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away Idioms & Phrases


away game

  • noun a game played away from home
    road game.
WordNet

Away with

  • bear, abide . Obs. or Archaic
    "The calling of assemblies, I can not away with." (Isa. i. 13
    ), i. e., "I can not bear or endure [it]."
  • one, signifies, take him away. "Away with, crucify him." John xix. 15.
Webster 1913

away-going

A*way"-go"ing adjective
Definitions
  1. (Law) Sown during the last years of a tenancy, but not ripe until after its expiration; -- said of crops. Wharton.
Webster 1913

back away

  • verb make a retreat from an earlier commitment or activity
    back out; crawfish; pull back; pull in one's horns; crawfish out; withdraw; retreat.
    • We'll have to crawfish out from meeting with him
    • He backed out of his earlier promise
    • The aggressive investment company pulled in its horns
WordNet

barter away

  • verb trade in in a bartering transaction
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bear away

  • verb remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional state; transport into a new location or state
    bear off; carry away; carry off; bear away.
    • Their dreams carried the Romantics away into distant lands
    • The car carried us off to the meeting
    • I'll take you away on a holiday
    • I got carried away when I saw the dead man and I started to cry
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beaver away

  • verb work hard on something
    beaver.
WordNet

blaze away

  • verb perform (an acting passage) brilliantly and rapidly
    • Mr. Jones blazed away in one passage after another to loud applause
  • verb shoot rapidly and repeatedly
    blaze.
    • He blazed away at the men
  • verb speak with fire and passion
    • He blazed away at his opponents in the Senate
WordNet

  • verb force to go away by blinking
    wink; blink.
    • blink away tears
WordNet

break away

  • verb move away or escape suddenly
    break; break out.
    • The horses broke from the stable
    • Three inmates broke jail
    • Nobody can break out--this prison is high security
  • verb break off (a piece from a whole)
    chip; chip off; break off; come off.
    • Her tooth chipped
  • verb interrupt a continued activity
    break.
    • She had broken with the traditional patterns
  • verb withdraw from an organization or communion
    splinter; secede.
    • After the break up of the Soviet Union, many republics broke away
  • verb flee; take to one's heels; cut and run
    lam; run; head for the hills; hightail it; bunk; take to the woods; scarper; escape; fly the coop; break away; scat; turn tail.
    • If you see this man, run!
    • The burglars escaped before the police showed up
WordNet

breaking away

  • noun the act of breaking away or withdrawing from
    breakaway.
    • there was a breakaway by the discontented members
    • a breaking away from family and neighborhood
  • noun departing hastily
WordNet

carry away

  • verb remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional state; transport into a new location or state
    bear off; carry away; carry off; bear away.
    • Their dreams carried the Romantics away into distant lands
    • The car carried us off to the meeting
    • I'll take you away on a holiday
    • I got carried away when I saw the dead man and I started to cry
WordNet

cart away

  • verb take away by means of a vehicle
    cart off; haul off; cart away.
    • They carted off the old furniture
WordNet

cast away

  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss out.
    • Put away your worries
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chase away

  • verb force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings
    turn back; drive out; dispel; chase away; drive off; run off.
    • Drive away potential burglars
    • drive away bad thoughts
    • dispel doubts
    • The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers
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chip away

  • verb remove or withdraw gradually: "These new customs are chipping away at the quality of life"
    chip away.
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chip away at

  • verb remove or withdraw gradually: "These new customs are chipping away at the quality of life"
    chip away.
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clear away

  • verb remove from sight
    clear off.
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come away

  • verb come to be detached
    detach; come off.
    • His retina detached and he had to be rushed into surgery
  • verb leave in a certain condition
    • She came away angry
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cut away

  • verb move quickly to another scene or focus when filming
    • `cut away now!' the director shouted
  • verb remove by cutting off or away
    • cut away the branch that sticks out
WordNet

die away

  • verb become less in amount or intensity
    slack off; slack; abate; let up.
    • The storm abated
    • The rain let up after a few hours
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do away with

