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all Idioms & Phrases


above all

  • adverb above and beyond all other consideration
    most especially; most importantly.
    • above all, you must be independent
  • adverb taking everything together
    first and last.
    • she was first and last a scientist
WordNet
  • before every other consideration; chiefly; in preference to other things.
Webster 1913

After all

  • adverb emphasizes something to be considered
    • after all, she is your boss, so invite her
    • he is, after all, our president
  • adverb in spite of expectations
    • came to the party after all
    • it didn't rain after all
WordNet
  • after considering everything to the contrary; nevertheless.
  • when everything has been considered; upon the whole.
Webster 1913

All along

  • adverb all the time or over a period of time
    right along.
    • She had known all along
    • the hope had been there all along
WordNet
  • . See under Along.
Webster 1913

All and some

  • individually and collectively, one and all. Obs. "Displeased all and some." Fairfax.
Webster 1913

all arounder

  • noun a versatile person who is expert at many things
    all arounder.
    • she's the best all-rounder they've seen in years
WordNet

all at once

  • adverb all at the same time
    all at once.
    • Let's say `Yes!' all at once
  • adverb without warning
    all at once.
    • all at once, he started shouting
WordNet

All but

  • . (a) Scarcely; not even. Obs. Shak. (b) Almost; nearly. "The fine arts were all but proscribed." Macaulay.
Webster 1913

all clear

  • noun a signal (usually a siren) that danger is over
  • noun permission to proceed because obstacles have been removed
WordNet

all day long

  • adverb during the entire day
    daylong.
    • light pours daylong into the parlor
WordNet

all fools' day

  • noun the first day of April which is celebrated by playing practical jokes
    April Fools'; April Fools' day.
WordNet
All" Fools' Day`
Definitions
  1. The first day of April, a day on which sportive impositions are practiced.
    The first of April, some do say, Is set apart for All Fools' Day. Poor Robin's Almanack (1760).
Webster 1913

all fours

  • noun card games in which points are won for taking the high or low or jack or game
    high-low-jack.
WordNet
All` fours"
Etymology
formerly, All` four".
Definitions
  1. All four legs of a quadruped; or the two legs and two arms of a person.
Webster 1913

all get out

  • noun an unimaginably large amount
    billy-ho; billyo; billyoh.
    • British say `it rained like billyo' where Americans say `it rained like all get out'
WordNet

all hail

All` hail"
Etymology
All + hail, interj.
Definitions
  1. All health; -- a phrase of salutation or welcome.
Webster 1913

All hollow

  • entirely, completely; as, to beat any one all hollow. Low
Webster 1913

all important

  • adjective satellite of the greatest importance
    all important; crucial; of the essence; essential.
    • the all-important subject of disarmament
    • crucial information
    • in chess cool nerves are of the essence
WordNet

all in

  • adjective satellite very tired
    beat; bushed; dead.
    • was all in at the end of the day
    • so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere
    • bushed after all that exercise
    • I'm dead after that long trip
WordNet

All in all

  • adverb with everything considered (and neglecting details)
    altogether; on the whole; tout ensemble.
    • altogether, I'm sorry it happened
    • all in all, it's not so bad
WordNet
  • a phrase which signifies all things to a person, or everything desired; (also adverbially) wholly; altogether.
    Thou shalt be all in all, and I in thee, Forever. Milton.
    Trust me not at all, or all in all. Tennyson.
Webster 1913

All in the wind

  • (Naut.), a phrase denoting that the sails are parallel with the course of the wind, so as to shake.
Webster 1913

all of a sudden

  • adverb without warning
    all at once.
    • all at once, he started shouting
  • adverb happening unexpectedly
    suddenly; of a sudden.
    • suddenly she felt a sharp pain in her side
WordNet

All one

  • the same thing in effect; that is, wholly the same thing.
Webster 1913

All over

  • adjective satellite having come or been brought to a conclusion
    concluded; terminated; complete; over; ended.
    • the harvesting was complete
    • the affair is over, ended, finished
    • the abruptly terminated interview
  • adverb over the entire area
    over.
    • the wallpaper was covered all over with flowers
    • she ached all over
    • everything was dusted over with a fine layer of soot
  • adverb to or in any or all places; (`everyplace' is used informally for `everywhere')
    everyplace; everywhere.
    • You find fast food stores everywhere
    • people everywhere are becoming aware of the problem
    • he carried a gun everywhere he went
    • looked all over for a suitable gift
WordNet
  • over the whole extent; thoroughly; wholly; as, she is her mother all over. Colloq.
Webster 1913

