logo
Writing Improvement Software

evidence Idioms & Phrases


best evidence rule

  • noun a rule of evidence requiring that to prove the content of a writing or recording or photograph the original is required
WordNet

Circumstantial evidence

  • noun evidence providing only a basis for inference about the fact in dispute
    circumstantial evidence.
WordNet
  • (Law), evidence obtained from circumstances, which necessarily or usually attend facts of a particular nature, from which arises presumption. According to some authorities circumstantial is distinguished from positive evidence in that the latter is the testimony of eyewitnesses to a fact or the admission of a party; but the prevalent opinion now is that all such testimony is dependent on circumstances for its support. All testimony is more or less circumstantial. Wharton.
Webster 1913

Circumstantial evidence, Conclusive evidence, etc.

  • See under Circumstantial, Conclusive, etc.
Webster 1913

cogent evidence

  • noun any factual evidence that helps to establish the truth of something
    proof.
    • if you have any proof for what you say, now is the time to produce it
WordNet

Conclusive evidence

  • (Law), that of which, from its nature, the law allows no contradiction or explanation.
Webster 1913

corroborating evidence

  • noun additional evidence or evidence of different kind that supports a proof already offered in a proceeding
WordNet

Crown's, King's, ∨ Queen's evidence

  • evidence for the crown. Eng.
Webster 1913

Demurrer to evidence

  • an exception taken by a party to the evidence offered by the opposite party, and an objecting to proceed further, on the allegation that such evidence is not sufficient in law to maintain the issue, and a reference to the court to determine the point.
Webster 1913

Direct evidence

  • noun evidence (usually the testimony of a witness) directly related to the fact in dispute
WordNet
  • (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. Wharton.
Webster 1913

evidence

  • noun your basis for belief or disbelief; knowledge on which to base belief
    grounds.
    • the evidence that smoking causes lung cancer is very compelling
  • noun an indication that makes something evident
    • his trembling was evidence of his fear
  • noun (law) all the means by which any alleged matter of fact whose truth is investigated at judicial trial is established or disproved
  • verb provide evidence for; stand as proof of; show by one's behavior, attitude, or external attributes
    attest; certify; demonstrate; manifest.
    • His high fever attested to his illness
    • The buildings in Rome manifest a high level of architectural sophistication
    • This decision demonstrates his sense of fairness
  • verb provide evidence for
    show; testify; bear witness; prove.
    • The blood test showed that he was the father
    • Her behavior testified to her incompetence
  • verb give evidence
    tell.
    • he was telling on all his former colleague
WordNet
  • to confess a crime and give evidence against one's accomplices.
Webster 1913

Ex parte hearing ∨ evidence

  • (Law), that which is had or taken by one side or party in the absence of the other. Hearings before grand juries, and affidavits, are ex parte.
Webster 1913

footprint evidence

  • noun evidence in the form of footprints
    • there was footprint evidence that he had been at the scene of the crime
WordNet

Hearsay evidence

  • noun evidence based on what someone has told the witness and not of direct knowledge
WordNet
  • (Law), that species of testimony which consists in a a narration by one person of matters told him by another. It is, with a few exceptions, inadmissible as testimony.
Webster 1913

in evidence

  • adjective satellite clearly to be seen
    • they were much in evidence during the fighting
    • she made certain that her engagement ring was in evidence
WordNet

Indirect evidence

  • noun evidence providing only a basis for inference about the fact in dispute
    circumstantial evidence.
WordNet
  • evidence or testimony which is circumstantial or inferential, but without witness; opposed to direct evidence.
Webster 1913

King'sQueen's, evidence

  • testimony in favor of the Crown by a witness who confesses his guilt as an accomplice. See under Evidence. Eng.
Webster 1913

King's, Queen's ∨ State's

Webster 1913

Material evidence

  • (Law), evidence which conduces to the proof or disproof of a relevant hypothesis. Wharton.
Webster 1913

parol evidence rule

  • noun a rule that oral evidence cannot be used to contradict the terms of a written contract
WordNet

Presumptive evidence

  • (Law), that which is derived from circumstances which necessarily or usually attend a fact, as distinct from direct evidence or positive proof; indirect or circumstantial evidence. "Presumptive evidence of felony should be cautiously admitted." Blackstone. The distinction, however, between direct and presumptive (or circumstantial) evidence is now generally abandoned; all evidence being now more or less direct and more or less presumptive.
Webster 1913

Prima facie evidence

  • (of a fact) (Law), evidence which is sufficient to establish the fact unless rebutted.
Webster 1913

Queen's counsel, Queen's evidence

  • . See King's counsel, King's evidence, under King.
Webster 1913

rule of evidence

  • noun (law) a rule of law whereby any alleged matter of fact that is submitted for investigation at a judicial trial is established or disproved
WordNet

Secondary evidence

  • that which is admitted upon failure to obtain the primary or best evidence.
Webster 1913

self-evidence

Self`-ev"i*dence noun
Definitions
  1. The quality or state of being self-evident. Locke.
Webster 1913

State's evidence

  • noun evidence for the prosecution in criminal proceedings
WordNet
  • . See Probator, 2, and under Evidence.
  • evidence for the government or the people. U. S.
Webster 1913

To turn

Webster 1913

"Rowling never met an adverb she didn't like."

-Stephen King on J.K Rowling's excessive use of adverbs.

Fear not the Adverb Hell!

Writing Improvement Software
Writing Improvement Software