  • verb terminate, end, or take out
    extinguish; eliminate; get rid of.
    • Let's eliminate the course on Akkadian hieroglyphics
    • Socialism extinguished these archaic customs
    • eliminate my debts
WordNet

draw away

  • verb move ahead of (one's competitors) in a race
  • verb remove by drawing or pulling
    draw off; pull off.
    • She placed the tray down and drew off the cloth
    • draw away the cloth that is covering the cheese
WordNet

drift away

  • verb lose personal contact over time
    drift apart.
    • The two women, who had been roommates in college, drifted apart after they got married
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drive away

  • verb force to go away; used both with concrete and metaphoric meanings
    turn back; drive out; dispel; chase away; drive off; run off.
    • Drive away potential burglars
    • drive away bad thoughts
    • dispel doubts
    • The supermarket had to turn back many disappointed customers
WordNet

drop away

  • verb get worse
    drop off; drop away; slip.
    • My grades are slipping
WordNet

dwindle away

  • verb become smaller or lose substance
    dwindle; dwindle down.
    • Her savings dwindled down
WordNet

dwindling away

  • noun a becoming gradually less
    dwindling.
    • there is no greater sadness that the dwindling away of a family
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eat away

  • verb remove soil or rock
    erode; fret.
    • Rain eroded the terraces
  • verb wear away or erode
    fret.
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eating away

  • noun (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
    wearing; eating away; eroding; erosion.
WordNet

ebb away

  • verb flow back or recede
    ebb off; ebb out; ebb down; ebb.
    • the tides ebbed at noon
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fade away

  • verb become weaker
    dissolve; fade out.
    • The sound faded out
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fading away

  • noun gradually diminishing in brightness or loudness or strength
WordNet

fall away

  • verb get worse
    drop off; drop away; slip.
    • My grades are slipping
  • verb diminish in size or intensity
    fall off.
WordNet

Falling away, Falling off

  • etc. See To fall away, To fall off, etc., under Fall, v. i.
Webster 1913

far and away

  • adverb by a considerable margin
    far and away; by far.
    • she was by far the smartest student
    • it was far and away the best meal he had ever eaten
WordNet

file away

  • verb place in a container for keeping records
    file.
    • File these bills, please
  • verb put into an archive
    archive.
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flow away

  • verb flow off or away gradually
    flow off.
    • The water flowed off from the pipe
WordNet

fool away

  • verb spend frivolously and unwisely
    shoot; fool; fool away; fritter away; dissipate; fritter.
    • Fritter away one's inheritance
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frighten away

  • verb cause to lose courage
    scare off; frighten off; dash; pall; daunt; scare; frighten away.
    • dashed by the refusal
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fritter away

  • verb spend frivolously and unwisely
    shoot; fool; fool away; fritter away; dissipate; fritter.
    • Fritter away one's inheritance
WordNet

frivol away

  • verb spend frivolously and unwisely
    shoot; fool; fool away; fritter away; dissipate; fritter.
    • Fritter away one's inheritance
WordNet

get away

  • verb run away from confinement
    break loose; escape.
    • The convicted murderer escaped from a high security prison
  • verb escape potentially unpleasant consequences; get away with a forbidden action
    get out; escape; get off; get by.
    • She gets away with murder!
    • I couldn't get out from under these responsibilities
  • verb remove oneself from a familiar environment, usually for pleasure or diversion
    escape.
    • We escaped to our summer house for a few days
    • The president of the company never manages to get away during the summer
WordNet

give away

  • verb make a gift of
    • She gave away her antique furniture
  • verb make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret
    disclose; reveal; unwrap; bring out; expose; let on; discover; divulge; break; let out.
    • The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold
    • The actress won't reveal how old she is
    • bring out the truth
    • he broke the news to her
    • unwrap the evidence in the murder case
  • verb formally hand over to the bridegroom in marriage; of a bride by her father
  • verb give away information about somebody
    shop; denounce; tell on; stag; rat; betray; snitch; grass; shit.
    • He told on his classmate who had cheated on the exam
WordNet