all right

  • adjective satellite being satisfactory or in satisfactory condition
    okay; hunky-dory; o.k.; ok; fine.
    • an all-right movie
    • the passengers were shaken up but are all right
    • is everything all right?
    • everything's fine
    • things are okay
    • dinner and the movies had been fine
    • another minute I'd have been fine
  • adverb an expression of agreement normally occurring at the beginning of a sentence
    alright; OK; fine; very well.
  • adverb without doubt (used to reinforce an assertion)
    alright.
    • it's expensive all right
  • adverb in a satisfactory or adequate manner; (`alright' is a nonstandard variant of `all right')
    alright; O.K.; okay.
    • she'll do okay on her own
    • held up all right under pressure
WordNet

all saints

All" Saints`, All" Saints' (Also<
  • All Saints
  • All Saints'
)
Definitions
  1. The first day of November, called, also, Allhallows or Hallowmas; a feast day kept in honor of all the saints; also, the season of this festival.
Webster 1913

all saints' day

  • noun a Christian feast day honoring all the saints; first observed in 835
    November 1; Hallowmas; Hallowmass; Allhallows.
WordNet

all souls' day

  • noun a day of supplication for all the souls in purgatory
    November 2.
WordNet
All" Souls' Day`
Definitions
  1. The second day of November; a feast day of the Roman Catholic church, on which supplications are made for the souls of the faithful dead.
Webster 1913

All the better

  • wholly the better; that is, better by the whole difference.
Webster 1913

All the same

  • adverb despite anything to the contrary (usually following a concession)
    nonetheless; nevertheless; however; withal; even so; notwithstanding; still; yet.
    • although I'm a little afraid, however I'd like to try it
    • while we disliked each other, nevertheless we agreed
    • he was a stern yet fair master
    • granted that it is dangerous, all the same I still want to go
WordNet
  • nevertheless. "There they [certain phenomena] remain rooted all the same, whether we recognize them or not." J. C. Shairp. "But Rugby is a very nice place all the same." T. Arnold. See also under All, n.
Webster 1913

all the time

  • adverb without respite
    day in and day out.
    • he plays chess day in and day out
WordNet

all the way

  • adverb to the goal
    the whole way.
    • she climbed the mountain all the way
  • adverb completely
    clear.
    • read the book clear to the end
    • slept clear through the night
    • there were open fields clear to the horizon
  • adverb not stopping short of sexual intercourse
    • she went all the way with him
WordNet

All the whole

  • the whole (emphatically). Obs. "All the whole army."
Webster 1913

All to, ∨ All-to

  • . In such phrases as "all to rent," "all to break," "all-to frozen," etc., which are of frequent occurrence in our old authors, the all and the to have commonly been regarded as forming a compound adverb, equivalent in meaning to entirely, completely, altogether. But the sense of entireness lies wholly in the word all (as it does in "all forlorn," and similar expressions), and the to properly belongs to the following word, being a kind of intensive prefix (orig. meaning asunder and answering to the LG. ter-, HG. zer-). It is frequently to be met with in old books, used without the all. Thus Wyclif says, "The vail of the temple was to rent:" and of Judas, "He was hanged and to-burst the middle:" i. e., burst in two, or asunder.
Webster 1913

all together

  • adverb all at the same time
    all at once.
    • Let's say `Yes!' all at once
  • adverb used of a group whose members acted or were acted upon collectively and when `all' and `together' can be separated by other words
    • they were herded all together
    • they were all herded together
    • the books lay all together in a heap
    • the books all lay together...
WordNet

All told

  • adverb with everything included or counted
    all told; altogether.
    • altogether he earns close to a million dollars
WordNet
  • all counted; in all.
Webster 1913

all too

  • adverb to a high degree
    only too.
    • she is all too ready to accept the job
WordNet

all-a-mort

All`-a-mort" adjective
Definitions
  1. See Alamort.
Webster 1913

all-around

  • adjective satellite many-sided
    well-rounded; all-round; all-around.
    • an all-around athlete
    • a well-rounded curriculum
WordNet

all-day sucker

  • noun hard candy on a stick
    sucker; lollipop.
WordNet

all-devouring

  • adjective satellite (of animals) both plant-eating and flesh-eating
WordNet

all-embracing

  • adjective satellite broad in scope or content
    wide; across-the-board; broad; blanket; all-encompassing; encompassing; all-embracing; extensive; panoptic.
    • across-the-board pay increases
    • an all-embracing definition
    • blanket sanctions against human-rights violators
    • an invention with broad applications
    • a panoptic study of Soviet nationality"- T.G.Winner
    • granted him wide powers
WordNet

