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all get out

  • noun an unimaginably large amount
    billy-ho; billyo; billyoh.
    • British say `it rained like billyo' where Americans say `it rained like all get out'
WordNet

attention-getting

  • adjective satellite seizing the attention
    eye-catching.
    • eye-catching posters
  • adjective satellite likely to attract attention
    catchy.
    • a catchy title for a movie
WordNet

get a line

  • verb get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally
    pick up; get a line; discover; see; hear; learn; find out; get wind.
    • I learned that she has two grown-up children
    • I see that you have been promoted
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get a load

  • verb look at with attention
    take a look; have a look.
    • Have a look at this!
    • Get a load of this pretty woman!
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get a look

  • verb see something for a brief time
    catch sight; catch a glimpse.
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get a noseful

  • verb smell strongly and intensely
    get a noseful.
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get a whiff

  • verb smell strongly and intensely
    get a noseful.
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get about

  • verb move around; move from place to place
    get about.
    • How does she get around without a car?
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get across

  • verb communicate successfully
    put over.
    • I couldn't get across the message
    • He put over the idea very well
  • verb become clear or enter one's consciousness or emotions
    get across; sink in; come home; fall into place; penetrate; dawn; click.
    • It dawned on him that she had betrayed him
    • she was penetrated with sorrow
  • verb travel across or pass over
    traverse; track; pass over; get across; cover; cross; cut through; cut across.
    • The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day
WordNet

get ahead

  • verb obtain advantages, such as points, etc.
    make headway; advance; gain ground; win; gain; pull ahead.
    • The home team was gaining ground
    • After defeating the Knicks, the Blazers pulled ahead of the Lakers in the battle for the number-one playoff berth in the Western Conference
WordNet

get along

  • verb proceed or get along
    fare; do; make out; come.
    • How is she doing in her new job?
    • How are you making out in graduate school?
    • He's come a long way
  • verb have smooth relations
    get on; get along; get along with.
    • My boss and I get along very well
  • verb develop in a positive way
    advance; come along; shape up; come on; progress; get along.
    • He progressed well in school
    • My plants are coming along
    • Plans are shaping up
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get along with

  • verb have smooth relations
    get on; get along; get along with.
    • My boss and I get along very well
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get around

  • verb be released or become known; of news
    break; get around.
    • News of her death broke in the morning
  • verb avoid something unpleasant or laborious
    short-circuit; go around; bypass.
    • You cannot bypass these rules!
  • verb be a social swinger; socialize a lot
    swing.
  • verb move around; move from place to place
    get about.
    • How does she get around without a car?
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get around to

  • verb do something despite obstacles such as lack of time
    • He finally got around to painting the windows
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get at

  • verb reach or gain access to
    access.
    • How does one access the attic in this house?
    • I cannot get to the T.V. antenna, even if I climb on the roof
  • verb influence by corruption
  • verb cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    annoy; rag; devil; bother; vex; irritate; nettle; rile; nark; get at; gravel; chafe.
    • Mosquitoes buzzing in my ear really bothers me
    • It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves
WordNet

get away

  • verb run away from confinement
    break loose; escape.
    • The convicted murderer escaped from a high security prison
  • verb escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action
    escape; get off; get by; get away.
    • She gets away with murder!
    • I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities
  • verb remove oneself from a familiar environment, usually for pleasure or diversion
    escape.
    • We escaped to our summer house for a few days
    • The president of the company never manages to get away during the summer
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get back

  • verb recover something or somebody that appeared to be lost
    win back.
    • We got back the money after we threatened to sue the company
    • He got back his son from the kidnappers
  • verb take revenge or even out a score
    get back.
    • I cannot accept the defeat--I want to get even
  • verb get one's revenge for a wrong or an injury
    settle.
    • I finally settled with my old enemy
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get behind

  • verb to lag or linger behind
    drop behind; hang back; trail; drag; drop back.
    • But in so many other areas we still are dragging
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get by

