

go back on

  • verb fail to fulfill a promise or obligation
    renege on; renege; renegue on.
    • She backed out of her promise
WordNet

go bad

  • verb stop operating or functioning
    die; give out; give way; break; go; conk out; fail; break down.
    • The engine finally went
    • The car died on the road
    • The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town
    • The coffee maker broke
    • The engine failed on the way to town
    • her eyesight went after the accident
  • verb become unfit for consumption or use
    spoil.
    • the meat must be eaten before it spoils
WordNet

go ballistic

  • verb get very angry and fly into a rage
    hit the roof; flip one's lid; have kittens; fly off the handle; flip one's wig; hit the ceiling; throw a fit; blow one's stack; lose one's temper; combust; blow up; blow a fuse; have a fit.
    • The professor combusted when the student didn't know the answer to a very elementary question
    • Spam makes me go ballistic
WordNet

go board

  • noun a board used for playing go
WordNet

go by

  • verb pass by
    elapse; go along; lapse; slip away; glide by; slip by; pass; slide by.
    • three years elapsed
  • verb move past
    travel by; pass by; go by; surpass; pass.
    • A black limousine passed by when she looked out the window
    • He passed his professor in the hall
    • One line of soldiers surpassed the other
  • verb be called; go by a certain name
    go by.
    • She goes by her maiden name again
  • verb be or act in accordance with
    • Go by this rule and you'll be safe
WordNet

go deep

  • verb extend in importance or range
    go deep.
    • His accomplishments go far
WordNet

go down

  • verb move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way
    descend; come down; fall.
    • The temperature is going down
    • The barometer is falling
    • The curtain fell on the diva
    • Her hand went up and then fell again
  • verb go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
    go down; settle; sink.
  • verb grow smaller
    decline; wane.
    • Interest in the project waned
  • verb be recorded or remembered
    • She will go down as the first feminist
  • verb be ingested
    • This wine sure goes down well
    • The food wouldn't go down
  • verb be defeated
    • If America goes down, the free world will go down, too
  • verb disappear beyond the horizon
    go down; set.
    • the sun sets early these days
  • verb stop operating
    crash.
    • My computer crashed last night
    • The system goes down at least once a week
WordNet

go down on

  • verb provide sexual gratification through oral stimulation
    blow; fellate; suck.
WordNet

go dutch

  • verb share expenses equally and split the cost of something
    • My boyfriend and I always go Dutch
WordNet

go far

  • verb succeed in a big way; get to the top
    get in; make it; arrive.
    • After he published his book, he had arrived
    • I don't know whether I can make it in science!
    • You will go far, my boy!
  • verb extend in importance or range
    go deep.
    • His accomplishments go far
WordNet

go fish

  • noun a card game for two players who try to assemble books of cards by asking the opponent for particular cards
WordNet

go for

  • verb be pertinent or relevant or applicable
    apply; hold.
    • The same laws apply to you!
    • This theory holds for all irrational numbers
    • The same rules go for everyone
  • verb give an affirmative reply to; respond favorably to
    consent; accept.
    • I cannot accept your invitation
    • I go for this resolution
  • verb intend with some possibility of fulfilment
    hope.
    • I hope to have finished this work by tomorrow evening
  • verb have a fancy or particular liking or desire for
    take to; fancy.
    • She fancied a necklace that she had seen in the jeweler's window
  • verb make an attempt at achieving something
    try for.
    • She tried for the Olympics
WordNet

go for a spin take a spin

  • take a trip in a wheeled vehicle, usu. an automobile.
Webster 1913

go for broke

  • verb risk everything in one big effort
    • the cyclist went for broke at the end of the race
WordNet

go forth

  • verb go away from a place
    leave; go away.
    • At what time does your train leave?
    • She didn't leave until midnight
    • The ship leaves at midnight
  • verb come out of
    emerge; egress; issue; come out; come forth.
    • Water issued from the hole in the wall
    • The words seemed to come out by themselves
WordNet

go forward

  • verb move ahead; travel onward in time or space
    continue; proceed.
    • We proceeded towards Washington
    • She continued in the direction of the hills
    • We are moving ahead in time now
WordNet

go game

  • noun a board game for two players who place counters on a grid; the object is to surround and so capture the opponent's counters
    go.
WordNet

go home

  • verb return home
    head home.
    • After the movie, we went home
WordNet

go in

  • verb to come or go into
    move into; go in; get into; come in; enter; get in.
    • the boat entered an area of shallow marshes
WordNet

go into

  • verb to come or go into
    move into; go in; get into; come in; enter; get in.
    • the boat entered an area of shallow marshes
  • verb be used or required for
    • A lot of energy went into the organization of this banquet
WordNet

