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give Idioms & Phrases


alms-giving

  • noun making voluntary contributions to aid the poor
    almsgiving.
WordNet

be given

  • verb have a tendency or disposition to do or be something; be inclined
    run; incline; lean; tend.
    • She tends to be nervous before her lectures
    • These dresses run small
    • He inclined to corpulence
WordNet

Equimomental cone of a given rigid body

  • a conical surface that has any given vertex, and is described by a straight line which moves in such manner that the moment of inertia of the given rigid body about the line is in all its positions the same.
Webster 1913

give a damn

  • verb show no concern or interest; always used in the negative
    give a damn; care a hang; give a hang.
    • I don't give a hoot
    • She doesn't give a damn about her job
WordNet

give a hang

  • verb show no concern or interest; always used in the negative
    give a damn; care a hang; give a hang.
    • I don't give a hoot
    • She doesn't give a damn about her job
WordNet

give a hoot

  • verb show no concern or interest; always used in the negative
    give a damn; care a hang; give a hang.
    • I don't give a hoot
    • She doesn't give a damn about her job
WordNet

give and take

  • verb make mutual concessions
    • In life you have to give and take
WordNet

give away

  • verb make a gift of
    • She gave away her antique furniture
  • verb make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret
    disclose; reveal; unwrap; bring out; expose; let on; discover; divulge; break; let out.
    • The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold
    • The actress won't reveal how old she is
    • bring out the truth
    • he broke the news to her
    • unwrap the evidence in the murder case
  • verb formally hand over to the bridegroom in marriage; of a bride by her father
  • verb give away information about somebody
    shop; denounce; tell on; stag; rat; betray; snitch; grass; shit.
    • He told on his classmate who had cheated on the exam
WordNet

give back

  • verb pay back
    refund; repay; return.
    • Please refund me my money
WordNet

give birth

  • verb cause to be born
    have; deliver; birth; bear.
    • My wife had twins yesterday!
  • verb create or produce an idea
    • Marx and Engels gave birth to communism
WordNet

give care

  • verb provide care for
    care.
    • The nurse was caring for the wounded
WordNet

give chase

  • verb go after with the intent to catch
    go after; chase after; track; dog; trail; tail; tag; chase.
    • The policeman chased the mugger down the alley
    • the dog chased the rabbit
WordNet

give ear

  • verb give heed (to)
    advert; hang; attend; pay heed.
    • The children in the audience attended the recital quietly
    • She hung on his every word
    • They attended to everything he said
WordNet

give forth

  • verb give out (breath or an odor)
    exhale; emanate.
    • The chimney exhales a thick smoke
WordNet

give full measure

  • verb perform a task as well as possible
    do one's best; go all out; give full measure.
    • The cast gives full measure every night
WordNet

give in

  • verb yield to another's wish or opinion
    defer; accede; submit; bow.
    • The government bowed to the military pressure
  • verb consent reluctantly
    knuckle under; succumb; yield; buckle under.
WordNet

give it a try

  • verb try
    give it a try.
    • let's give it a whirl!
  • verb make an attempt at something
    have a go.
    • I never sat on a horse before but I'll give it a go
WordNet

give it a whirl

  • verb try
    give it a try.
    • let's give it a whirl!
WordNet

give it the deep six

  • verb toss out; get rid of
    deep-six.
    • deep-six these old souvenirs!
WordNet

give notice

  • verb terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or position
    give the axe; send away; fire; dismiss; terminate; displace; sack; give notice; force out; can.
    • The boss fired his secretary today
    • The company terminated 25% of its workers
  • verb inform (somebody) of something
    apprize; send word; apprise; notify; advise.
    • I advised him that the rent was due
WordNet

give off

  • verb have as a by-product
    • The big cities gave off so many wonderful American qualities
  • verb give off, send forth, or discharge; as of light, heat, or radiation, vapor, etc.
    emit; give off.
    • The ozone layer blocks some harmful rays which the sun emits
WordNet

give one's best

  • verb perform a task as well as possible
    do one's best; go all out; give full measure.
    • The cast gives full measure every night
WordNet

give or take

  • adverb plus or minus a small amount
    • it is a mile away, give or take a few hundred yards
WordNet

give out

  • verb give off, send forth, or discharge; as of light, heat, or radiation, vapor, etc.
    emit; give off.
    • The ozone layer blocks some harmful rays which the sun emits
  • verb give to several people
    pass out; distribute; hand out.
    • The teacher handed out the exams
  • verb prove insufficient
    fail; run out.
    • The water supply for the town failed after a long drought
  • verb stop operating or functioning
    die; give out; break; go; go bad; conk out; fail; break down.
    • The engine finally went
    • The car died on the road
    • The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town
    • The coffee maker broke
    • The engine failed on the way to town
    • her eyesight went after the accident
WordNet