  • verb come to terms with
    contend; deal; cope; manage; grapple; make out; make do.
    • We got by on just a gallon of gas
    • They made do on half a loaf of bread every day
  • verb pass or move in front of
    • Bride's Biscuit got by the other dogs to win the race
  • verb escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action
    escape; get off; get by; get away.
    • She gets away with murder!
    • I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities
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get cracking

  • verb start to be active
    get started; get rolling; get going; get moving; get cracking; bestir oneself.
    • Get cracking, please!
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get down

  • verb lower (one's body) as by kneeling
    • Get down on your knees!
  • verb move something or somebody to a lower position
    take down; lower; let down; bring down.
    • take down the vase from the shelf
  • verb alight from (a horse)
    light; dismount; unhorse; get down.
  • verb pass through the esophagus as part of eating or drinking
    swallow.
    • Swallow the raw fish--it won't kill you!
  • verb lower someone's spirits; make downhearted
    depress; dispirit; dismay; deject; demoralise; cast down; demoralize.
    • These news depressed her
    • The bad state of her child's health demoralizes her
  • verb put down in writing; of texts, musical compositions, etc.
    put down; write down; set down.
  • verb take the first step or steps in carrying out an action
    begin; get; start out; set about; start; set out; commence.
    • We began working at dawn
    • Who will start?
    • Get working as soon as the sun rises!
    • The first tourists began to arrive in Cambodia
    • He began early in the day
    • Let's get down to work now
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get dressed

  • verb put on clothes
    dress.
    • we had to dress quickly
    • dress the patient
    • Can the child dress by herself?
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get even

  • verb compensate; make the score equal
    equalise; equalize.
  • verb take revenge or even out a score
    get back.
    • I cannot accept the defeat--I want to get even
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get going

  • verb begin or set in motion
    go; start.
    • I start at eight in the morning
    • Ready, set, go!
  • verb start to be active
    get started; get rolling; get going; get moving; get cracking; bestir oneself.
    • Get cracking, please!
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get hitched with

  • verb take in marriage
    get hitched with; wed; marry; conjoin; espouse; hook up with.
WordNet

get hold

  • verb get something or somebody for a specific purpose
    line up; find; come up.
    • I found this gadget that will serve as a bottle opener
    • I got hold of these tools to fix our plumbing
    • The chairman got hold of a secretary on Friday night to type the urgent letter
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get hold of

  • verb get into one's hands, take physically
    take.
    • Take a cookie!
    • Can you take this bag, please
  • verb be in or establish communication with
    contact; reach; get hold of.
    • Our advertisements reach millions
    • He never contacted his children after he emigrated to Australia
  • verb affect
    clutch; seize.
    • Fear seized the prisoners
    • The patient was seized with unbearable pains
    • He was seized with a dreadful disease
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get in

  • verb to come or go into
    move into; go in; come in; go into; enter; get in.
    • the boat entered an area of shallow marshes
  • verb succeed in a big way; get to the top
    make it; arrive; go far.
    • After he published his book, he had arrived
    • I don't know whether I can make it in science!
    • You will go far, my boy!
  • verb secure a place in a college, university, etc.
    get in.
  • verb of trains; move into (a station)
    pull in; draw in; move in.
    • The bullet train drew into Tokyo Station
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get in touch

  • verb establish communication with someone
    touch base; connect.
    • did you finally connect with your long-lost cousin?
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get into

  • verb get involved in or with
    tangle with.
  • verb to come or go into
    move into; go in; come in; go into; enter; get in.
    • the boat entered an area of shallow marshes
  • verb secure a place in a college, university, etc.
    get in.
  • verb familiarize oneself thoroughly with
    • He really got into semantics
  • verb put clothing on one's body
    assume; don; wear; put on.
    • What should I wear today?
    • He put on his best suit for the wedding
    • The princess donned a long blue dress
    • The queen assumed the stately robes
    • He got into his jeans
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get it