go away

  • verb move away from a place into another direction
    go; depart.
    • Go away before I start to cry
    • The train departs at noon
  • verb go away from a place
    leave; go forth.
    • At what time does your train leave?
    • She didn't leave until midnight
    • The ship leaves at midnight
  • verb become invisible or unnoticeable
    vanish; disappear.
    • The effect vanished when day broke
  • verb get lost, as without warning or explanation
    vanish; disappear.
    • He disappeared without a trace
WordNet

going away

  • noun the act of departing
    going; departure; leaving.
WordNet

grind away

  • verb study intensively, as before an exam
    drum; swot up; bone up; get up; bone; cram; mug up; swot.
    • I had to bone up on my Latin verbs before the final exam
WordNet

haul away

  • verb take away by means of a vehicle
    cart off; haul off; cart away.
    • They carted off the old furniture
WordNet

have it away

  • verb have sexual intercourse with
    love; fuck; sleep with; screw; have intercourse; get it on; lie with; hump; make love; make out; get laid; have a go at it; bonk; eff; have sex; jazz; be intimate; know; have it off; bang; bed; do it; roll in the hay; sleep together.
    • This student sleeps with everyone in her dorm
    • Adam knew Eve
    • Were you ever intimate with this man?
WordNet

hive away

  • verb keep or lay aside for future use
    salt away; put in; stack away; hive away; lay in; store.
    • store grain for the winter
    • The bear stores fat for the period of hibernation when he doesn't eat
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home away from home

  • noun a place where you are just as comfortable and content as if you were home
    home from home.
WordNet

keep away

  • verb prevent from coming close
    • I tried to keep the child away from the pool
WordNet

laugh away

  • verb deal with a problem by laughing or pretending to be amused by it
    laugh off.
    • She laughs away all these problems
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lay away

  • verb save up as for future use
    cache; stash; lay away; hive up; hoard.
WordNet

lock away

  • verb place in a place where something cannot be removed or someone cannot escape
    lock up; shut up; lock; lock in; put away; lock away.
    • The parents locked her daughter up for the weekend
    • She locked her jewels in the safe
WordNet

look away

  • verb avert one's gaze
    • She looked away when the nurse pricked her arm with the needle
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out and away

  • adverb by a considerable margin
    far and away; by far.
    • she was by far the smartest student
    • it was far and away the best meal he had ever eaten
WordNet

pass away

  • verb pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life
    decease; give-up the ghost; pop off; perish; die; buy the farm; snuff it; choke; drop dead; expire; exit; croak; pass; go; kick the bucket; conk; cash in one's chips.
    • She died from cancer
    • The children perished in the fire
    • The patient went peacefully
    • The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102
  • verb go out of existence
    • She hoped that the problem would eventually pass away
WordNet

peg away

  • verb work doggedly or persistently
    keep one's shoulder to the wheel; peg away; slog; keep one's nose to the grindstone.
    • She keeps plugging away at her dissertation
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piddle away

  • verb waste time; spend one's time idly or inefficiently
    trifle; piddle away; wanton; piddle.
WordNet

pine away

  • verb lose vigor, health, or flesh, as through grief
    waste; languish.
    • After her husband died, she just pined away
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plug away

  • verb work doggedly or persistently
    keep one's shoulder to the wheel; peg away; slog; keep one's nose to the grindstone.
    • She keeps plugging away at her dissertation
  • verb persist in working hard
    plug.
    • Students must plug away at this problem
WordNet

pull away

  • verb pull back or move away or backward
    retire; recede; pull back; move back; withdraw; draw back; retreat.
    • The enemy withdrew
    • The limo pulled away from the curb
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push away