all-encompassing

  • adjective satellite broad in scope or content
    wide; across-the-board; broad; blanket; all-encompassing; encompassing; all-embracing; extensive; panoptic.
    • across-the-board pay increases
    • an all-embracing definition
    • blanket sanctions against human-rights violators
    • an invention with broad applications
    • a panoptic study of Soviet nationality"- T.G.Winner
    • granted him wide powers
WordNet

all-fired

  • adjective satellite extreme; used as an intensifier
    • why is he in such an all-fired hurry?
  • adverb extremely
    damn; bloody.
    • you are bloody right
    • Why are you so all-fired aggressive?
WordNet

all-hail

All`-hail" transitive verb
Definitions
  1. To salute; to greet. Poet.
    Whiles I stood rapt in the wonder of it, came missives from the king, who all-hailed me "Thane of Cawdor." Shak.
Webster 1913

all-important

  • adjective satellite of the greatest importance
    all important; crucial; of the essence; essential.
    • the all-important subject of disarmament
    • crucial information
    • in chess cool nerves are of the essence
WordNet

all-inclusive

  • adjective satellite broad in scope or content
    wide; across-the-board; broad; blanket; all-encompassing; encompassing; all-embracing; extensive; panoptic.
    • across-the-board pay increases
    • an all-embracing definition
    • blanket sanctions against human-rights violators
    • an invention with broad applications
    • a panoptic study of Soviet nationality"- T.G.Winner
    • granted him wide powers
WordNet

all-knowing

  • adjective satellite infinitely wise
    omniscient.
WordNet

all-mains

  • adjective satellite used of a radio receiver that is adaptable to all voltages
    • an all-mains set
WordNet

all-metal

  • adjective satellite consisting completely of metal
    • all-metal airplanes
WordNet

all-night

  • adjective satellite lasting, open, or operating through the whole night
    nightlong; overnight.
    • a nightlong vigil
    • an all-night drugstore
    • an overnight trip
WordNet

all-or-none

  • adjective satellite occurring completely or not occurring at all
    all-or-none.
WordNet

all-or-none law

  • noun (neurophysiology) a nerve impulse resulting from a weak stimulus is just as strong as a nerve impulse resulting from a strong stimulus
WordNet

all-or-nothing

  • adjective satellite occurring completely or not occurring at all
    all-or-none.
WordNet

all-out

  • adjective satellite using all available resources
    full-scale.
    • all-out war
    • a full-scale campaign against nuclear power plants
WordNet

all-possessed

All`-pos*sessed" adjective
Definitions
  1. Controlled by an evil spirit or by evil passions; wild. Colloq.
Webster 1913

all-powerful

  • adjective satellite having unlimited power
    almighty; omnipotent.
WordNet

all-purpose

  • adjective satellite not limited in use or function
    general-purpose.
WordNet

all-round

  • adjective satellite many-sided
    well-rounded; all-round; all-around.
    • an all-around athlete
    • a well-rounded curriculum
WordNet

all-rounder

  • noun a versatile person who is expert at many things
    all arounder.
    • she's the best all-rounder they've seen in years
  • adjective satellite many-sided
    well-rounded; all-round; all-around.
    • an all-around athlete
    • a well-rounded curriculum
WordNet

all-terrain bike

  • noun a bicycle with a sturdy frame and fat tires; originally designed for riding in mountainous country
    off-roader; mountain bike.
WordNet

all-time

  • adjective satellite unsurpassed in some respect up to the present
    • prices at an all-time high
    • morale at an all-time low
    • among the all-time great lefthanders
WordNet

all-victorious

  • adjective satellite never having lost
WordNet

all-weather

  • adjective satellite usable or operative or practiced in all kinds of weather
    • a good all-weather road
    • all-weather flying
WordNet

And all

  • and the rest; and everything connected. "Bring our crown and all." Shak.
Webster 1913

any-and-all bid

  • noun a takeover bid where the acquirer offers to buy any and all shares outstanding
WordNet

Armed at all points

  • (Blazoning), completely incased in armor, sometimes described as armed cap-à-pie. Cussans.
Webster 1913

At all

  • adverb in the slightest degree or in any respect
    in the least; the least bit.
    • Are you at all interested? No, not at all
    • was not in the least unfriendly
WordNet
  • . (a) In every respect; wholly; thoroughly. Obs. "She is a shrew at al(l)." Chaucer. (b) A phrase much used by way of enforcement or emphasis, usually in negative or interrogative sentences, and signifying in any way or respect; in the least degree or to the least extent; in the least; under any circumstances; as, he has no ambition at all; has he any property at all? "Nothing at all. " Shak. "It thy father at all miss me." 1 Sam. xx. 6 .
Webster 1913

At all, At home, At large, At last, At length, At once, etc.