  • verb understand, usually after some initial difficulty
    get it; catch on; latch on; tumble; get onto; twig; cotton on.
    • She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on
  • verb receive punishment
    • You are going to get it!
WordNet

get it on

  • verb have sexual intercourse with
    love; fuck; sleep with; have it away; screw; have intercourse; get it on; lie with; hump; make love; make out; have a go at it; bonk; eff; have sex; jazz; be intimate; know; have it off; bang; bed; do it; roll in the hay; sleep together.
    • This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm
    • Adam knew Eve
    • Were you ever intimate with this man?
WordNet

get laid

  • verb have sexual intercourse with
    love; fuck; sleep with; have it away; screw; have intercourse; get it on; lie with; hump; make love; make out; have a go at it; bonk; eff; have sex; jazz; be intimate; know; have it off; bang; bed; do it; roll in the hay; sleep together.
    • This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm
    • Adam knew Eve
    • Were you ever intimate with this man?
WordNet

get married

  • verb take in marriage
    get hitched with; wed; marry; conjoin; espouse; hook up with.
WordNet

get moving

  • verb start to be active
    get started; get rolling; get going; get moving; get cracking; bestir oneself.
    • Get cracking, please!
WordNet

get off

  • verb leave a vehicle, aircraft, etc.
  • verb be relieved of one's duties temporarily
  • verb transfer
    send off; send.
    • The spy sent the classified information off to Russia
  • verb cause to be acquitted; get off the hook; in a legal case
    • The lawyer got him off, even though there was no doubt in everybody's mind that he killed his wife
  • verb escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action
    escape; get off; get by; get away.
    • She gets away with murder!
    • I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities
  • verb enjoy in a sexual way
    • He gets off on shoes
  • verb alight from (a horse)
    light; dismount; unhorse; get down.
  • verb get out of quickly
    hop out.
    • The officer hopped out when he spotted an illegally parked car
  • verb send via the postal service
    mail.
    • I'll mail you the check tomorrow
  • verb get high, stoned, or drugged
    trip out; turn on; trip.
    • He trips every weekend
  • verb deliver verbally
    • He got off the best line I've heard in a long time
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get off the ground

  • verb get started or set in motion, used figuratively
    take off.
    • the project took a long time to get off the ground
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get on

  • verb have smooth relations
    get on; get along; get along with.
    • My boss and I get along very well
  • verb get on board of (trains, buses, ships, aircraft, etc.)
    board.
  • verb get up on the back of
    hop on; mount; mount up; bestride; jump on; climb on.
    • mount a horse
  • verb grow late or (of time) elapse
    • It is getting on midnight--let's all go to bed!
  • verb appear in a show, on T.V. or radio
    be on.
    • The news won't be on tonight
  • verb develop in a positive way
    advance; come along; shape up; come on; progress; get along.
    • He progressed well in school
    • My plants are coming along
    • Plans are shaping up
  • verb grow old or older
    age; maturate; senesce; mature.
    • She aged gracefully
    • we age every day--what a depressing thought!
    • Young men senesce
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get on with

  • verb have smooth relations
    get on; get along; get along with.
    • My boss and I get along very well
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get one's lumps

  • verb suffer the results or consequences of one's behavior or actions
    take one's lumps.
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get onto

  • verb understand, usually after some initial difficulty
    get it; catch on; latch on; tumble; get onto; twig; cotton on.
    • She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on
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get out

  • verb move out of or depart from
    leave; go out; exit.
    • leave the room
    • the fugitive has left the country
  • verb take out of a container or enclosed space
    bring out.
    • Get out your best dress--we are going to a party!
  • verb move out or away
    pull out.
    • The troops pulled out after the cease-fire
  • verb express with difficulty
    • I managed to get out a few words
  • verb bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover
    take out; pull; draw; pull out.
    • draw a weapon
    • pull out a gun
    • The mugger pulled a knife on his victim
  • verb be released or become known; of news
    break; get around.
    • News of her death broke in the morning
  • verb escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action
    escape; get off; get by; get away.
    • She gets away with murder!
    • I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities
WordNet

get over

  • verb travel across or pass over
    traverse; track; pass over; get across; cover; cross; cut through; cut across.
    • The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day
  • verb to bring (a necessary but unpleasant task) to an end
    • Let's get this job over with
    • It's a question of getting over an unpleasant task
  • verb improve in health
    get over; bounce back.
    • He got well fast
  • verb get on top of; deal with successfully
    master; subdue; overcome; surmount.
    • He overcame his shyness
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get rid of