  • verb push out of the way
    push aside.
WordNet

put away

  • verb place in a place where something cannot be removed or someone cannot escape
    lock up; shut up; lock; lock in; put away; lock away.
    • The parents locked her daughter up for the weekend
    • She locked her jewels in the safe
  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss out.
    • Put away your worries
  • verb lock up or confine, in or as in a jail
    incarcerate; jug; remand; lag; immure; gaol; jail; imprison; put behind bars.
    • The suspects were imprisoned without trial
    • the murderer was incarcerated for the rest of his life
  • verb stop using
    put aside.
    • the children were told to put away their toys
    • the students put away their notebooks
  • verb kill gently, as with an injection
    put to sleep.
    • the cat was very ill and we had to put it to sleep
  • verb eat up; usually refers to a considerable quantity of food
    tuck in; put away.
    • My son tucked in a whole pizza
  • verb turn away from and put aside, perhaps temporarily
    put aside.
    • it's time for you to put away childish things
WordNet

rationalise away

  • verb substitute a natural for a supernatural explanation of
    rationalise away.
    • you can rationalize away all the strange noises you hear--there is no poltergeist in the house!
WordNet

rationalize away

  • verb substitute a natural for a supernatural explanation of
    rationalise away.
    • you can rationalize away all the strange noises you hear--there is no poltergeist in the house!
WordNet

ride away

  • verb ride away on a horse, for example
    ride off.
WordNet

right away

  • adverb without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening
    straightaway; forthwith; like a shot; at once; straight off; directly; immediately; now; instantly.
    • he answered immediately
    • found an answer straightaway
    • an official accused of dishonesty should be suspended forthwith
    • Come here now!
  • adverb at once (usually modifies an undesirable occurrence)
    promptly.
    • he promptly forgot the address
WordNet

Right away, ∨ Right off

  • at once; straightway; without delay. Colloq. U.S. "We will . . . shut ourselves up in the office and do the work right off." D. Webster.
Webster 1913

run away

  • verb flee; take to one's heels; cut and run
    lam; run; head for the hills; hightail it; bunk; take to the woods; scarper; escape; fly the coop; break away; scat; turn tail.
    • If you see this man, run!
    • The burglars escaped before the police showed up
  • verb escape from the control of
    • Industry is running away with us all
WordNet

running away

  • noun the act of leaving (without permission) the place you are expected to be
WordNet

rush away

  • verb depart in a hurry
    rush off.
WordNet

salt away

  • verb keep or lay aside for future use
    salt away; put in; stack away; hive away; lay in; store.
    • store grain for the winter
    • The bear stores fat for the period of hibernation when he doesn't eat
WordNet

scare away

  • verb cause to lose courage
    scare off; frighten off; dash; pall; daunt; scare; frighten away.
    • dashed by the refusal
WordNet

send away

  • verb stop associating with
    drop; send packing; dismiss.
    • They dropped her after she had a child out of wedlock
  • verb terminate the employment of; discharge from an office or position
    give the axe; give the sack; fire; dismiss; terminate; displace; sack; give notice; force out; can.
    • The boss fired his secretary today
    • The company terminated 25% of its workers
WordNet

shoo away

  • verb drive away by crying `shoo!'
    shoo off; shoo.
WordNet

shut away

  • verb place in a place where something cannot be removed or someone cannot escape
    lock up; shut up; lock; lock in; put away; lock away.
    • The parents locked her daughter up for the weekend
    • She locked her jewels in the safe
WordNet

shy away from

  • verb avoid having to deal with some unpleasant task
    • I shy away from this task
WordNet

sign away

  • verb formally assign ownership of
    sign over.
    • She signed away her rights
WordNet

slip away

  • verb leave furtively and stealthily
    sneak away; sneak out; slip away; sneak off.
    • The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard
  • verb pass by
    elapse; go along; lapse; go by; glide by; slip by; pass; slide by.
    • three years elapsed
WordNet

sneak away

  • verb leave furtively and stealthily
    sneak away; sneak out; slip away; sneak off.
    • The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard
WordNet

spirit away

  • verb carry off mysteriously; as if by magic
    spirit off.
  • verb carry away rapidly and secretly, as if mysteriously
WordNet