go off

  • verb run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along
    abscond; make off; absquatulate; decamp; bolt; run off.
    • The thief made off with our silver
    • the accountant absconded with the cash from the safe
  • verb be discharged or activated
    • the explosive devices went off
  • verb go off or discharge
    fire; discharge.
    • The gun fired
  • verb stop running, functioning, or operating
    • Our power went off during the hurricane
  • verb happen in a particular manner
    come off; go off.
    • how did your talk go over?
  • verb burst inward
    implode.
    • The bottle imploded
WordNet

go off at half-cock

  • verb act prematurely or without reflection or too soon
    go off at half-cock.
    • she wanted to quit her job but her mother told her not to go off half-cocked
WordNet

go off half-cocked

  • verb act prematurely or without reflection or too soon
    go off at half-cock.
    • she wanted to quit her job but her mother told her not to go off half-cocked
WordNet

go on

  • verb continue a certain state, condition, or activity
    go along; keep; continue; proceed.
    • Keep on working!
    • We continued to work into the night
    • Keep smiling
    • We went on working until well past midnight
  • verb come to pass
    fall out; pass off; come about; pass; hap; happen; take place; occur.
    • What is happening?
    • The meeting took place off without an incidence
    • Nothing occurred that seemed important
  • verb move forward, also in the metaphorical sense
    advance; move on; march on; progress; pass on.
    • Time marches on
  • verb continue talking
    carry on; continue; proceed.
    • I know it's hard," he continued, "but there is no choice
    • carry on--pretend we are not in the room
  • verb start running, functioning, or operating
    come up; come on.
    • the lights went on
    • the computer came up
WordNet

go out

  • verb move out of or depart from
    leave; exit; get out.
    • leave the room
    • the fugitive has left the country
  • verb leave the house to go somewhere
    • We never went out when our children were small
  • verb take the field
    • The soldiers went out on missions
  • verb become extinguished
    • The lights suddenly went out and we were in the dark
  • verb go out of fashion; become unfashionable
  • verb date regularly; have a steady relationship with
    date; go out; see.
    • Did you know that she is seeing an older man?
    • He is dating his former wife again!
WordNet

go over

  • verb hold a review (of troops)
    survey; review.
  • verb happen in a particular manner
    come off; go off.
    • how did your talk go over?
  • verb examine so as to determine accuracy, quality, or condition
    check into; suss out; check over; check up on; look into; check out; check.
    • check the brakes
    • Check out the engine
  • verb fall forward and down
    fall over.
    • The old woman went over without a sound
WordNet

go past

  • verb move past
    travel by; pass by; go by; surpass; pass.
    • A black limousine passed by when she looked out the window
    • He passed his professor in the hall
    • One line of soldiers surpassed the other
  • verb be superior or better than some standard
    transcend; exceed; top; overstep; pass.
    • She exceeded our expectations
    • She topped her performance of last year
WordNet

go steady

  • verb date regularly; have a steady relationship with
    date; go out; see.
    • Did you know that she is seeing an older man?
    • He is dating his former wife again!
WordNet

go through

  • verb go or live through
    see; experience.
    • We had many trials to go through
    • he saw action in Viet Nam
  • verb apply thoroughly; think through
    work through; run through.
    • We worked through an example
  • verb go across or through
    go across; pass.
    • We passed the point where the police car had parked
    • A terrible thought went through his mind
  • verb eat immoderately
    down; devour; consume.
    • Some people can down a pound of meat in the course of one meal
  • verb pursue to a conclusion or bring to a successful issue
    follow up; follow through; carry out; follow out; put through; implement.
    • Did he go through with the treatment?
    • He implemented a new economic plan
    • She followed up his recommendations with a written proposal
WordNet

go through the motions

  • verb pretend to do something by acting as if one was really doing it
    • She isn't really working--she's just going through the motions
WordNet

Go to

  • verb be present at (meetings, church services, university), etc.
    attend.
    • She attends class regularly
    • I rarely attend services at my church
    • did you go to the meeting?
WordNet
  • come; move; go away; a phrase of exclamation, serious or ironical.
Webster 1913

go to bed

  • verb prepare for sleep
    retire; sack out; hit the sack; bed; kip down; turn in; go to bed; crawl in; hit the hay.
    • I usually turn in at midnight
    • He goes to bed at the crack of dawn
WordNet

go to pieces

  • verb lose one's emotional or mental composure
    fall apart.
    • She fell apart when her only child died
WordNet

go to pot

  • verb become ruined
    go to pot.
    • His business went to pot when economy soured
WordNet

go to sleep

  • verb prepare for sleep
    retire; sack out; hit the sack; bed; kip down; turn in; go to bed; crawl in; hit the hay.
    • I usually turn in at midnight
    • He goes to bed at the crack of dawn
WordNet