  • See under All, Home, Large, Last (phrase and syn.), Length, Once, etc.
Webster 1913

at all costs

  • adverb regardless of the cost involved
    at any cost; at any expense.
    • he wanted to save her life at all cost
WordNet

At all hands, On all hands

  • on all sides; from every direction; generally.
Webster 1913

At all points

  • in every particular, completely; perfectly. Shak.
Webster 1913

At all right

  • at all points; in all respects. Obs. Chaucer.
Webster 1913

be all and end all

  • noun the essential factor; the all-important element; the supreme aim
    be all and end all.
    • profit is the be-all and end-all of business
WordNet

be-all

Be"-all` noun
Definitions
  1. The whole; all that is to be. Poetic Shak.
Webster 1913

be-all and end-all

  • noun the essential factor; the all-important element; the supreme aim
    be all and end all.
    • profit is the be-all and end-all of business
WordNet

best of all

  • adverb especially fortunate
    • best of all, we don't have any homework!
WordNet

bugger all

  • noun little or nothing at all
    Fanny Adams; bugger all; sweet Fanny Adams.
    • I asked for a raise and they gave me bugger-all
    • I know sweet Fanny Adams about surgery
WordNet

By all means

  • adverb definitely or certainly
    • Visit us by all means
WordNet
  • most assuredly; without fail; certainly.
  • certainly; without fail; as, go, by all means.
Webster 1913

by all odds

  • adverb without question and beyond doubt
    decidedly; emphatically; in spades; unquestionably; definitely.
    • it was decidedly too expensive
    • she told him off in spades
    • by all odds they should win
WordNet

cure-all

  • noun hypothetical remedy for all ills or diseases; once sought by the alchemists
    catholicon; nostrum; panacea.
WordNet

do-all

Do"-all` noun
Definitions
  1. General manager; factotum.
    Under him, Dunstan was the do-all at court, being the king's treasurer, councilor, chancellor, confessor, all things. Fuller.
Webster 1913

end-all

  • noun the ultimate goal
    • human beings are not the end-all of evolution
WordNet

fall all over

  • verb display excessive love or show excessive gratitude towards
    • This student falls all over her former professor when she sees him
WordNet

first of all

  • adverb before anything else
    firstly; first off; foremost; first.
    • first we must consider the garter snake
WordNet

for all intents and purposes

  • adverb in every practical sense
    for all intents and purposes; for all practical purposes.
    • to all intents and purposes the case is closed
    • the rest are for all practical purposes useless
WordNet

for all practical purposes

  • adverb in every practical sense
    for all intents and purposes; for all practical purposes.
    • to all intents and purposes the case is closed
    • the rest are for all practical purposes useless
WordNet

For all that

  • notwithstanding; in spite of.
Webster 1913

For all the world

  • adverb under any circumstances
    for love or money; for anything; for any price.
    • she wouldn't give up her pets for love or money
WordNet
  • . (a) Precisely; exactly. (b) For any consideration.
  • wholly; exactly. "Whose posy was, for all the world, like cutlers' poetry." Shak.
Webster 1913

For good, ∨ For good and all

  • completely and finally; fully; truly.
    The good woman never died after this, till she came to die for good and all. L'Estrange.
Webster 1913

For me, ∨ For all me

  • as far as regards me.
Webster 1913

free-for-all

  • noun a noisy fight in a crowd
    brawl.
WordNet

fuck all

  • noun little or nothing at all
    Fanny Adams; bugger all; sweet Fanny Adams.
    • I asked for a raise and they gave me bugger-all
    • I know sweet Fanny Adams about surgery
WordNet

go all out

  • verb perform a task as well as possible
    do one's best; give one's best; give full measure.
    • The cast gives full measure every night
WordNet

heal all

  • noun decumbent blue-flowered European perennial thought to possess healing properties; naturalized throughout North America
    self-heal; Prunella vulgaris.
  • noun common woodland herb of temperate North America having yellow nodding flowers and small round blue fruits
    yellow clintonia; Clintonia borealis.
WordNet

in all

  • adverb with everything included or counted
    all told; altogether.
    • altogether he earns close to a million dollars
WordNet

in all likelihood

  • adverb with considerable certainty; without much doubt
    belike; probably; likely; in all likelihood.
    • He is probably out of the country
    • in all likelihood we are headed for war
WordNet

in all probability

  • adverb with considerable certainty; without much doubt
    belike; probably; likely; in all likelihood.
    • He is probably out of the country
    • in all likelihood we are headed for war
WordNet