Spiriting away

  • (Law), causing to leave; the offense of inducing a witness to leave a jurisdiction so as to evade process requiring attendance at trial.
Webster 1913

square away

  • verb put (things or places) in order
    straighten out; tidy up; tidy; straighten; clean up; neaten.
    • Tidy up your room!
WordNet

squirrel away

  • verb save up as for future use
    cache; stash; lay away; hive up; hoard.
WordNet

stack away

  • verb keep or lay aside for future use
    salt away; put in; stack away; hive away; lay in; store.
    • store grain for the winter
    • The bear stores fat for the period of hibernation when he doesn't eat
WordNet

stash away

  • verb keep or lay aside for future use
    salt away; put in; stack away; hive away; lay in; store.
    • store grain for the winter
    • The bear stores fat for the period of hibernation when he doesn't eat
WordNet

stay away

  • verb stay clear of, avoid
    keep one's eyes off; stand back; keep one's hands off; keep one's distance.
    • Keep your hands off my wife!
    • Keep your distance from this man--he is dangerous
WordNet

steal away

  • verb leave furtively and stealthily
    sneak away; sneak out; slip away; sneak off.
    • The lecture was boring and many students slipped out when the instructor turned towards the blackboard
WordNet

stow away

  • verb hide aboard a ship or a plane to get free transportation
    • The illegal immigrants stowed away on board the freighter
WordNet

sweep away

  • verb eliminate completely and without a trace
    wipe out.
    • The old values have been wiped out
  • verb overwhelm emotionally
    sweep off.
    • Her swept her away
WordNet

take away

  • verb remove from a certain place, environment, or mental or emotional state; transport into a new location or state
    bear off; carry away; carry off; bear away.
    • Their dreams carried the Romantics away into distant lands
    • The car carried us off to the meeting
    • I'll take you away on a holiday
    • I got carried away when I saw the dead man and I started to cry
  • verb remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract
    withdraw; take; remove.
    • remove a threat
    • remove a wrapper
    • Remove the dirty dishes from the table
    • take the gun from your pocket
    • This machine withdraws heat from the environment
  • verb take out or remove
    take out.
    • take out the chicken after adding the vegetables
  • verb take from a person or place
    • We took the abused child away from its parents
  • verb buy and consume food from a restaurant or establishment that sells prepared food
    take out.
    • We'll take out pizza, since I am too tired to cook
  • verb get rid of something abstract
    remove.
    • The death of her mother removed the last obstacle to their marriage
    • God takes away your sins
  • verb take away a part from; diminish
    detract.
    • His bad manners detract from his good character
WordNet

take-away

  • adjective satellite of or involving food to be taken and eaten off the premises
    takeout.
    • takeout pizza
    • the takeout counter
    • `take-away' is chiefly British
WordNet

tear away

  • verb rip off violently and forcefully
    tear off.
    • The passing bus tore off her side mirror
WordNet

throw away

  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss out.
    • Put away your worries
  • verb get rid of
    shake off; shed; throw off; drop; cast off; cast; throw.
    • he shed his image as a pushy boss
    • shed your clothes
WordNet

throwing away

  • noun getting rid something that is regarded as useless or undesirable
    discard.
WordNet

thrown-away

  • adjective satellite thrown away
    discarded; cast-off; throwaway.
    • wearing someone's cast-off clothes
    • throwaway children living on the streets
    • salvaged some thrown-away furniture
WordNet

To bargain away

  • to dispose of in a bargain; usually with a sense of loss or disadvantage; as, to bargain away one's birthright. "The heir . . . had somehow bargained away the estate."
Webster 1913

To bear away

  • (Naut.), to change the course of a ship, and make her run before the wind.
Webster 1913

To bear away the bell

  • to win the prize at a race where the prize was a bell; hence, to be superior in something. Fuller.
Webster 1913

To blaze away

  • to discharge a firearm, or to continue firing; said esp. of a number of persons, as a line of soldiers. Also used (fig.) of speech or action. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To boil away

  • to vaporize; to evaporate or be evaporated by the action of heat.
Webster 1913

To break away

  • to disengage one's self abruptly; to come or go away against resistance.
Webster 1913

To brush away

  • to remove, as with a brush or brushing motion.
Webster 1913

To carry away

  • . (a) (Naut.) to break off; to lose; as, to carry away a fore-topmast. (b) To take possession of the mind; to charm; to delude; as, to be carried by music, or by temptation.
Webster 1913

