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calk Meaning, Definition & Usage

  1. noun a metal cleat on the bottom front of a horseshoe to prevent slipping
    calkin.
  2. verb provide with calks
    • calk horse shoes
  3. verb seal with caulking
    caulk.
    • caulk the window
  4. verb injure with a calk
WordNet

Calk transitive verb
Etymology
Either corrupted fr. F. calfater (cf. Pg. calafetar, Sp. calafetear), fr. Ar. qalafa to fill up crevices with the fibers of palm tree or moss; or fr. OE. cauken to tred, through the French fr. L. calcare, fr. calx heel. Cf. Calk to copy, Inculcate.
Wordforms
imperfect &past participle Calked ; present participle & verbal noun Calking
Definitions
  1. To drive tarred oakum into the seams between the planks of (a ship, boat, etc.), to prevent leaking. The calking is completed by smearing the seams with melted pitch.
  2. To make an indentation in the edge of a metal plate, as along a seam in a steam boiler or an iron ship, to force the edge of the upper plate hard against the lower and so fill the crevice.
Calk transitive verb
Etymology
E.calquer to trace, It. caicare to trace, to trample, fr. L. calcare to trample, fr. calx heel. Cf. Calcarate.
Definitions
  1. To copy, as a drawing, by rubbing the back of it with red or black chalk, and then passing a blunt style or needle over the lines, so as to leave a tracing on the paper or other thing against which it is laid or held. Writting also calque
Calk noun
Etymology
Cf. AS calc shoe, hoof, L. calx, calcis, hel, cälcar, spur.
Definitions
  1. A sharp-pointed piece or iron or steel projecting downward on the shoe of a nore or an ox, to prevent the animal from slipping; -- called also calker, calkin.
  2. An instrument with sharp points, worn on the sole of a shoe or boot, to prevent slipping.
Calk intransitive verb
Definitions
  1. To furnish with calks, to prevent slipping on ice; as, to calk the shoes of a horse or an ox.
  2. To wound with a calk; as when a horse injures a leg or a foot with a calk on one of the other feet.

Webster 1913