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door Idioms & Phrases


accordion door

  • noun an interior door that opens by folding back in sections (rather than by swinging on hinges)
    accordion door.
WordNet

back door

  • noun a secret or underhand means of access (to a place or a position)
    backdoor.
    • he got his job through the back door
  • noun an undocumented way to get access to a computer system or the data it contains
    backdoor.
  • noun an entrance at the rear of a building
    backdoor; back entrance.
WordNet
Back" door"
Definitions
  1. A door in the back part of a building; hence, an indirect way. Atterbury.
Webster 1913

barn door

  • noun the large sliding door of a barn
WordNet

Batten door

  • (Arch.), a door made of boards of the whole length of the door, secured by battens nailed crosswise.
Webster 1913

bi-fold door

  • noun an interior door
WordNet

Blank door, Blind door

  • etc. (Arch.) See under Blank, Blind, etc.
Webster 1913

Blank door, ∨ Blank window

  • (Arch.), a depression in a wall of the size of a door or window, either for symmetrical effect, or for the more convenient insertion of a door or window at a future time, should it be needed.
Webster 1913

Blind door, Blind window

  • an imitation of a door or window, without an opening for passage or light. See Blank door or window, under Blank, a.
Webster 1913

car door

  • noun the door of a car
WordNet

cargo door

  • noun door used to load or unload cargo
WordNet

Clack door

  • (Mining), removable cover of the opening through which access is had to a pump valve.
Webster 1913

closed-door

  • adjective satellite not open to the public
    • a closed-door meeting
WordNet

Dead door

  • (Shipbuilding), a storm shutter fitted to the outside of the quarter-gallery door.
Webster 1913

Death's door

  • the boundary of life; the partition dividing life from death.
Webster 1913

door guard

  • noun someone who guards an entrance
    ostiary; gatekeeper; doorkeeper; doorman; porter; hall porter.
WordNet

door latch

  • noun spring-loaded doorlock that can only be opened from the outside with a key
    latch.
WordNet

door prize

  • noun tickets are passed out at the entrance to a dance or party or other social function and a prize is awarded to the holder of the winning ticket
WordNet

door-to-door

  • adjective satellite (of e.g. journeys or deliveries) direct from point of origin to point of destination
    • the limousine offers door-to-door service
  • adjective satellite omitting no one; from the door of one house to that of the next
    house-to-house.
    • a door-to-door campaign
    • house-to-house coverage
WordNet

double door

  • noun two vertical doors that meet in the middle of the door frame when closed
WordNet

Dutch door

  • noun an exterior door divided in two horizontally; either half can be closed or open independently
    Dutch door.
WordNet
  • a door divided into two parts, horizontally, so arranged that the lower part can be shut and fastened, while the upper part remains open.
Webster 1913

exterior door

  • noun a doorway that allows entrance to or exit from a building
    exterior door.
WordNet

False door ∨ window

  • (Arch.), the representation of a door or window, inserted to complete a series of doors or windows or to give symmetry.
Webster 1913

Feed door

  • a door to a furnace, by which to supply coal.
Webster 1913

fire door

  • noun a fire-resistant door that can be closed to stop the spread of a fire
WordNet

Folding door

  • noun an interior door that opens by folding back in sections (rather than by swinging on hinges)
    accordion door.
WordNet
  • one of two or more doors filling a single and hung upon hinges.
Webster 1913

Fore door

  • . Same as Front door.
Webster 1913

french door

  • noun a light door with transparent or glazed panels extending the full length
WordNet

Front door

  • noun exterior door (at the entrance) at the front of a building
    front entrance.
WordNet
  • the door in the front wall of a building, usually the principal entrance.
Webster 1913

half door

  • noun an exterior door divided in two horizontally; either half can be closed or open independently
    Dutch door.
WordNet

hatchback door

  • noun a sloping rear car door that is lifted to open
    hatchback.
WordNet

In doors, ∨ Within doors

  • within the house.
Webster 1913

interior door

  • noun a door that closes off rooms within a building
WordNet

Jib door

  • (Arch.), a door made flush with the wall, without dressings or moldings; a disguised door.
Webster 1913

next door

  • adverb at or in or to the adjacent residence
    in the adjacent apartment; in the adjacent house.
    • the criminal had been living next door all this time
WordNet

Next door to

  • near to; bordering on.
    A riot unpunished is but next door to a tumult. L'Estrange.
Webster 1913

open door

  • noun the policy of granting equal trade opportunities to all countries
    open door.
  • noun freedom of access
    • he maintained an open door for all employees
WordNet

open-door policy

  • noun the policy of granting equal trade opportunities to all countries
    open door.
WordNet