To cast away

  • . (a) To throw away; to lavish; to waste. "Cast away a life" Addison. (b) To reject; to let perish. "Cast away his people." Rom. xi. 1. "Cast one away." Shak. (c) To wreck. "Cast away and sunk." Shak.
Webster 1913

To chide hither, chide from, ∨ chide away

  • to cause to come, or to drive away, by scolding or reproof.
Webster 1913

To claw away

  • to scold or revile. "The jade Fortune is to be clawed away for it, if you should lose it." L'Estrange.
Webster 1913

To come away

  • to part or depart .
Webster 1913

To dream away, out, through

  • etc., to pass in revery or inaction; to spend in idle vagaries; as, to dream away an hour; to dream through life. " Why does Antony dream out his hours?"
Webster 1913

To ease off, To ease away

  • (Naut.), to slacken a rope gradually.
Webster 1913

To edge awayoff

  • (Naut.), to increase the distance gradually from the shore, vessel, or other object.
Webster 1913

To explain away

  • to get rid of by explanation. "Those explain the meaning quite "away."
Webster 1913

To fall away

  • . (a) To lose flesh; to become lean or emaciated; to pine. (b) To renounce or desert allegiance; to revolt or rebel. (c) To renounce or desert the faith; to apostatize. "These . . . for a while believe, and in time of temptation fall away." Luke viii. 13. (d) To perish; to vanish; to be lost. "How . . . can the soul . . . fall away into nothing?" Addison. (e) To decline gradually; to fade; to languish, or become faint. "One color falls away by just degrees, and another rises insensibly." Addison.
Webster 1913

To fetch away

  • (Naut.), to break loose; to roll slide to leeward.
Webster 1913

To fling away

  • to reject; to discard.
    Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition. Shak.
Webster 1913

To fool away

  • to get rid of foolishly; to spend in trifles, idleness, folly, or without advantage.
Webster 1913

To fritter away

  • to diminish; to pare off; to reduce to nothing by taking away a little at a time; also, to waste piecemeal; as, to fritter away time, strength, credit, etc.
Webster 1913

To get away with

  • to carry off; to capture; hence, to get the better of; to defeat.
Webster 1913

To give away

  • to make over to another; to transfer.
    Whatsoever we employ in charitable uses during our lives, is given away from ourselves. Atterbury.
Webster 1913

To give one's self away

  • to make an inconsiderate surrender of one's cause, an unintentional disclosure of one's purposes, or the like. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To laugh away

  • . (a) To drive away by laughter; as, to laugh away regret . (b) To waste in hilarity . "Pompey doth this day laugh away his fortune." Shak.
Webster 1913

To make away

  • . (a) To put out of the way; to kill; to destroy . Obs.
    If a child were crooked or deformed in body or mind, they made him away. Burton.
    (b) To alienate; to transfer; to make over. Obs. Waller.
Webster 1913

To make away with

  • . (a) To carry off. (b) To transfer or alienate; hence, to spend; to dissipate . (c) To kill; to destroy.
  • . (a) To kill or destroy. (b) To carry off.
Webster 1913

To pass away

  • to disappear; to die; to vanish. "The heavens shall pass away." 2 Pet. iii. 10. "I thought to pass away before, but yet alive I am." Tennyson.
  • to spend; to waste. "Lest she pass away the flower of her age." Ecclus. xlii. 9. (b) to die
Webster 1913

To pluck away

  • to pull away, or to separate by pulling; to tear away.
Webster 1913

To put away

  • . (a) To renounce; to discard; to expel. (b) To divorce .
Webster 1913

To run away

  • to flee; to escape; to elope; to run without control or guidance.
Webster 1913

To run away with

  • . (a) To convey away hurriedly; to accompany in escape or elopement. (b) To drag rapidly and with violence; as, a horse runs away with a carriage.
Webster 1913

To salt away, To salt down

  • to prepare with, or pack in, salt for preserving, as meat, eggs, etc.; hence, colloquially, to save, lay up, or invest sagely, as money.
Webster 1913