give rise

  • verb cause to happen, occur or exist
    produce; bring about.
    • This procedure produces a curious effect
    • The new law gave rise to many complaints
    • These chemicals produce a noxious vapor
    • the new President must bring about a change in the health care system
WordNet

give suck

  • verb give suck to
    wet-nurse; suckle; breastfeed; lactate; suck; nurse.
    • The wetnurse suckled the infant
    • You cannot nurse your baby in public in some places
WordNet

give thanks

  • verb express gratitude or show appreciation to
    thank.
WordNet

give the axe

  • verb terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or position
    give the axe; send away; fire; dismiss; terminate; displace; sack; give notice; force out; can.
    • The boss fired his secretary today
    • The company terminated 25% of its workers
  • verb terminate a relationship abruptly
    give the bounce; give the axe.
    • Mary gave John the axe after she saw him with another woman
WordNet

give the bounce

  • verb terminate a relationship abruptly
    give the bounce; give the axe.
    • Mary gave John the axe after she saw him with another woman
WordNet

give the eye

  • verb look at with a critical eye
    give the eye.
    • When the movie star entered, all the women gave him the once over
WordNet

give the gate

  • verb terminate a relationship abruptly
    give the bounce; give the axe.
    • Mary gave John the axe after she saw him with another woman
WordNet

give the glad eye

  • verb look seductively at someone
WordNet

give the once over

  • verb look at with a critical eye
    give the eye.
    • When the movie star entered, all the women gave him the once over
WordNet

give the sack

  • verb terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or position
    give the axe; send away; fire; dismiss; terminate; displace; sack; give notice; force out; can.
    • The boss fired his secretary today
    • The company terminated 25% of its workers
WordNet

give tongue to

  • verb articulate; either verbally or with a cry, shout, or noise
    utter; express; verbalise; verbalize.
    • She expressed her anger
    • He uttered a curse
WordNet

give up

  • verb lose (s.th.) or lose the right to (s.th.) by some error, offense, or crime
    throw overboard; forego; forfeit; waive; forgo.
    • you've forfeited your right to name your successor
    • forfeited property
  • verb give up with the intent of never claiming again
    abandon.
    • Abandon your life to God
    • She gave up her children to her ex-husband when she moved to Tahiti
    • We gave the drowning victim up for dead
  • verb give up in the face of defeat of lacking hope; admit defeat
    quit; throw in; drop out; throw in the towel; chuck up the sponge; fall by the wayside; drop by the wayside.
    • In the second round, the challenger gave up
  • verb put an end to a state or an activity
    quit; discontinue; lay off; stop; cease.
    • Quit teasing your little brother
  • verb give up what is not strictly needed
    dispense with; spare; part with.
    • he asked if they could spare one of their horses to speed his journey
  • verb part with a possession or right
    release; relinquish; free; resign.
    • I am relinquishing my bedroom to the long-term house guest
    • resign a claim to the throne
  • verb leave (a job, post, or position) voluntarily
    vacate; resign; renounce.
    • She vacated the position when she got pregnant
    • The chairman resigned when he was found to have misappropriated funds
  • verb relinquish possession or control over
    cede; surrender; deliver.
    • The squatters had to surrender the building after the police moved in
  • verb give up or agree to forgo to the power or possession of another
    surrender.
    • The last Taleban fighters finally surrendered
  • verb stop maintaining or insisting on; of ideas or claims
    abandon.
    • He abandoned the thought of asking for her hand in marriage
    • Both sides have to give up some claims in these negotiations
  • verb allow the other (baseball) team to score
    allow.
    • give up a run
  • verb stop consuming
    kick.
    • kick a habit
    • give up alcohol
WordNet

give vent

  • verb give expression or utterance to
    vent; ventilate.
    • She vented her anger
    • The graduates gave vent to cheers
WordNet

give voice

  • verb put into words or an expression
    phrase; articulate; word; formulate.
    • He formulated his concerns to the board of trustees
WordNet

give way

  • verb move in order to make room for someone for something
    ease up; move over; yield; give.
    • The park gave way to a supermarket
    • `Move over,' he told the crowd
  • verb break down, literally or metaphorically
    collapse; founder; give; break; cave in; fall in.
    • The wall collapsed
    • The business collapsed
    • The dam broke
    • The roof collapsed
    • The wall gave in
    • The roof finally gave under the weight of the ice
  • verb end resistance, as under pressure or force
    yield.
    • The door yielded to repeated blows with a battering ram
  • verb stop operating or functioning
    die; give out; break; go; go bad; conk out; fail; break down.
    • The engine finally went
    • The car died on the road
    • The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town
    • The coffee maker broke
    • The engine failed on the way to town
    • her eyesight went after the accident
WordNet