go to the dogs

  • verb become ruined
    go to pot.
    • His business went to pot when economy soured
WordNet

go to war

  • verb commence hostilities
    take arms; take up arms.
WordNet

go under

  • verb go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
    go down; settle; sink.
  • verb disappear beyond the horizon
    go down; set.
    • the sun sets early these days
  • verb be called; go by a certain name
    go by.
    • She goes by her maiden name again
WordNet

go up

  • verb move upward
    come up; rise; uprise; lift; arise; move up.
    • The fog lifted
    • The smoke arose from the forest fire
    • The mist uprose from the meadows
  • verb increase in value or to a higher point
    climb; rise.
    • prices climbed steeply
    • the value of our house rose sharply last year
  • verb move towards
    come near; draw near; near; draw close; come on; approach.
    • We were approaching our destination
    • They are drawing near
    • The enemy army came nearer and nearer
  • verb be erected, built, or constructed
    • New buildings are going up everywhere
  • verb go upward with gradual or continuous progress
    climb up; climb; mount.
    • Did you ever climb up the hill behind your house?
  • verb burn completely; be consumed or destroyed by fire
    burn down; burn up.
    • The hut burned down
    • The mountain of paper went up in flames
  • verb travel up, "We ascended the mountain"
    ascend.
    • go up a ladder
    • The mountaineers slowly ascended the steep slope
WordNet

go with

  • verb be present or associated with an event or entity
    attach to; come with; accompany.
    • French fries come with the hamburger
    • heart attacks are accompanied by distruction of heart tissue
    • fish usually goes with white wine
    • this kind of vein accompanies certain arteries
  • verb go or occur together
    collocate with; construe with; cooccur with; co-occur with.
    • The word 'hot' tends to cooccur with 'cold'
WordNet

go wrong

  • verb be unsuccessful
    fail; miscarry.
    • Where do today's public schools fail?
    • The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably
WordNet

go-ahead

  • noun a signal to proceed
    green light.
  • noun readiness to embark on bold new ventures
    enterprisingness; initiative; enterprise.
WordNet

go-around

  • noun an approach that fails and gives way to another attempt
    overshoot; wave-off.
WordNet

go-as-you-please

  • adjective satellite not bound by rule or law or convention
    • bewildered by the old go-as-you-please liberty of alliterative rhythm"- George Saintsbury
WordNet

go-between

  • noun a negotiator who acts as a link between parties
    intermediator; intercessor; intermediary; mediator.
WordNet
Go"-be*tween` noun
Definitions
  1. An intermediate agent; a broker; a procurer; -- usually in a disparaging sense. Shak.
Webster 1913

go-by

Go"-by` noun
Definitions
  1. A passing without notice; intentional neglect; thrusting away; a shifting off; adieu; as, to give a proposal the go-by.
    Some songs to which we have given the go-by. Prof. Wilson.
Webster 1913

go-cart

  • noun an enclosing framework on casters or wheels; helps babies learn to walk
    walker; baby-walker.
  • noun wheeled vehicle that can be pushed by a person; may have one or two or four wheels
    handcart; cart; pushcart.
    • he used a handcart to carry the rocks away
    • their pushcart was piled high with groceries
  • noun a small vehicle with four wheels in which a baby or child is pushed around
    baby carriage; pusher; baby buggy; pushchair; perambulator; carriage; pram; stroller.
WordNet

go-getter

  • noun someone whose career progresses rapidly
    whizz-kid; ball of fire; whiz-kid.
WordNet

go-kart

  • noun a small low motor vehicle with four wheels and an open framework; used for racing
WordNet

go-out

Go"-out` noun
Definitions
  1. A sluice in embankments against the sea, for letting out the land waters, when the tide is out. Written also gowt.
Webster 1913

go-slow

  • noun a form of protest by workers in which they deliberately slow down in order to cause problem from their employers
WordNet

go-to-meeting

  • adjective satellite used of clothing
    go-to-meeting.
    • my good clothes
    • her Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes
WordNet

going ashore

  • noun debarkation from a boat or ship
WordNet

going away

  • noun the act of departing
    going; departure; leaving.
WordNet

going to jerusalem

  • noun a child's game in which players march to music around a group of chairs that contains one chair less than the number of players; when the music abruptly stops the players scramble to sit and the player who does not find a chair is eliminated; then a chair is removed and the march resumes until only the winner is seated
    musical chairs.
WordNet

going under

  • noun (of a ship) sinking
    foundering.
WordNet

going-out-of-business sale

  • noun a sale of all the tangible assets of a business that is about to close
    • during the Great Depression going-out-of-business sales were very common
WordNet

going-over

  • noun a careful and thorough inspection
  • noun a severe scolding
    dressing down; upbraiding; castigation; earful; bawling out; chewing out.
WordNet