  • verb dispose of
    remove.
    • Get rid of these old shoes!
    • The company got rid of all the dead wood
  • verb terminate, end, or take out
    extinguish; eliminate; do away with.
    • Let's eliminate the course on Akkadian hieroglyphics
    • Socialism extinguished these archaic customs
    • eliminate my debts
  • verb do away with
    abolish.
    • Slavery was abolished in the mid-19th century in America and in Russia
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get rolling

  • verb start to be active
    get started; get rolling; get going; get moving; get cracking; bestir oneself.
    • Get cracking, please!
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get started

  • verb start to be active
    get started; get rolling; get going; get moving; get cracking; bestir oneself.
    • Get cracking, please!
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get stuck

  • verb be unable to move further
    mire; bog down; grind to a halt.
    • The car bogged down in the sand
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get the best

  • verb overcome, usually through no fault or weakness of the person that is overcome
    have the best; overcome.
    • Heart disease can get the best of us
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get the better of

  • verb win a victory over
    overcome; defeat.
    • You must overcome all difficulties
    • defeat your enemies
    • He overcame his shyness
    • He overcame his infirmity
    • Her anger got the better of her and she blew up
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get the goods

  • verb discover some bad or hidden information about
    • She got the goods on her co-worker after reading his e-mail
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get the hang

  • verb be or become completely proficient or skilled in
    master.
    • She mastered Japanese in less than two years
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get the jump

  • verb be there first
    • They had gotten the jump on their competitors
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get the picture

  • verb get the meaning of something
    grok; apprehend; dig; comprehend; grasp; compass; savvy.
    • Do you comprehend the meaning of this letter?
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get through

  • verb finish a task completely
    finish up; wrap up; clear up; mop up; polish off; finish off.
    • I finally got through this homework assignment
  • verb spend or pass, as with boredom or in a pleasant manner; of time
    while away.
  • verb succeed in reaching a real or abstract destination after overcoming problems
    come through.
    • We finally got through the bureaucracy and could talk to the Minister
  • verb be in or establish communication with
    contact; reach; get hold of.
    • Our advertisements reach millions
    • He never contacted his children after he emigrated to Australia
  • verb become clear or enter one's consciousness or emotions
    get across; sink in; come home; fall into place; penetrate; dawn; click.
    • It dawned on him that she had betrayed him
    • she was penetrated with sorrow
WordNet

get to

  • verb reach a goal, e.g., "make the first team"
    progress to; make; reach.
    • We made it!
    • She may not make the grade
  • verb arrive at the point of
    • She gets to fretting if I stay away from home too long
  • verb cause annoyance in; disturb, especially by minor irritations
    annoy; rag; devil; bother; vex; irritate; nettle; rile; nark; get at; gravel; chafe.
    • Mosquitoes buzzing in my ear really bothers me
    • It irritates me that she never closes the door after she leaves
WordNet

get to grips

  • verb deal with (a problem or a subject)
    come to grips.
    • I still have not come to grips with the death of my parents
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get together

  • noun a small informal social gathering
    meeting.
    • there was an informal meeting in my living room
  • verb get people together
    assemble; gather.
    • assemble your colleagues
    • get together all those who are interested in the project
    • gather the close family members
  • verb get together socially or for a specific purpose
    meet.
  • verb work together on a common enterprise of project
    collaborate; join forces; cooperate.
    • The soprano and the pianist did not get together very well
    • We joined forces with another research group
  • verb become part of; become a member of a group or organization
    fall in; join.
    • He joined the Communist Party as a young man
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get under one's skin

  • verb irritate
    get.
    • Her childish behavior really get to me
    • His lying really gets me
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get up