Out of door, Out of doors

  • beyond the doors; from the house; in, or into, the open air; hence, figuratively, shut out; dismissed. See under Door, also, Out-of-door, Outdoor, Outdoors, in the Vocabulary. "He 's quality, and the question's out of door," Dryden.
Webster 1913

out of doors

  • adverb outside a building
    outside; alfresco; outdoors.
    • in summer we play outside
WordNet

Out of doors, ∨ Without doors, and, colloquially, Out doors

  • out of the house; in open air; abroad; away; lost.
    His imaginary title of fatherhood is out of doors. Locke.
Webster 1913

out-of-door

  • adjective located, suited for, or taking place in the open air
    outside; outdoor.
    • outdoor clothes
    • badminton and other outdoor games
    • a beautiful outdoor setting for the wedding
WordNet
Out`-of-door" adjective
Definitions
  1. Being out of the house; being, or done, in the open air; outdoor; as, out-of-door exercise. See Out of door, under Out, adv.
    Amongst out-of-door delights. G. Eliot.
Webster 1913

out-of-doors

  • noun where the air is unconfined
    open; open air; outdoors.
    • he wanted to get outdoors a little
    • the concert was held in the open air
    • camping in the open
WordNet

outside door

  • noun a doorway that allows entrance to or exit from a building
    exterior door.
WordNet

Overhung door

  • a sliding door, suspended door, suspended from the top, as upon rollers.
Webster 1913

revolving door

  • noun an organization or institution with a high rate of turnover of personnel or membership
  • noun a door consisting of four orthogonal partitions that rotate about a central pivot; a door designed to equalize the air pressure in tall buildings
    revolver.
WordNet

Screen door

  • noun a door that consists of a frame holding metallic or plastic netting; used to allow ventilation and to keep insects from entering a building through the open door
    screen.
    • he heard the screen slam as she left
WordNet
  • a door of which half or more is composed of a screen.
Webster 1913

service door

  • noun an entrance intended for the use of servants or for delivery of goods and removal of refuse
    servant's entrance; service entrance.
WordNet

show the door

  • verb ask to leave
    • I was shown the door when I asked for a raise
WordNet

side door

  • noun an exterior door at one side of a building
    side entrance.
WordNet

sliding door

  • noun a door that opens by sliding instead of swinging
WordNet

Stage door

  • noun an entrance to the backstage area of theater; used by performers and other theater personnel
WordNet
  • the actor's and workmen's entrance to a theater.
Webster 1913

Storm door

  • noun an extra outer door for protection against severe weather or winter
WordNet
  • (Arch.), an extra outside door to prevent the entrance of wind, cold, rain, etc.; usually removed in summer. or replaced with a screen door; storm and screen door.
Webster 1913

Street door

  • a door which opens upon a street, or is nearest the street.
Webster 1913

swing door

  • noun a door that swings on a double hinge; opens in either direction
    swing door.
WordNet

swinging door

  • noun a door that swings on a double hinge; opens in either direction
    swing door.
WordNet

To keep the wolf from the door

  • to keep away poverty; to prevent starvation. See Wolf, 3, above. Tennyson.
Webster 1913

To lay (a fault, misfortune, etc.) at one's door

  • to charge one with a fault; to blame for.
Webster 1913

To lie at one's door

  • to be imputable or chargeable to.
    If I have failed, the fault lies wholly at my door. Dryden.
Webster 1913

To lie at the door of

  • to be imputable to; as, the sin, blame, etc., lies at your door.
Webster 1913

To make the doors

  • to shut the door. Obs.
    Make the doors upon a woman's wit, and it will out at the casement. Shak.
    -
Webster 1913

To swing a door, gate, etc.

  • (Carp.), to put it on hinges so that it can swing or turn.
Webster 1913

trap door

  • noun a hinged or sliding door in a floor or ceiling
WordNet

trap-door spider

  • noun American spider that constructs a silk-lined nest with a hinged lid
WordNet

Venetian door

  • (Arch.), a door having long, narrow windows or panes of glass on the sides.
Webster 1913

Weather door

  • . (Mining) See Trapdoor, 2.
Webster 1913

wicket door

  • noun small gate or door (especially one that is part of a larger door)
    wicket gate; wicket.
WordNet

Wicket door, Wicket gate

  • a small door or gate; a wicket. See def. 1, above. Bunyan.
Webster 1913

without-door

With*out"-door` adjective
Definitions
  1. Outdoor; exterior. Obs. "Her without-door form." Shak.
Webster 1913

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

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