Great go

  • the final examination for a degree at the University of Oxford, England; called also greats. T. Hughes.
Webster 1913

Great go, Little go

  • the final and the preliminary examinations for a degree. Slang, Eng. Univ.
Webster 1913

Happy-go-lucky

  • adjective satellite cheerfully irresponsible
    harum-scarum; slaphappy; carefree; devil-may-care; freewheeling.
    • carefree with his money
    • freewheeling urban youths
    • had a harum-scarum youth
WordNet
  • trusting to hap or luck; improvident; easy-going. "Happy-go-lucky carelessness."
Webster 1913

hard

  • adjective not easy; requiring great physical or mental effort to accomplish or comprehend or endure
    difficult.
    • a difficult task
    • nesting places on the cliffs are difficult of access
    • difficult times
    • why is it so hard for you to keep a secret?
  • adjective dispassionate;
    • took a hard look
    • a hard bargainer
  • adjective resisting weight or pressure
  • adjective satellite very strong or vigorous
    knockout; severe.
    • strong winds
    • a hard left to the chin
    • a knockout punch
    • a severe blow
  • adjective satellite characterized by effort to the point of exhaustion; especially physical effort
    heavy; toilsome; grueling; punishing; operose; backbreaking; arduous; gruelling; laborious.
    • worked their arduous way up the mining valley
    • a grueling campaign
    • hard labor
    • heavy work
    • heavy going
    • spent many laborious hours on the project
    • set a punishing pace
  • adjective produced without vibration of the vocal cords
    voiceless; surd; unvoiced.
    • unvoiced consonants such as `p' and `k' and `s'
  • adjective (of light) transmitted directly from a pointed light source
    concentrated.
  • adjective (of speech sounds); produced with the back of the tongue raised toward or touching the velum
    • Russian distinguished between hard consonants and palatalized or soft consonants
  • adjective satellite given to excessive indulgence of bodily appetites especially for intoxicating liquors
    heavy; intemperate.
    • a hard drinker
  • adjective satellite being distilled rather than fermented; having a high alcoholic content
    strong.
    • hard liquor
  • adjective satellite unfortunate or hard to bear
    tough.
    • had hard luck
    • a tough break
  • adjective satellite dried out
    • hard dry rolls left over from the day before
  • adverb with effort or force or vigor
    • the team played hard
    • worked hard all day
    • pressed hard on the lever
    • hit the ball hard
    • slammed the door hard
  • adverb with firmness
    firmly.
    • held hard to the railing
  • adverb earnestly or intently
    • thought hard about it
    • stared hard at the accused
  • adverb causing great damage or hardship
    severely.
    • industries hit hard by the depression
    • she was severely affected by the bank's failure
  • adverb slowly and with difficulty
    • prejudices die hard
  • adverb indulging excessively
    intemperately; heavily.
    • he drank heavily
  • adverb into a solid condition
    • concrete that sets hard within a few hours
  • adverb very near or close in space or time
    • it stands hard by the railroad tracks
    • they were hard on his heels
    • a strike followed hard upon the plant's opening
  • adverb with pain or distress or bitterness
    • he took the rejection very hard
  • adverb to the full extent possible; all the way
    • hard alee
    • the ship went hard astern
    • swung the wheel hard left
WordNet
  • )
Webster 1913

have a go

  • verb make an attempt at something
    give it a try.
    • I never sat on a horse before but I'll give it a go
WordNet

have a go at it

  • verb have sexual intercourse with
    love; fuck; sleep with; have it away; screw; have intercourse; get it on; lie with; hump; make love; make out; get laid; bonk; eff; have sex; jazz; be intimate; know; have it off; bang; bed; do it; roll in the hay; sleep together.
    • This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm
    • Adam knew Eve
    • Were you ever intimate with this man?
WordNet

hide and go seek

  • noun a game in which a child covers his eyes while the other players hide then tries to find them
    hide-and-seek.
WordNet

high-go

High"-go` noun
Definitions
  1. A spree; a revel. Low
Webster 1913

ill

  • noun an often persistent bodily disorder or disease; a cause for complaining
    complaint; ailment.
  • adjective affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function
    sick.
    • ill from the monotony of his suffering
  • adjective satellite resulting in suffering or adversity
    • ill effects
    • it's an ill wind that blows no good
  • adjective satellite distressing
    • ill manners
    • of ill repute
  • adjective satellite indicating hostility or enmity
    • you certainly did me an ill turn
    • ill feelings
    • ill will
  • adjective satellite presaging ill fortune
    ominous; inauspicious.
    • ill omens
    • ill predictions
    • my words with inauspicious thunderings shook heaven"- P.B.Shelley
    • a dead and ominous silence prevailed
    • a by-election at a time highly unpropitious for the Government
  • adverb (`ill' is often used as a combining form) in a poor or improper or unsatisfactory manner; not well
    badly; poorly.
    • he was ill prepared
    • it ill befits a man to betray old friends
    • the car runs badly
    • he performed badly on the exam
    • the team played poorly
    • ill-fitting clothes
    • an ill-conceived plan
  • adverb unfavorably or with disapproval
    badly.
    • tried not to speak ill of the dead
    • thought badly of him for his lack of concern
  • adverb with difficulty or inconvenience; scarcely or hardly
    • we can ill afford to buy a new car just now
WordNet
Webster 1913

