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magical Idioms & Phrases


Celestial magic

  • a supposed supernatural power which gave to spirits a kind of dominion over the planets, and to the planets an influence over men.
Webster 1913

Magic circle

  • a series of concentric circles containing the numbers 12 to 75 in eight radii, and having somewhat similar properties to the magic square.
Webster 1913

Magic humming bird

  • (Zoöl.), a Mexican humming bird (Iache magica) , having white downy thing tufts.
Webster 1913

Magic lantern

  • noun an early form of slide projector
WordNet
  • . See Lantern.
  • an optical instrument consisting of a case inclosing a light, and having suitable lenses in a lateral tube, for throwing upon a screen, in a darkened room or the like, greatly magnified pictures from slides placed in the focus of the outer lens.
Webster 1913

Magic square

  • noun a square matrix of n rows and columns; the first n^2 integers are arranged in the cells of the matrix in such a way that the sum of any row or column or diagonal is the same
WordNet
  • numbers so disposed in parallel and equal rows in the form of a square, that each row, taken vertically, horizontally, or diagonally, shall give the same sum, the same product, or an harmonical series, according as the numbers taken are in arithmetical, geometrical, or harmonical progression.
Webster 1913

Magic wand

  • a wand used by a magician in performing feats of magic.
Webster 1913

magical ability

  • noun an ability to perform magic
    magical ability.
WordNet

magical power

  • noun an ability to perform magic
    magical ability.
WordNet

magical spell

  • noun a verbal formula believed to have magical force
    magic spell; spell; charm.
    • he whispered a spell as he moved his hands
    • inscribed around its base is a charm in Balinese
WordNet

Natural magic

  • the art of employing the powers of nature to produce effects apparently supernatural.
Webster 1913

Superstitious, ∨ Geotic, magic

  • the invocation of devils or demons, involving the supposition of some tacit or express agreement between them and human beings.
Webster 1913