To scare away

  • to drive away by frightening.
Webster 1913

To sleep away

  • to spend in sleep; as, to sleep away precious time.
Webster 1913

To take away

  • to carry off; to remove; to cause deprivation of; to do away with; as, a bill for taking away the votes of bishops. "By your own law, I take your life away." Dryden.
Webster 1913

To tame away

  • to give way to excitement and displeasure; to storm; also, to pass off in fumes.
Webster 1913

To throw away

  • . (a) To lose by neglect or folly; to spend in vain; to bestow without a compensation; as, to throw away time; to throw away money. (b) To reject; as, to throw away a good book, or a good offer.
Webster 1913

To thrust awayfrom

  • to push away; to reject.
Webster 1913

To turn asideaway

  • . (a) To turn from the direct course; to withdraw from a company; to deviate. (b) To depart; to remove. (c) To avert one's face.
Webster 1913

To turn away

  • . (a) To dismiss from service; to discard; as, to turn away a servant. (b) To avert; as, to turn away wrath or evil.
Webster 1913

To veer awayout

  • (Naut.), to let out; to slacken and let run; to pay out; as, to veer away the cable; to veer out a rope.
Webster 1913

To wear away

  • to consume; to impair, diminish, or destroy, by gradual attrition or decay.
Webster 1913

To whack away

  • to continue striking heavy blows; as, to whack away at a log. Colloq.
Webster 1913

toss away

  • verb throw or cast away
    dispose; cast aside; throw away; fling; toss; cast away; chuck out; throw out; cast out; put away; discard; toss out.
    • Put away your worries
WordNet

trifle away

  • verb spend wastefully
    trifle away; wanton.
    • wanton one's money away
WordNet

tuck away

  • verb eat up; usually refers to a considerable quantity of food
    tuck in; put away.
    • My son tucked in a whole pizza
WordNet

turn away

  • verb move so as not face somebody or something
  • verb turn from a straight course, fixed direction, or line of interest
    bend; deflect.
  • verb refuse entrance or membership
    refuse; turn down; reject.
    • They turned away hundreds of fans
    • Black people were often rejected by country clubs
  • verb turn away or aside
    avert.
    • They averted their eyes when the King entered
WordNet

turning away

  • noun deliberately avoiding; keeping away from or preventing from happening
    avoidance; shunning; dodging.
WordNet

walk away

  • verb go away from
    walk off.
    • The actor walked off before he got his cue
    • I got annoyed and just walked off
WordNet

wanton away

  • verb waste time; spend one's time idly or inefficiently
    trifle; piddle away; wanton; piddle.
  • verb spend wastefully
    trifle away; wanton.
    • wanton one's money away
WordNet

wash away

  • verb eliminate
    • wash away all the differences
  • verb remove by the application of water or other liquid and soap or some other cleaning agent
    wash; wash out; wash off.
    • he washed the dirt from his coat
    • The nurse washed away the blood
    • Can you wash away the spots on the windows?
    • he managed to wash out the stains
WordNet

wasting away

  • noun a decrease in size of an organ caused by disease or disuse
    atrophy; wasting.
WordNet

wear away

  • verb cut away in small pieces
    wear away; whittle down.
  • verb diminish, as by friction
    wear off.
    • Erosion wore away the surface
  • verb become ground down or deteriorate
    eat at; gnaw; erode; gnaw at.
    • Her confidence eroded
WordNet

wearing away

  • noun (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
    wearing; eating away; eroding; erosion.
WordNet

Where away

  • (Naut.), in what direction; as, where away is the land?
Webster 1913

while away

  • verb spend or pass, as with boredom or in a pleasant manner; of time
    get through.
WordNet

whisk away

  • verb take away quickly and suddenly
    whisk off.
WordNet

whittle away

  • verb cut away in small pieces
    wear away; whittle down.
WordNet

wipe away

  • verb remove by wiping
    wipe off.
WordNet

yack away

  • verb talk incessantly and tiresomely
    yack; jaw; yack away; rattle on.
WordNet

yap away

  • verb talk incessantly and tiresomely
    yack; jaw; yack away; rattle on.
WordNet