in-going

In"-go`ing noun
Definitions
  1. The act of going in; entrance.
In"-go`ing adjective
Definitions
  1. Going; entering, as upon an office or a possession; as, an in-going tenant.
Webster 1913

keep going

  • verb continue uninterrupted
    run on.
    • The disease will run on unchecked
    • The party kept going until 4 A.M.
  • verb suffice for a period between two points
    tide over; bridge over.
    • This money will keep us going for another year
  • verb be a regular customer or client of
    patronage; support; patronise; patronize.
    • We patronize this store
    • Our sponsor kept our art studio going for as long as he could
WordNet

know what's going on

  • verb be well-informed
    know the score; be with it; know what's what; be on the ball.
WordNet

let go

  • verb release, as from one's grip
    release; relinquish; let go.
    • Let go of the door handle, please!
    • relinquish your grip on the rope--you won't fall
  • verb be relaxed
    • Don't be so worried all the time--just let go!
WordNet

let go of

  • verb release, as from one's grip
    release; relinquish; let go.
    • Let go of the door handle, please!
    • relinquish your grip on the rope--you won't fall
WordNet

let it go

  • verb not act
    • He thought of a reply but let it go
WordNet

Little go

  • (Eng. Universities), a public examination about the middle of the course, which as less strict and important than the final one; called also smalls. Cf. Great go, under Great. Thackeray.
Webster 1913

merry-go-round

  • noun a never-ending cycle of activities and events (especially when they seem to have little purpose)
    • if we lose the election the whole legislative merry-go-round will have to start over
  • noun a large, rotating machine with seats for children to ride or amusement
    roundabout; whirligig; carrousel; carousel.
WordNet
Mer"ry-go`-round" noun
Definitions
  1. Any revolving contrivance for affording amusement; esp., a ring of flying hobbyhorses.
Webster 1913

No go

  • a failure; a fiasco. Slang Thackeray.
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no-go

  • adjective not functioning properly or in suitable condition for proceeding
    • the space launch was no-go
WordNet

no-go area

  • noun an area that is dangerous or impossible to enter or to which entry is forbidden
WordNet

On the go

  • adjective satellite (of a person) very busy and active
    • is always on the go
WordNet
  • moving about; unsettled. Colloq.
Webster 1913

on-going

  • adjective satellite currently happening
    ongoing.
    • an ongoing economic crisis
WordNet

sentry go

  • noun the duty of serving as a sentry
    guard; guard duty; sentry duty.
    • he was on guard that night
WordNet

steady-going

  • adjective satellite consistent in performance or behavior
    dependable; rock-steady.
    • dependable in one's habits
    • a steady-going family man
WordNet

sunday-go-to-meeting

  • adjective satellite used of clothing
    go-to-meeting.
    • my good clothes
    • her Sunday-go-to-meeting clothes
WordNet

To be, go, or run, on all fours

  • (Fig.), to be on the same footing; to correspond (with) exactly; to be alike in all the circumstances to be considered. "This example is on all fours with the other." "No simile can go on all fours." Macaulay.
Webster 1913

To be, ∨ go, long of the market, To be on the long side of the market

  • etc. (Stock Exchange), to hold stock for a rise in price, or to have a contract under which one can demand stock on or before a certain day at a stipulated price; opposed to short in such phrases as, to be short of stock, to sell short, etc. Cant See Short.
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To be at loggerheads, To fall to loggerheads, ∨ To go to loggerheads

  • to quarrel; to be at strife.
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To come and go

  • . (a) To appear and disappear; to change; to alternate. "The color of the king doth come and go." Shak. (b) (Mech.) To play backward and forward.
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To come off, To cut off, To fall off, To go off

  • etc. See under Come, Cut, Fall, Go, etc.
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To go

  • (
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To go (or walk) arm in arm

  • to go with the arm or hand of one linked in the arm of another. "When arm in armwe went along." Tennyson.
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To go a-begging

  • a figurative phrase to express the absence of demand for something which elsewhere brings a price; as, grapes are so plentiful there that they go a-begging.
  • not to be in demand; to be undesired.
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To go about