  • verb rise to one's feet
    stand up; rise; uprise; arise.
    • The audience got up and applauded
  • verb get up and out of bed
    rise; turn out; uprise; arise.
    • I get up at 7 A.M. every day
    • They rose early
    • He uprose at night
  • verb raise from a lower to a higher position
    elevate; lift; bring up; raise.
    • Raise your hands
    • Lift a load
  • verb cause to rise
    • The sergeant got us up at 2 A.M.
  • verb develop
    work up.
    • we worked up an as of an appetite
  • verb put on special clothes to appear particularly appealing and attractive
    rig out; dress up; fig out; overdress; trick up; deck out; prink; tog out; fig up; deck up; fancy up; attire; tog up; gussy up; trick out.
    • She never dresses up, even when she goes to the opera
    • The young girls were all fancied up for the party
  • verb arrange by systematic planning and united effort
    organize; prepare; devise; machinate; organise.
    • machinate a plot
    • organize a strike
    • devise a plan to take over the director's office
  • verb study intensively, as before an exam
    drum; grind away; swot up; bone up; bone; cram; mug up; swot.
    • I had to bone up on my Latin verbs before the final exam
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get weaving

  • verb start to be active
    get started; get rolling; get going; get moving; get cracking; bestir oneself.
    • Get cracking, please!
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get well

  • verb improve in health
    get over; bounce back.
    • He got well fast
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get wind

  • verb get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally
    pick up; get a line; discover; see; hear; learn; find out; get wind.
    • I learned that she has two grown-up children
    • I see that you have been promoted
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get wise

  • verb understand, usually after some initial difficulty
    get it; catch on; latch on; tumble; get onto; twig; cotton on.
    • She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on
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get word

  • verb get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally
    pick up; get a line; discover; see; hear; learn; find out; get wind.
    • I learned that she has two grown-up children
    • I see that you have been promoted
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get worse

  • verb deteriorate in health
    relapse.
    • he relapsed
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get-at-able

  • adjective satellite capable of being reached or attained
    getatable; come-at-able.
    • a very getatable man
    • both oil and coal are there but not in getatable locations
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get-go

  • noun the time at which something is supposed to begin
    outset; showtime; starting time; kickoff; start; offset; beginning; commencement; first.
    • they got an early start
    • she knew from the get-go that he was the man for her
WordNet

get-penny

Get"-pen`ny noun
Definitions
  1. Something which gets or gains money; a successful affair. Colloq. Chapman.
Webster 1913

get-up

Get"-up noun
Definitions
  1. General composition or structure; manner in which the parts of a thing are combined; make-up; style of dress, etc. Colloq. H. Kingsley.
Webster 1913

get-up-and-go

  • noun enterprising or ambitious drive
    push; energy.
    • Europeans often laugh at American energy
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get-well card

  • noun a card expressing get-well wishes
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getting even

  • noun a reciprocal group action
    paying back; return.
    • in return we gave them as good as we got
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have got

  • verb have or possess, either in a concrete or an abstract sense
    hold; have.
    • She has $1,000 in the bank
    • He has got two beautiful daughters
    • She holds a Master's degree from Harvard
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ill-gotten

  • adjective satellite obtained illegally or by improper means
    dirty.
    • dirty money
    • ill-gotten gains
WordNet

To have, ∨ get, the (higher) upper hand

  • to have, or get, the better of another person or thing.
Webster 1913

To get loose ∨ free

  • to disengage one's self; to be released from confinement.
Webster 1913

To get (or to hold) In chancery

  • (Boxing), to get the head of an antagonist under one's arm, so that one can pommel it with the other fist at will; hence, to have wholly in One's power. The allusion is to the condition of a person involved in the chancery court, where he was helpless, while the lawyers lived upon his estate.
Webster 1913

To get, ∨ have, the start

  • to before another; to gain or have the advantage in a similar undertaking; usually with of. "Get the start of the majestic world." Shak. "She might have forsaken him if he had not got the start of her." Dryden.
Webster 1913

To get, ∨ To gather, ground

  • to gain ground. R. "Evening mist . . . gathers ground fast." Milton.
    There is no way for duty to prevail, and get ground of them, but by bidding higher. South.
Webster 1913