In all reason

  • in justice; with rational ground; in a right view.
    When anything is proved by as good arguments as a thing of that kind is capable of, we ought not, in reason, to doubt of its existence. Tillotson.
Webster 1913

In conscience, In all conscience

  • in deference or obedience to conscience or reason; in reason; reasonably.
    "This is enough in conscience." Howell. "Half a dozen fools are, in all conscience, as many as you should require." Swift.
Webster 1913

It is all up with him

  • it is all over with him; he is lost.
Webster 1913

jack of all trades

  • noun a person able to do a variety of different jobs acceptably well
  • noun a man skilled in various odd jobs and other small tasks
    odd-job man; handyman.
WordNet

Jack-at-all-trades

  • one who can turn his hand to any kind of work.
Webster 1913

know-all

  • noun someone who thinks he knows everything and refuses to accept advice or information from others
    know-all.
WordNet
Know"-all` noun
Definitions
  1. One who knows everything; hence, one who makes pretension to great knowledge; a wiseacre; -- usually ironical. Colloq. or R. = know-it-all
Webster 1913

know-it-all

  • noun someone who thinks he knows everything and refuses to accept advice or information from others
    know-all.
WordNet

least of all

  • adverb especially not
    • nobody, least of all Joe, agreed with me
WordNet

Of all loves

  • for the sake of all love; by all means. Obs. "Mrs. Arden desired him of all loves to come back again." Holinshed.
Webster 1913

of all time

  • adverb at any time
    ever.
    • did you ever smoke?
    • the best con man of all time
WordNet

on all fours

  • adverb on hands and knees
    • he got down on all fours to play with his grandson
WordNet

once and for all

  • adverb in a conclusive way
    conclusively.
    • we settled the problem conclusively
WordNet

Over all

  • (Her.), placed over or upon other bearings, and therefore hinding them in part; said of a charge.
  • everywhere. Obs. Chaucer.
Webster 1913

pis aller

  • noun an expedient adopted only in desperation
    last resort.
    • `pis aller' is French for `worst going'
WordNet

pull out all the stops

  • verb use all resources available
    • The organizers pulled out all the stops for the centennial meeting
WordNet

save-all

  • noun a receptacle for catching waste products for further use
  • noun a sail set to catch wind spilled from a larger sail
  • noun a net hung between ship and pier while loading a ship
WordNet
Save"-all` noun
Etymology
Save + all.
Definitions
  1. Anything which saves fragments, or prevents waste or loss. Specifically: (a) A device in a candlestick to hold the ends of candles, so that they be burned. (b) (Naut.) A small sail sometimes set under the foot of another sail, to catch the wind that would pass under it. Totten. (c) A trough to prevent waste in a paper-making machine.
Webster 1913

spend-all

  • noun someone who spends money prodigally
    spendthrift; spender; scattergood.
WordNet

To all intents, and purposes

  • in all applications or senses; practically; really; virtually; essentially. "He was miserable to all intents and purpose."
Webster 1913

to all intents and purposes

  • adverb in every practical sense
    for all intents and purposes; for all practical purposes.
    • to all intents and purposes the case is closed
    • the rest are for all practical purposes useless
WordNet

To be, go, or run, on all fours

  • (Fig.), to be on the same footing; to correspond (with) exactly; to be alike in all the circumstances to be considered. "This example is on all fours with the other." "No simile can go on all fours." Macaulay.
Webster 1913

To be all squares

  • to be all settled. Colloq. Dickens.
Webster 1913

To break (one) all up

  • to unsettle or disconcert completely; to upset. Colloq.
Webster 1913

To carry all before one

  • to overcome all obstacles; to have uninterrupted success.
Webster 1913

To go all fours

  • to correspond exactly, point for point.
    It is not easy to make a simile go on all fours. Macaulay.
Webster 1913

To go the way of all the earth

  • to die. = to go the way of all flesh.
Webster 1913

ty-all

Ty"-all` noun
Definitions
  1. Something serving to tie or secure. Obs. Latimer.
Webster 1913

uptails all

Up"tails` all"
Definitions
  1. An old game at cards. Obs.
  2. Revelers; roysterers. Obs. Decker.
  3. Revelry; confusion; frolic. Obs. Herrick.
Webster 1913

With all one's whole heart

  • very earnestly; fully; completely; devotedly.
Webster 1913

With might and main, ∨ With all one's might and main

  • with all one's strength; with violent effort.
Webster 1913