  • . (a) To set about; to enter upon a scheme of action; to undertake. "They went about to slay him." Acts ix. 29.
    They never go about . . . to hide or palliate their vices. Swift.
    (b) (Naut.) To tack; to turn the head of a ship; to wear.
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To go about, To set about

  • to undertake; to arrange; to prepare. "Shall we set about some revels? Shak.
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To go abraod

  • . (a) To go to a foreign country. (b) To go out of doors. (c) To become public; to be published or disclosed; to be current.
    Then went this saying abroad among the brethren. John xxi. 23.
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To go across the country

  • to go by a direct course across a region without following the roads.
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To go against

  • . (a) To march against; to attack. (b) To be in opposition to; to be disagreeable to.
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To go against the grain of

  • (a person), to be repugnant to; to vex, irritate, mortify, or trouble.
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To go ahead

  • . (a) To go in advance. (b) To go on; to make progress; to proceed.
  • . (a) To go in advance. (b) To go on onward. (c) To push on in an enterprise. Colloq
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To go all fours

  • to correspond exactly, point for point.
    It is not easy to make a simile go on all fours. Macaulay.
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To go and come

  • . See To come and go, under Come.
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To go aside

  • . (a) To withdraw; to retire.
    He . . . went aside privately into a desert place. Luke. ix. 10.
    (b) To go from what is right; to err. Num. v. 29.
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To go astern

  • to go backward, as from the action of currents or winds.
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To go back on

  • to turn back from; to abandon; to betray; as, to go back on a friend; to go back on one's professions. Colloq.
  • . (a) To retrace (one's path or footsteps). (b) To abandon; to turn against; to betray. Slang, U. S.
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To go below

  • (Naut), to go below deck.
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To go bet

  • to go fast; to hurry. Obs.
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To go between

  • to interpose or mediate between; to be a secret agent between parties; in a bad sense, to pander.
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To go beyond

  • to exceed in ingenuity, in research, or in anything else; hence, in a bed sense, to deceive or circumvent.
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To go by

  • to pass away unnoticed; to omit.
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To go by the board

  • to suffer complete destruction or overthrow.
  • (Naut.), to fall or be carried overboard; as, the mast went by the board.
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To go cross lots

  • to go across the fields; totake a short cut. Colloq.
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To go down

  • . (a) To descend. (b) To go below the horizon; as, the sun has gone down. (c) To sink; to founder; said of ships, etc. (d) To be swallowed; used literally or figuratively. Colloq.
    Nothing so ridiculous, . . . but it goes down whole with him for truth. L' Estrange.
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To go far

  • . (a) To go to a distance. (b) To have much weight or influence.
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To go for

  • . (a) To go in quest of. (b) To represent; to pass for. (c) To favor; to advocate. (d) To attack; to assault. Low (e) To sell for; to be parted with for (a price).
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To go for nothing

  • to be parted with for no compensation or result; to have no value, efficacy, or influence; to count for nothing.
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To go forth

  • . (a) To depart from a place. (b) To be divulged or made generally known; to emanate.
    The law shall go forth of Zion, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem. Micah iv. 2.
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To go halves

  • to share with another equally.
  • to share equally between two.
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To go hard with

  • to trouble, pain, or endanger.
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To go heels over head

  • to turn over so as to bring the heels uppermost; hence, to move in a inconsiderate, or rash, manner.
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To go in

  • to engage in; to take part. Colloq.
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To go in and out

  • to do the business of life; to live; to have free access. John x. 9.
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To go in for

  • . Colloq. (a) To go for; to favor or advocate (a candidate, a measure, etc.). (b) To seek to acquire or attain to (wealth, honor, preferment, etc.) (c) To complete for (a reward, election, etc.). (d) To make the object of one's labors, studies, etc.
    He was as ready to go in for statistics as for anything else. Dickens.
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To go in tounto

  • . (a) To enter the presence of. Esther iv. 16.(b) To have sexual intercourse with. Script.
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To go into

  • . (a) To speak of, investigate, or discuss (a question, subject, etc.). (b) To participate in (a war, a business, etc.).
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To go into liquidation

  • (Law), to turn over to a trustee one's assets and accounts, in order that the several amounts of one's indebtedness be authoritatively ascertained, and that the assets may be applied toward their discharge.
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To go into particulars

  • to relate or describe in detail or minutely.
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To go it

  • to behave in a wild manner; to be uproarious; to carry on; also, to proceed; to make progress. Colloq.
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To go it alone

  • (Card Playing), to play a hand without the assistance of one's partner. to do anything without the assistance of one's former associates
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To go it blind

  • . (a) To act in a rash, reckless, or headlong manner. Slang (b) (Card Playing) To bet without having examined the cards. = to bet in the blind
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To go large