give-and-go

  • noun a basketball maneuver; one offensive player passes the ball to another, then runs toward the basket to take a return pass
WordNet

give-and-take

  • noun an exchange of views on some topic
    word; discussion.
    • we had a good discussion
    • we had a word or two about it
  • noun light teasing repartee
    banter; raillery; backchat.
  • noun mutual interaction; the activity of reciprocating or exchanging (especially information)
    interchange; reciprocation.
WordNet

give-up the ghost

  • verb pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life
    decease; pop off; perish; die; buy the farm; snuff it; choke; drop dead; pass away; expire; exit; croak; pass; go; kick the bucket; conk; cash in one's chips.
    • She died from cancer
    • The children perished in the fire
    • The patient went peacefully
    • The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102
WordNet

given name

  • noun the name that precedes the surname
    first name; forename.
WordNet

giving birth

  • noun the process of giving birth
    birth; parturition; birthing.
WordNet

giving medication

  • noun the act of administering medication
    administration.
WordNet

giving up

  • noun a verbal act of admitting defeat
    surrender; yielding.
  • noun the act of forsaking
    forsaking.
WordNet

life-giving

  • adjective satellite giving or having the power to give life and spirit
    vitalizing.
    • returning the life-giving humus to the land"- Louis Bromfield
    • life-giving love and praise
    • the vitalizing rays of the warming sun
WordNet
Life"-giv`ing adjective
Definitions
  1. Giving life or spirit; having power to give life; inspiriting; invigorating.
Webster 1913

on ∨ upon

  • . (a) To rush; to fall upon. Obs. (b) To have a view of; to be in sight of; to overlook; to look toward; to open upon; to front; to face. A Gallicism: cf. Fr. donner sur.
    Rooms which gave upon a pillared porch. Tennyson.
    The gloomy staircase on which the grating gave. Dickens.
Webster 1913

self-giving

  • adjective satellite willing to deprive yourself
    self-sacrificing; self-denying.
WordNet

To give up ∨ yield up the ghost

  • to die; to expire.
Webster 1913

To come it over, To do over, To give over, etc.

  • See under Come, Do, Give, etc.
Webster 1913

To do one's diligence, give diligence, use diligence

  • to exert one's self; to make interested and earnest endeavor.
Webster 1913

To give

Webster 1913

To give (the land or any object) a wide berth

  • to keep at a distance from it.
Webster 1913

To give (one) the head, ∨ To give head

  • to let go, or to give up, control; to free from restraint; to give license. "He gave his able horse the head." Shak. "He has so long given his unruly passions their head." South.
Webster 1913

To give, ∨ show, quarter

  • (Mil.), to accept as prisoner, on submission in battle; to forbear to kill, as a vanquished enemy.
Webster 1913

To give a handle

  • to furnish an occasion or means.
Webster 1913

To give a loose

  • to give freedom.
Webster 1913

To give a person line

  • to allow him more or less liberty until it is convenient to stop or check him, like a hooked fish that swims away with the line.
Webster 1913

To give a piece of one's mind to

  • to speak plainly, bluntly, or severely to (another). Tackeray.
Webster 1913

To give a say at

  • to attempt.
Webster 1913

To give and take

  • . (a) To average gains and losses. (b) To exchange freely, as blows, sarcasms, etc.
Webster 1913

To give audience

  • to listen; to admit to an interview.
Webster 1913

To give away

  • to make over to another; to transfer.
    Whatsoever we employ in charitable uses during our lives, is given away from ourselves. Atterbury.
Webster 1913

To give back

  • to return; to restore. Atterbury.
  • to recede; to retire; to retreat.
    They gave back and came no farther. Bunyan.
Webster 1913

To give battle

  • to attack an enemy.
Webster 1913

To give birth to

  • . (a) To bear or bring forth, as a child. (b) To originate; to give existence to, as an enterprise, idea.
Webster 1913

To give chase

  • to pursue.
Webster 1913

To give ear to

  • to listen to; to heed, as advice or one advising. "Give ear unto my song." Goldsmith.
Webster 1913

To give effect to

  • to make valid; to carry out in practice; to push to its results.
Webster 1913

To give forth

  • to give out; to publish; to tell. Hayward.
Webster 1913

To give ground

  • to recede; to yield advantage.
    These nine . . . began to give me ground. Shak.
Webster 1913

To give in

  • . (a) To abate; to deduct. (b) To declare; to make known; to announce; to tender; as, to give in one's adhesion to a party.
  • to yield; to succumb; to acknowledge one's self beaten; to cease opposition.
    The Scots battalion was enforced to give in. Hayward.
    This consideration may induce a translator to give in to those general phrases. Pope.
Webster 1913