To get a mile

  • (or other distance), to pass over it in traveling.
Webster 1913

To get ahead

  • to advance; to prosper.
Webster 1913

To get ahead of

  • . (a) To get in advance of. (b) To surpass; to get the better of. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To get along

  • to proceed; to advance; to prosper.
  • to get on; to make progress, as in business. "She 'll get along in heaven better than you or I." Mrs. Stowe.
Webster 1913

To get among

  • to go or come into the company of; to become one of a number.
Webster 1913

To get asleep

  • to fall asleep.
Webster 1913

To get astray

  • to wander out of the right way.
Webster 1913

To get at

  • to reach; to make way to.
Webster 1913

To get away with

  • to carry off; to capture; hence, to get the better of; to defeat.
Webster 1913

To get back

  • to arrive at the place from which one departed; to return.
Webster 1913

To get before

  • to arrive in front, or more forward.
Webster 1913

To get behind

  • to fall in the rear; to lag.
Webster 1913

To get between

  • to arrive between.
Webster 1913

To get beyond

  • to pass or go further than; to exceed; to surpass. "Three score and ten is the age of man, a few get beyond it." Thackeray.
Webster 1913

To get by heart

  • to commit to memory.
Webster 1913

To get clear

  • to disengage one's self; to be released, as from confinement, obligation, or burden; also, to be freed from danger or embarrassment.
Webster 1913

To get drunk

  • to become intoxicated.
Webster 1913

To get forward

  • to proceed; to advance; also, to prosper; to advance in wealth.
Webster 1913

To get hand

  • to gain influence. Obs.
    Appetites have . . . got such a hand over them. Baxter.
Webster 1913

To get home

  • to arrive at one's dwelling, goal, or aim.
Webster 1913

To get into

  • . (a) To enter, as, "she prepared to get into the coach." Dickens. (b) To pass into, or reach; as, " as, " a language has got into the inflated state." Keary.
Webster 1913

To get into trouble

  • to get into difficulty or danger. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To get near

  • to approach within a small distance.
Webster 1913

To get off

  • . (a) To utter; to discharge; as, to get off a joke. (b) To go away; to escape; as, to get off easily from a trial . Colloq.
Webster 1913

To get on

  • to proceed; to advance; to prosper.
Webster 1913

To get over

  • . (a) To pass over, surmount, or overcome, as an obstacle or difficulty. (b) To recover from, as an injury, a calamity.
Webster 1913

To get rid of

  • to get deliverance from; to free one's self from.
Webster 1913

To get square with

  • to get even with; to pay off. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To get the best o

  • f, to gain an advantage over, whether fairly or unfairly.
Webster 1913

To get the better of, To get the best of

  • to obtain an advantage over; to surpass; to subdue.
Webster 1913

To get the hang of

  • to learn the method or arrangement of; hence, to become accustomed to. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To get the range of

  • (an object) (Gun.), to find the angle at which the piece must be raised to reach (the object) without carrying beyond.
Webster 1913

To get through

  • . (a) To pass through something. (b) To finish what one was doing.
Webster 1913

To get up

  • . (a) To rise; to arise, as from a bed, chair, etc. (b) To ascend; to climb, as a hill, a tree, a flight of stairs, etc.
  • to cause to be established or to exit; to prepare; to arrange; to construct; to invent; as, to get up a celebration, a machine, a book, an agitation.
Webster 1913

To get wind

  • to be divulged; to become public; as, the story got wind, or took wind.
Webster 1913

To give the sack toget the sack

  • to discharge, or be discharged, from employment; to jilt, or be jilted. Slang
Webster 1913

To got one's hand in

  • to make a beginning in a certain work; to become accustomed to a particular business.
Webster 1913

To put (∨ getset) the cart before the horse

  • to invert the order of related facts or ideas, as by putting an effect for a cause.
Webster 1913

To put, or get, one's back up

  • to assume an attitude of obstinate resistance (from the action of a cat when attacked.) . Colloq.
Webster 1913

un-get-at-able

  • adjective satellite difficult to reach or attain
    ungetatable; un-come-at-able.
WordNet