  • . (Naut) See under Large.
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To go off

  • . (a) To go away; to depart.
    The leaders . . . will not go off until they hear you. Shak.
    (b) To cease; to intermit; as, this sickness went off. (c) To die. Shak. (d) To explode or be discharged; said of gunpowder, of a gun, a mine, etc. (e) To find a purchaser; to be sold or disposed of. (f) To pass off; to take place; to be accomplished.
    The wedding went off much as such affairs do. Mrs. Caskell.
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To go off halfcocked

  • . (a) To be discharged prematurely, or with the trigger at half cock; said of a firearm. (b) To do or say something without due thought or care. Colloq. or Low
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To go off the hooks

  • to die. Colloq. Thackeray.
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To go on

  • . (a) To proceed; to advance further; to continue; as, to go on reading. (b) To be put or drawn on; to fit over; as, the coat will not go on.
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To go on the road

  • to engage in the business of a commercial traveler. Colloq.
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To go on the stump, ∨ To take the stump

  • to engage in making public addresses for electioneering purposes; a phrase derived from the practice of using a stump for a speaker's platform in newly-settled districts. Hence also the phrases stump orator, stump speaker, stump speech, stump oratory, etc. Colloq. U.S.
Webster 1913

To go one's way

  • to set forth; to depart.
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To go one's way, ∨ To come one's way

  • to go or come; to depart or come along. Shak.
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To go out

  • . (a) To issue forth from a place. (b) To go abroad; to make an excursion or expedition.
    There are other men fitter to go out than I. Shak.
    What went ye out for to see ? Matt. xi. 7, 8, 9.
    (c) To become diffused, divulged, or spread abroad, as news, fame etc. (d) To expire; to die; to cease; to come to an end; as, the light has gone out.
    Life itself goes out at thy displeasure. Addison.
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To go over

  • . (a) To traverse; to cross, as a river, boundary, etc.; to change sides.
    I must not go over Jordan. Deut. iv. 22.
    Let me go over, and see the good land that is beyond Jordan. Deut. iii. 25.
    Ishmael . . . departed to go over to the Ammonites. Jer. xli. 10.
    (b) To read, or study; to examine; to review; as, to go over one's accounts.
    If we go over the laws of Christianity, we shall find that . . . they enjoin the same thing. Tillotson.
    (c) To transcend; to surpass. (d) To be postponed; as, the bill went over for the session. (e) (Chem.) To be converted (into a specified substance or material); as, monoclinic sulphur goes over into orthorhombic, by standing; sucrose goes over into dextrose and levulose.
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To go over to, ∨ To join, the majority

  • to die.
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To go shares

  • to partake; to be equally concerned.
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To go the way of all the earth

  • to die. = to go the way of all flesh.
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To go through

  • . (a) To accomplish; as, to go through a work. (b) To suffer; to endure to the end; as, to go through a surgical operation or a tedious illness. (c) To spend completely; to exhaust, as a fortune. (d) To strip or despoil (one) of his property. Slang (e) To botch or bungle a business. Scot.
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To go through the mill

  • to experience the suffering or discipline necessary to bring one to a certain degree of knowledge or skill, or to a certain mental state.
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To go through with

  • to perform, as a calculation, to the end; to complete.
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To go to ground

  • . (a) To escape into a hole; said of a hunted fox. (b) To fall in battle.
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To go to law

  • to seek a settlement of any matter by bringing it before the courts of law; to sue or prosecute some one.
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To go to meat

  • to go to a meal. Obs.
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To go to naught

  • (Colloq.), to prove abortive, or unavailling.
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To go to pot

  • to go to destruction; to come to an end of usefulness; to become refuse. Colloq.
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To go to rack

  • to perish; to be destroyed. Colloq. "All goes to rack." Pepys.
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To go to sea

  • a adopt the calling or occupation of a sailor.
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To go to the bottom

  • to sink; esp. to be wrecked.
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To go to the dogs

  • to go to ruin; to be ruined.
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To go to the wall

  • to be hard pressed or driven; to be the weaker party; to be pushed to extremes.
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To go to the world

  • to be married. Obs. "Thus goes every one to the world but I . . . ; I may sit in a corner and cry heighho for a husband!" Shak.
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To go to work

  • to begin laboring; to commence operations; to contrive; to manage. "I 'll go another way to work with him." Shak.
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To go under

  • . (a) To set; said of the sun. (b) To be known or recognized by (a name, title, etc. ). (c) To be overwhelmed, submerged, or defeated; to perish; to succumb.
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To go up

  • to come to nothing; to prove abortive; to fail. Slang
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To go upon

  • to act upon, as a foundation or hypothesis.
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To go with

  • . (a) To accompany. (b) To coincide or agree with. (c) To suit; to harmonize with.
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To go without