To give line

  • . See under Line.
Webster 1913

To give off

  • to emit, as steam, vapor, odor, etc.
  • to cease; to forbear. Obs. Locke.
Webster 1913

To give one rope

  • to give one liberty or license; to let one go at will uncheked.
Webster 1913

To give one the bag

  • to disappoint him. Obs.
Webster 1913

To give one the cold shoulder

  • to treat one with neglect.
Webster 1913

To give one the dor

  • to make a fool of him. Archaic
Webster 1913

To give one the lie in his throat

  • to accuse one pointedly of lying abominably.
Webster 1913

To give one the slip

  • to slip away from one; to elude one.
Webster 1913

To give one to understand

  • to cause one to know.
Webster 1913

To give one's self away

  • to make an inconsiderate surrender of one's cause, an unintentional disclosure of one's purposes, or the like. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To give one's self up

  • to abandon hope; to despair; to surrender one's self.
Webster 1913

To give order

  • to give command or directions. Shak.
Webster 1913

To give out

  • . (a) To utter publicly; to report; to announce or declare.
    One that gives out himself Prince Florizel.
    Shak.
    Give out you are of Epidamnum. Shak.
    (b) To send out; to emit; to distribute; as, a substance gives out steam or odors.
  • . (a) To expend all one's strength. Hence: (b) To cease from exertion; to fail; to be exhausted; as, my feet being to give out; the flour has given out.
Webster 1913

To give over

  • . (a) To yield completely; to quit; to abandon. (b) To despair of. (c) To addict, resign, or apply (one's self).
    The Babylonians had given themselves over to all manner of vice. Grew.
  • to cease; to discontinue; to desist.
    It would be well for all authors, if they knew when to give over, and to desist from any further pursuits after fame. Addison.
Webster 1913

To give place

  • to withdraw; to yield one's claim.
  • to make room; to yield; to give way; to give advantage. "Neither give place to the devil." Eph. iv. 27. "Let all the rest give place." Shak.
Webster 1913

To give points

  • . (a) In games of skill, to equalize chances by conceding a certain advantage; to allow a handicap. (b) To give useful suggestions. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To give possession

  • to put in another's power or occupancy.
Webster 1913

To give rein

  • . See under Rein, n.
Webster 1913

To give rein, To give the rein to

  • to give license to; to leave withouut restrain.
Webster 1913

To give room

  • to withdraw; to leave or provide space unoccupied for others to pass or to be seated.
Webster 1913

To give the bag

  • to cheat. Obs.
    I fear our ears have given us the bag. J. Webster.
Webster 1913

To give the hand

  • to pledge friendship or faith.
Webster 1913

To give the hand of

  • to espouse; to bestow in marriage.
Webster 1913

To give the head

  • . See under Head, n.
Webster 1913

To give the lie to

  • (a person), to tell (him) that he lies.
  • . (a) To charge with falsehood; as, the man gave him the lie. (b) To reveal to be false; as, a man's actions may give the lie to his words.
Webster 1913

To give the mitten to

  • to dismiss as a lover; to reject the suit of. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To give the sack

  • . Same as To give the bag.
Webster 1913

To give the sack toget the sack

  • to discharge, or be discharged, from employment; to jilt, or be jilted. Slang
Webster 1913

To give the time of day

  • to salute one with the compliment appropriate to the hour, as "good morning." "good evening", etc.
Webster 1913

To give the whetstone

  • to give a premium for extravagance in falsehood. Obs.
Webster 1913

To give time

  • (Law), to accord extension or forbearance to a debtor. Abbott.
Webster 1913

To give to wife, To take to wife

  • to give or take (a woman) in marriage.
Webster 1913

To give tongue

  • in hunter's phrase, to bark; said of dogs.
Webster 1913

To give up

  • . (a) To abandon; to surrender. "Don't give up the ship."
    He has . . . given up For certain drops of salt, your city Rome. Shak.
    (b) To make public; to reveal.
    I'll not state them By giving up their characters. Beau. & Fl.
    (c) (Used also reflexively. )
  • to cease from effort; to yield; to despair; as, he would never give up.
Webster 1913

To give up the ghost

  • . See under Ghost.
Webster 1913

To give vent to

  • to suffer to escape; to let out; to pour forth; as, to give vent to anger.
Webster 1913

To give way

  • . (a) To withdraw; to give place. (b) To yield to force or pressure; as, the scaffolding gave way. (c) (Naut.) To begin to row; or to row with increased energy. (d) (Stock Exchange). To depreciate or decline in value; as, railroad securities gave way two per cent.
Webster 1913

To give way together

  • to row in time; to keep stroke.
Webster 1913

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

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