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gird Meaning, Definition & Usage

  1. verb prepare oneself for a military confrontation
    build up; fortify; arm.
    • The U.S. is girding for a conflict in the Middle East
    • troops are building up on the Iraqi border
  2. verb put a girdle on or around
    girdle.
    • gird your loins
  3. verb bind with something round or circular
    encircle.
WordNet

Gird noun
Etymology
See Yard a measure.
Definitions
  1. A stroke with a rod or switch; a severe spasm; a twinge; a pang.
    Conscience . . . is freed from many fearful girds and twinges which the atheist feels. Tillotson.
  2. A cut; a sarcastic remark; a gibe; a sneer.
    I thank thee for that gird, good Tranio. Shak.
Gird transitive verb
Etymology
See Gird, n., and cf. Girde, v.
Definitions
  1. To strike; to smite. Obs.
    To slay him and to girden off his head. Chaucer.
  2. To sneer at; to mock; to gibe.
    Being moved, he will not spare to gird the gods. Shak.
Gird intransitive verb
Definitions
  1. To gibe; to sneer; to break a scornful jest; to utter severe sarcasms.
    Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me. Shak.
Gird transitive verb
Etymology
OE. girden, gurden, AS. gyrdan; akin to OS. gurdian, D. gorden, OHG. gurten, G. gürten, Icel. gyra, Sw. gjorda, Dan. giorde, Goth. bigaírdan to begird, and prob. to E. yard an inclosure. Cf. Girth, n. & v., Girt, v. t.
Wordforms
imperfect & past participle Girt or Girded; present participle & verbal noun Girding
Definitions
  1. To encircle or bind with any flexible band.
  2. To make fast, as clothing, by binding with a cord, girdle, bandage, etc.
  3. To surround; to encircle, or encompass.
    That Nyseian isle, Girt with the River Triton. Milton.
  4. To clothe; to swathe; to invest.
    I girded thee about with fine linen. Ezek. xvi. 10.
    The Son . . . appeared Girt with omnipotence. Milton.
  5. To prepare; to make ready; to equip; as, to gird one's self for a contest.
    Thou hast girded me with strength. Ps. xviii. 39.

Webster 1913


"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

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