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crown Meaning, Definition & Usage

  1. noun the Crown (or the reigning monarch) as the symbol of the power and authority of a monarchy
    • the colonies revolted against the Crown
  2. noun the part of a tooth above the gum that is covered with enamel
  3. noun a wreath or garland worn on the head to signify victory
  4. noun an ornamental jeweled headdress signifying sovereignty
    diadem.
  5. noun the part of a hat (the vertex) that covers the crown of the head
  6. noun an English coin worth 5 shillings
  7. noun the upper branches and leaves of a tree or other plant
    treetop.
  8. noun the top or extreme point of something (usually a mountain or hill)
    top; tip; summit; peak; crest.
    • the view from the peak was magnificent
    • they clambered to the tip of Monadnock
    • the region is a few molecules wide at the summit
  9. noun the award given to the champion
    pennant.
  10. noun the top of the head
    poll; pate.
  11. noun (dentistry) dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a broken or decayed tooth
    jacket; jacket crown; crownwork; cap.
    • tomorrow my dentist will fit me for a crown
  12. noun the center of a cambered road
    crest.
  13. verb invest with regal power; enthrone
    coronate.
    • The prince was crowned in Westminster Abbey
  14. verb be the culminating event
    top.
    • The speech crowned the meeting
  15. verb form the topmost part of
    • A weather vane crowns the building
  16. verb put an enamel cover on
    • crown my teeth
WordNet

Crown
Definitions
  1. p. p. of Crow. Obs.
Crown noun
Etymology
OE. corone, coroun, crune, croun, OF. corone, corune, F. couronne, fr. L. corona crown, wreath; akin to Gr. anything curved, crown; cf. also L. curvus curved, E. curve, curb, Gael. cruinn round, W. crwn. Cf. Cornice, Corona, Coroner, Coronet.
Definitions
  1. A wreath or garland, or any ornamental fillet encircling the head, especially as a reward of victory or mark of honorable distinction; hence, anything given on account of, or obtained by, faithful or successful effort; a reward. "An olive branch and laurel crown." Shak.
    They do it to obtain a corruptible crown; but we an incorruptiblle. 1 Cor. ix. 25.
    Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life. Rev. ii. 10.
  2. A royal headdress or cap of sovereignty, worn by emperors, kings, princes, etc. ✍ Nobles wear coronets; the triple crown of the pope is usually called a tiara. The crown of England is a circle of gold with crosses, fleurs-de-lis, and imperial arches, inclosing a crimson velvet cap, and ornamented with thousands of diamonds and precious stones.
  3. The person entitled to wear a regal or imperial crown; the sovereign; -- with the definite article.
    Parliament may be dissolved by the demise of the crown. Blackstone.
    Large arrears of pay were due to the civil and military servants of the crown. Macaulay.
  4. Imperial or regal power or dominion; sovereignty.
    There is a power behind the crown greater than the crown itself. Junius.
  5. Anything which imparts beauty, splendor, honor, dignity, or finish.
    The hoary head is a crown of glory, if it be found in the way of righteousness. Prov. xvi. 31.
    A virtuous woman is a crown to her husband. Prov. xvi. 4.
  6. Highest state; acme; consummation; perfection.
    Mutual love, the crown of all our bliss. Milton.
  7. The topmost part of anything; the summit.
    The steepy crown of the bare mountains. Dryden.
  8. The topmost part of the head (see Illust. of Bird.); that part of the head from which the hair descends toward the sides and back; also, the head or brain.
    From toe to crown he'll fill our skin with pinches. Shak.
    Twenty things which I set down: This done, I twenty more-had in my crown. Bunyan.
  9. The part of a hat above the brim.
  10. (Anat.) The part of a tooth which projects above the gum; also, the top or grinding surface of a tooth.
  11. (Arch.) The vertex or top of an arch; -- applied generally to about one third of the curve, but in a pointed arch to the apex only.
  12. (Bot.) Same as Corona.
  13. (Naut.) (a) That part of an anchor where the arms are joined to the shank. (b) The rounding, or rounded part, of the deck from a level line. (c) pl. The bights formed by the several turns of a cable. Totten.
  14. The upper range of facets in a rose diamond.
  15. The dome of a furnace.
  16. (Geom.) The area inclosed between two concentric perimeters.
  17. (Eccl.) A round spot shaved clean on the top of the head, as a mark of the clerical state; the tonsure.
  18. A size of writing paper. See under Paper.
  19. A coin stamped with the image of a crown; hence,a denomination of money; as, the English crown, a silver coin of the value of five shillings sterling, or a little more than $1.20; the Danish or Norwegian crown, a money of account, etc., worth nearly twenty-seven cents.
  20. An ornaments or decoration representing a crown; as, the paper is stamped with a crown.
Crown transitive verb
Etymology
OE. coronen, corunen, crunien, crounien, OF. coroner, F. couronner, fr. L. coronare, fr. corona a crown. See Crown, n.
Wordforms
imperfect & past participle Crowned present participle & verbal noun Crowning
Definitions
  1. To cover, decorate, or invest with a crown; hence, to invest with royal dignity and power.
    Her who fairest does appear, Crown her queen of all the year. Dryden.
    Crown him, and say, "Long live our emperor." Shak.
  2. To bestow something upon as a mark of honor, dignity, or recompense; to adorn; to dignify.
    Thou . . . hast crowned him with glory and honor. Ps. viii. 5.
  3. To form the topmost or finishing part of; to complete; to consummate; to perfect.
    Amidst the grove that crowns yon tufted hill. Byron.
    One day shall crown the alliance. Shak.
    To crown the whole, came a proposition. Motley.
  4. (Mech.) To cause to round upward; to make anything higher at the middle than at the edges, as the face of a machine pulley.
  5. (Mil.) To effect a lodgment upon, as upon the crest of the glacis, or the summit of the breach.

Webster 1913


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