  • to be, or to remain, destitute of.
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To go wrong

  • . (a) To take a wrong road or direction; to wander or stray. (b) To depart from virtue. (c) To happen unfortunately. (d) To miss success.
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To let go

  • to allow to depart; to quit one's hold; to release.
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To let go by the run

  • (Naut.), to loosen and let run freely, as lines; to let fall without restraint, as a sail.
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To move, run, ∨ go, against time

  • to move, run, or go a given distance without a competitor, in the quickest possible time; or, to accomplish the greatest distance which can be passed over in a given time; as, the horse is to run against time.
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To see how the squares go

  • to see how the game proceeds; a phrase taken from the game of chess, the chessboard being formed with squares. Obs. L'Estrange.
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To touch and go

  • (Naut.), to touch bottom lightly and without damage, as a vessel in motion.
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Touch and go

  • a phrase descriptive of a narrow escape.
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touch-and-go

  • adjective satellite fraught with danger
    precarious; parlous; perilous.
    • dangerous waters
    • a parlous journey on stormy seas
    • a perilous voyage across the Atlantic in a small boat
    • the precarious life of an undersea diver
    • dangerous surgery followed by a touch-and-go recovery
WordNet

way-going

Way"-go`ing adjective
Definitions
  1. Going away; departing; of or pertaining to one who goes away.
Webster 1913

Way-going crop

  • (Law of Leases), a crop of grain to which tenants for years are sometimes entitled by custom; grain sown in the fall to be reaped at the next harvest; a crop which will not ripen until after the termination of the lease. Burrill.
Webster 1913

well

  • noun a deep hole or shaft dug or drilled to obtain water or oil or gas or brine
  • noun a cavity or vessel used to contain liquid
  • noun an abundant source
    wellspring; fountainhead.
    • she was a well of information
  • noun an open shaft through the floors of a building (as for a stairway)
  • noun an enclosed compartment in a ship or plane for holding something as e.g. fish or a plane's landing gear or for protecting something as e.g. a ship's pumps
  • verb come up, as of a liquid
    swell.
    • Tears well in her eyes
    • the currents well up
  • adjective in good health especially after having suffered illness or injury; at least I feel well"
    • appears to be entirely well
    • the wound is nearly well
    • a well man
    • I think I'm well
  • adjective satellite resulting favorably
    good.
    • it's a good thing that I wasn't there
    • it is good that you stayed
    • it is well that no one saw you
    • all's well that ends well
  • adjective satellite wise or advantageous and hence advisable
    • it would be well to start early
  • adverb (often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well')
    good.
    • the children behaved well
    • a task well done
    • the party went well
    • he slept well
    • a well-argued thesis
    • a well-seasoned dish
    • a well-planned party
    • the baby can walk pretty good
  • adverb thoroughly or completely; fully; often used as a combining form
    • The problem is well understood
    • she was well informed
    • shake well before using
    • in order to avoid food poisoning be sure the meat is well cooked
    • well-done beef", "well-satisfied customers
    • well-educated
  • adverb indicating high probability; in all likelihood
    easily.
    • I might well do it
    • a mistake that could easily have ended in disaster
    • you may well need your umbrella
    • he could equally well be trying to deceive us
  • adverb (used for emphasis or as an intensifier) entirely or fully
    • a book well worth reading
    • was well aware of the difficulties ahead
    • suspected only too well what might be going on
  • adverb to a suitable or appropriate extent or degree
    • the project was well underway
    • the fetus has well developed organs
    • his father was well pleased with his grades
  • adverb favorably; with approval
    • their neighbors spoke well of them
    • he thought well of the book
  • adverb to a great extent or degree
    substantially; considerably.
    • I'm afraid the film was well over budget
    • painting the room white made it seem considerably (or substantially) larger
    • the house has fallen considerably in value
    • the price went up substantially
  • adverb with great or especially intimate knowledge
    intimately.
    • we knew them well
  • adverb with prudence or propriety
    • You would do well to say nothing more
    • could not well refuse
  • adverb with skill or in a pleasing manner
    • she dances well
    • he writes well
  • adverb in a manner affording benefit or advantage
    advantageously.
    • she married well
    • The children were settled advantageously in Seattle
  • adverb in financial comfort
    comfortably.
    • They live well
    • she has been able to live comfortably since her husband died
  • adverb without unusual distress or resentment; with good humor
    • took the joke well
    • took the tragic news well
WordNet
Webster 1913

with

  • to affect (one) in such manner.
Webster 1913

woolward-going

Wool"ward-go`ing noun
Definitions
  1. A wearing of woolen clothes next the skin as a matter of penance. Obs.
    Their . . . woolward-going, and rising at midnight. Tyndale.
Webster 1913

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

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